First time steelhead fishing

tastybrookies

tastybrookies

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Hey all, I’m going fishing for steelhead for the first time ever, and I have no clue what I’m doing. I scored the Addicted Winter Steelhead kit from Costco for Christmas, but just realized my trout pole isn’t strong enough for steelhead. So 2 questions; will a 9 ft pole cut it for Steelhead, and is there any difference in quality between a 9 ft Fenwick and a 9 ft Conolon? Thanks in advance!
 
jamisonace

jamisonace

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9' is plenty long, I fish rods between 8'6" and 9'6". People catch steelhead all the time on trout gear. I've never heard of Conolon but Fenwick is decent. You might be overthinking your rod. Line, weight and lure are much more important IMO.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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Agree that 9' is fine for casting (think drifting or plunking bait or plugs) or spinning (think tossing spinners or spoons). A glass Fenwick versus a glass Conolon will weight close to the same. I don't believe that Conolon was around long enough, to produce any graphite rods. But, again, a graphite to graphite comparison would roughly weigh the same. However an E-glass rod will weigh more than S-glass rods will. And Fenwick's Supreme Glass product line were S-glass rods. Which are thin walled and hollow. Personally I would choose ANY brand of S-glass rod over any other glass rod, or any graphite rod. S-glass blanks are light and have a great deal of flex!

That's maybe an information overload. Suffice it to say that either of the rods you have would do the trick. Take both. Not just in case you break one; but to compare and see what works best for your style.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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P.S. You can effectively cover pretty much all holding water, with a combination of spinners and spoons. Spinners for riffles and tail outs; and spoons for bouncing into the deeper water and pockets.

The very best thing you can do--to get up to speed quickly--is get the following books. Read Jed Davis's book first. Then look at Fishing in Oregon, and read about the places you want to fish (which streams). Then read the other books as time allows.

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troutdude

troutdude

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And like Lt. Columbo...just one more thing...LOL

One of those books above is available on the cheap right here. I'll let you figure out which.

 
hobster

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People do catch steelhead with trout rods but it’s not something you want to do often. I would go with an 8-12 lb 9 foot rod. Depending on which type of fishing you are doing the rod size can matter. If you are bank fishing with a bobber you might want a little more length. Here are a few of the books in my dorky collection:

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hobster

hobster

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Just to throw it out there, I’ve had a blast landing steelhead on the bank with this 11 1/2 ft. rod. 6-10 pound rating. Don’t think they make em anymore, but I got 2 super cheap a few years ago. Line mending is a breeze and half the time my line goes directly to my bobber without any line laying on the water. Super quick hookset. Lotsa fun, just look out for trees😜

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