sun rise o sun set

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FishWenKan

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Oct 12, 2008
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Hello forum! from what i skimed threw this sound like the place to B.

I dont fish much jus wen i kan but I was wonderin if the fish'l bite at last light wen i got time to fish. I'll ether b around Danby-Oxbow Or Carver-Barton... r these areas any good at at last light or even at all?
Great Forum by the way!:clap:
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Hello FishWenKan. That is a pretty good screen name. Welcome to OFF, hope you can get enough time to fish often, as you mentioned The Clackamas...If you will be headingto Barton, you may as well hit Eagle Creek. The Coho stack up in there fairly often, and lots of folks catch fish up there. If you think about Barton or Carver, at least drive up to the Creek, and check things out. It can be a very productive place. The times I prefer to target fishm are the first light, and last light bites. Seems the fish are more willing at those particular times, and they are on the move during those hours. Hope you can get out there!
 
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FishWenKan

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ya i was thinkn about headin to Bonnie Lure but I've never been there is there a walk and is it crowded I dont like the combat thing. r there fish still around Carver dont want to bother stoppin there if ther aint.
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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The CLack is going to have blasters in it, or fish with one thing on their minds...Sniffing out theirhome Creek. Bonnie Lure is a Combat Zone and a half, but I kill fiush below the elbow bangers, by wading down about a quarter river mile, almost to the mouth. Willing, aggressive biters hold in riffles, and should take your gear, if presented correctly, and if you head them off before they see the snag zones. It is just how it is during the Coho season, but you can get away from it, by being smarter than the rest of 'em... Wade, down, and be aware, as the Creek is building more hydraulic pressure every day. Eagle Fern park is also another go to for many people too. Check them out.
 
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FishWenKan

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kool thanks!! i'll prolly go check it out i dont own waders tho will i need a pair?
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Yes, unfortunately you will need waders on Eagle Creek, and the Sandy too. It will make fishing much easier, and way more productive if you can get in the water, and either get a better angle, or just get away from others. If I were you I would hit craigslist, and buy a pair. If you want to go new, don't spend more than 100 bucks, for how often you will use them FroggToggs, or similar will do you fine. It is an absolute must to have waders, and wading boots. On CL I have found nice waders for 25 bucks, and new wading boots are like 30 at Fishermans. So 50 bucks, and you can have the best piece of mind that you can have while standing in a bitter cold, high pressure waterway.
 
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FishSchooler

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I dont have waders... when I was at riverside, I just stood in the ice cold water like a man... :lol: Same at tanner creek. I do have 2 pairs of water proof pants, one of them is really good, can bairly feel any water if you soak it. So if I wear the bad on the outside, then good on the inside, I would probably feel almost no water... Problem is the shoes. Has any of you tried the "traditional" waders aka, a garbage bag? My mother doesn't want me to get those waders cause she thinks that they are deadly cause if water gets in, it stays in and makes you sink... I'm left to waderless or the waterproof pants with wet feet...:(
Although I do have an old pair of mostly leather shoes I could weird, I'm hopeless... kinda... :(
 
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bir48die

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Waders have a belt to keep the water from coming in (or at least a fast rate). If there is a worry, put on a jacket. My son and I have waded across the river in the dark to get to our spot and we just pack a float device in case we did hit a low spot.
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Waders are an essential portion of your fishing gear. Riverside, in the Summer, is nothing. The water is over 50 degrees, and hypothermia, let alone frostbite, are the last thing on my mind when I wade in shorts out there. The fall is a different story, any infiltration could potentially be detrimental to your wellbeing. Hypothermia sets in rapidly in the cold weather, standing in ice cold mountain runnoff, or a glacially fed river is just asking for help in bringing it on sooner, if not properly prepared. Waterproof pants are good for the rain, not the river. I have seen a lot of hypothermia, and even frostbite a few times in Oregon, on the Clackamas, and Sandy Rivers. Maybe you could mow a few lawns, or do some yard work for a neighbor, and earn some cash to buy a set if you are serious about fishing this fall. Craigslist has the waders, but the boots may have to be purchased new, but still, they are cheap for footwear, under 30 bucks.
 
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FishSchooler

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My mother says the "fabric" used to make the main parts might not be entirely waterproof.... :think: I don't know where to go cause I dont have any waders or anything. Riverside was good cause I didn't have to actually wade to get to the spot. I dunno where to go without wading... :(
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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Never seen studs for less than 70 or so, but I have seen felts, commonly for 20-30 bucks...They are not super fancy, but I owned a pair of 30 dollar felts a while back, and they lasted all through winter Steelheading, and into the Spring Chinook, then Summer run of Steel too. Its true that you won't need waders, but getting room at the public access points will surely require at least a shin deep mosey in the Creek. There are fish everywhere in the Clack, you can spot a ton of fish at Carver if they are movin by. Didn't see many today, but they are in there, for sure.
 
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FishFinger

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Waders in my humble opinion are a must, for both comfort and safety. I've herd the myth that chest waders are dangerous. That you'll get swept away in the current. I firmly disagree. Water weighs nothing in water. Hip boots by virtue of their bulk could make swimming difficult, however you could drown in street clothes just as easy as chest waders.

Personally, I think waders are a necessary part of your gear especially if your engaging in fall, winter, and spring fisheries. Even if you never step foot in the river, keeping dry in essential. Once you get wet it's difficult to retain your body heat and that can put you at risk of hypothermia.
 
Troutski

Troutski

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Amen to that...

Amen to that...

Waders in my humble opinion are a must, for both comfort and safety. I've herd the myth that chest waders are dangerous. That you'll get swept away in the current. I firmly disagree. Water weighs nothing in water. Hip boots by virtue of their bulk could make swimming difficult, however you could drown in street clothes just as easy as chest waders.

Personally, I think waders are a necessary part of your gear especially if your engaging in fall, winter, and spring fisheries. Even if you never step foot in the river, keeping dry in essential. Once you get wet it's difficult to retain your body heat and that can put you at risk of hypothermia.

I second that .....don't leave home without them.

Chuck
 
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FishSchooler

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Can someone tell me a good spot including:doesn't require getting wet(i think I get the point... :lol:), not a giant hike, like the hike at riverside was a good distance, and a good chance of me getting my first salmon. Please? :pray:
 
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FishFinger

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Can someone tell me a good spot including:doesn't require getting wet(i think I get the point... :lol:), not a giant hike, like the hike at riverside was a good distance, and a good chance of me getting my first salmon. Please? :pray:

Dodge Park
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

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Less than 50 feet from the Santiam River! :)
Secondhand is secondhand

Secondhand is secondhand

My mother says the "fabric" used to make the main parts might not be entirely waterproof.... :think: I don't know where to go cause I dont have any waders or anything. Riverside was good cause I didn't have to actually wade to get to the spot. I dunno where to go without wading... :(

Ok, the best I can do for you,FishSchooler, is to tell you that I prowl the Goodwills and other thrift stores for "treasures". I was in the one at 82nd & Causey,over by Clackamas Town Center,yesterday. In the costume section there was a pair of Hodgman chest waders for like $30. They were size small. I figure if you are eleven years old, they should be about the right size. I checked them out, no holes I could see. If you can get your hiney over there,you may be able to pick them up. I also see waterproof fishing boots in these stores all the time. If you by them and then find something wrong you can take them back. They won't give you any cash, but they will give you a store credit. If you don't let your pride get in the way, you can find most anything in there. Besides, what is the difference between Craigs List and thrift stores? Secondhand is secondhand! Hope this helps.
Barb
 
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Kodiak

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Maybe an option

Maybe an option

Schooler, they make wader pants that are kinda like nylon, and they have abelt that sinches tight at the top. They are light weight and not a full chest wader and might set your moms mind at ease. All I use for wading boots is a pair of cheap sneakers from wall mart. try and find one with a bit of an aggresive tred on them.

Good Luck
 
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Justluck

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yamhill county
waders

waders

ok guys I recently bought some waist high boots as my friend told me not to buy waders. Then out at cedar creek discover I really should have waders afterall. Can you guys please let me know what kind to get and what to look for when purchasing them. Some say buy the cheap ones 'cause they go bad fast' , while others say definitely pay more for quality.And I guessboots will be needed to , what do I need to look for there as well?
 
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ArcticAmoeba

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You ever heard of Frogg Toggs, I have owned one pair, and a friend has owned like 50. For 99 bucks at Fishermans, they are one of the best, simplest, breathables out there. They have neoprene sock feet, and mine lasted over two years. Maybe fished them 150 or so times in those two years, and finally I split them on a rock. I almost never wear wading shoes, as my feet are a pretty picky pair of fellas. In the fall, and winter, I always wear them, and the ones I do tend to sway to are pretty cheap. I do need a pair of spikes as I am fishing Eagle Creek all too often, and that place demands respect while wading. Very strange sections of unusually high hydraulic pressure. I have been pretty surprised in my old neoprene guide pants twice now, and the last time was enough for me. At least get some felts, as regular shoe soles have zero ability to grip a rock with even a hint of growth. I wear shoes if I wade for hours on end down by the mouth, but that is different than up high, and I have never gone up there without at least a pair of borrowed felts...Thanks for having concern for my life once or twice.You know who you are.;) So waders help for sure, and if you are not fishing them everyday, don't buy Simms, or anything that makes you think twice about the price. for 100 bucks you can't go wrong with Frogg Toggs or Scotts.
 
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FishFinger

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I remember the first time I crossed the Sandy @ Cedar creek in hip waders. I just made it across with water lapping right to the top. A slow and painfully tense journey etched deep in my fishing essance...

That was like 1980. Stuff like that can stick with ya.

Hip waders won't make it anymore @ Cedar creek. With no flow diverted as in the past, it's just too high. Your gonna get baptized w/o chest waders.

I've had two sets of neoprene. The first was real old school, almost like a wet suit; really tight and a major pain in the butt to get on and off. Rubber that tight can cause a loss of circulation and I sure seemed to get damn cold damn fast on the Clack or Sandy in Feb. Officially retired 5 years ago.

The other was a pair of kinda old school Caddis, they had/have a lot more room inside so I could actually wear layers of clothing under them. But hiking any distance and it became a overheating situation where I poached in my own juices.

Finally I think I have it dialed in (for myself anyways) by sporting a set of NorthxNorthwest breathable. I love that they are light weight and provide enough room to layer clothes and to wool up. I paid about $125.00 @Sportsman about two yrs ago and they are going strong.

The only thing I 've noticed is the fabric tape that protects the seams begging to give after heavy use. I re glued mine as preventive maintenance.

Yep, your gonna need shoes / wading boots. I agree with Arctic, felt is mandatory to help keep your footing on slippery surfaces. Studs are even better. Korkers makes a nice boot with different soles you can swap out. Studs, felt, rubber. It's kinda cool actually.

At a minimum you could build your own set of felt shoes by epoxying a 1/4" thick piece of felt to the bottom. A vintage set of 20th century golf shoes could offer up the metal studs if you wanted to go all out.
 
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