Ready to launch... almost

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ninja2010

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i'm about ready to launch my toon in the clack this weekend. but i have a couple of questions...

this may sound stooopid, but do i need oars if i have a 2hp motor? i'm planning to launch at riverside and maybe motor to carver and drift down, maybe stop and fish from the bank...

also, i'm not sure what kind of anchor i should get for river use. i read somewhere that a chain works pretty good, but what's your rec?

my toon is a 50lb 8-footer, and i weigh about 140, so i'm thinking 10lbs would suffice, what say you?

appreciate any input.
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Yes, bring your oars, don't mob that thing without 'em. I don't think you are going to enjoy the slow, slow ride from Riverside up to Carver. Just tool around where ever you put in. And don't just drop in at one spot unless you can easily manage 7-10 knots on your toon. 10 knots is cookin for an 8 footer. Motor up a ways and find some good water, with an oar, you can have a tiller, and side drift down with the current. I have whacked some fish doing this, it is very effective. I use a 12 pound pyarimid, and I like how it sticks in the Clack. Be careful it is a bit of a boulder field in some places. Have yet to cut one off. Except for the Colombia...Sorry dude, we'll get goin on that thing soon! But if I were you, I would start out at Barton and work my way down. Hit the half mile or so above, and below Barton, Move down to Carver, do the Same, and then hit Riverside. Cover a lot of water if you are not immediately getting take downs. Or even better, call this shuttle service on the Clack, and treat your toon like drift boat. Except you will be able to make multiple passes on every hole, run, slot, and chute in the Clackamas. Don's Shuttle Service 503-309-5550. That is what I would do anyways.
 
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ninja2010

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as usual, aa, appreciate your prompt and informative response.

so, okay, i'll load up my oars. now, i've not tried the motor yet. this is a maiden voyage. i have a torqueedo 801. i think i can hit 5 knots cruising, and would prolly hit 10 if i gun it. but i don't like gunning electrics...

i'll do the multiple drops later. but for this first trip i'm just gonna try to motor up to carver. btw, why is it a "slow, slow ride"? is it coz the river's running fast from carver to rs, and heading upriver becomes tedious? anyway, i was gonna just float around and fish, fish, fish and check depths, etc.

also, thanks for don's number. do you know how much this shuttle service costs?

n.b. columbia soon?
 
A

ArcticAmoeba

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I think Don is less than 15 bucks. Pretty good prices for shuttles.

Yeah I'm with you, I do not like to really jam out on an electric motor, your battery goes so quickly already, plus I have toasted one on Hagg trying to tow a huge tree, stupid, but it made for a wicked Bass hole. I say slow, because there are some fairly long stretches, and they do flow prety fast in places, but 5 knots is not moving that fast for how many river miles it is between Riverside, and Carver, plus the extra work the motor has to do to fight the current. I hit short sections with a motor because I like to make dozens of passes through a set of 6-8 or so places to fish. That is plenty of water for me normally to pull at least one out with the 'toon. I really like having the magic carpet, but I don't like that the regs changed about registration of floating craft. It used to be be sub 10 was gravey with no stickers, not anymore. Oh, well, still nice to have a motor on board. Do you have a depth finder, or fish finder? It might increase your odds if you can find the right depth to fish.
 
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ninja2010

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I think Don is less than 15 bucks. Pretty good prices for shuttles.

Yeah I'm with you, I do not like to really jam out on an electric motor, your battery goes so quickly already, plus I have toasted one on Hagg trying to tow a huge tree, stupid, but it made for a wicked Bass hole. I say slow, because there are some fairly long stretches, and they do flow prety fast in places, but 5 knots is not moving that fast for how many river miles it is between Riverside, and Carver, plus the extra work the motor has to do to fight the current. I hit short sections with a motor because I like to make dozens of passes through a set of 6-8 or so places to fish. That is plenty of water for me normally to pull at least one out with the 'toon. I really like having the magic carpet, but I don't like that the regs changed about registration of floating craft. It used to be be sub 10 was gravey with no stickers, not anymore. Oh, well, still nice to have a motor on board. Do you have a depth finder, or fish finder? It might increase your odds if you can find the right depth to fish.

gotcha on the rs to carver stretches. maybe i won't get to carver...

i do like your "make dozens of passes through a set of 6-8 or so places to fish". and i'd also like to stop and bank fish too at spots that are otherwise inaccessible.

the toon has regs and i have a humminbird portable... what depth should i look for - 3'-7'? i definitely like the idea of increasing my odds...
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Yeah, go as far as you feel comfortable, with how much battery life you have.

Absolutely, bank it and fish as many places as you see fit below the high water line. Also I would try to bank it or drop anchor to fight a fish. Trust me. Haha.:lol:

For slots, chutes and general runs, I would look for 10' and less to start out with. Just makes it simple. But don't forget about flats too. They will run close to the bank in many places, so when sidedrifting cast in tight to the shore line and behind downed trees, big rocks, and points.
 
rtito

rtito

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i would like to hear how your trip on the clack turned out. have a pontoon would like to try the mckiver park area.
 
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ninja2010

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well, i found out that motoring upstream on a trib with its faster surface flows is not so good with an electric. i didn't want to crank it to conserve juice, so i couldn't make it too far. ended up just making many slow and relatively short drifts. (i tried it on the willy before that and it was not a problem at all to move a couple of miles upstream on cruise/putter speed because the flow was relatively slower.)

but it was a blast to be able to hit the opposite bank and fish spots i normally couldn't get to from the bank. the toon is totally made for rivers, and it handles very well - i was even a bit surprised how well it tracked on the drift. the anchor helped a lot to be able to make quick stops.
 
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Outdrsmn

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be careful achoring that small toon in current. too fast and you will go over backwards.
 
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your not a wus, being prudent will get you home safe. And safety is the name of the game.
 
Troutski

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One more thing...

One more thing...

One thing I realized in a hurry was a long handled net...trust me here, I picked up one of those rubber nets with an extendable handles (Bi-mart)...try to net the fish in the sitting position, it is like doing nine things all by yourself at the same time. Not that it can't be done, just try not to get to ampted...that water is cold. Here's to a perfect trip.....:dance: :clap::clap:

Chuck
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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i would like to hear how your trip on the clack turned out. have a pontoon would like to try the mckiver park area.

The area below Dog Creek, but still in the park is called the Minefield for a reason. If you are not confident in your abilities on the sticks, or have never done it before, I highly recommend you either do it in a Kayak, or ride in someones boat for your first trip out. It is always dangerous, regardless of water levels, it just changes the "lane" when the water is up high, or way down. I have witnessed more than a handful of drift boats get turned sideways, and they were full to the gunnels in less than 10 secoonds. I even saw a guy throw anchor above it, and he let out too much line. Almost turned his 35,000 dolloar NorthRiver into a 35,000 dollar jet diver. Be very wary of that stretch of river, it is the only one I actually scout before I hit it. You have too, and you have to watch river levels, but more specifically water flows. The Rivermill Dam is less than a mile upriver, and the Minefield is drastically affected by it operations.
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Barb, the easiest thing to do, is set the hook, and keep tension, and try your darndest to row to the bank, either that or drop anchor, and be ready with a net. They work if the handle is short enough, and the bucket is deep enough.
 
Raincatcher

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Short is my middle name...

Short is my middle name...

ArcticAmoeba;
Thanks for the tips (no pun intended for the last post on McIver) I will put them to good use. I have several nets and will be modifying a nice deep one with that gunk to dip tools into for a better grip,then a cork or cane tip in the opening. That just might work,huh? Thanks again. Be safe.
Barb
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Should work perfectly Barb. I too had to modify an existing net that I had, but it works very well. Short handle with a piece of wood stuffed, then screwed into the end that has little notches carved into it for grip. The dip rubber stuff sounds like a pretty good idea, especially if it is the stuff that dries with a slightly rough finish, as opposed to the slick surface finish of some.

And Tito, I am not saying you shouldn't, but being involved with a search and rescue crew in college, we had more than a few calls to McIver, and the Minefield. But if you can scout it prior, it is easy to spot how the chute is oriented due to river flow, and level. You can always try the Feldheimer to Barton drift too. That is my most productive Steelhead drift on the Clack for my 'toon. And I'm sure I will wrangle plenty of Chinook again this year from it. I really like that particular drift. And if you need shuttle service. Shoot me a message. I know of only one full timer, and he is half the price of Sandy shuttles.
 
Troutski

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Sure did...

Sure did...

Hells bells! :shock: I never thought about what to do if I actually caught a fish!! :rolleyes: Did that net work well for you,Chuck?
Be safe.
Barb

Like I said and AA will a test, rowing keeping the fish undercontrol,striping line, rowing, controlling the fish, grabbing the net, controlling the fish, stripping in line, rowing the craft, getting to the gravel bar, dropping anchor.....Then Netting the fish, priceless...worth every bit of energy...what a rush.

Chuck
 

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