"Squad/Squat" fish anyone?

W

wayamauro

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I have been fishing with these guys along the Rogue river, and anytime they catch one of this type of fish (they say related to the carp?) they feed it to the herons around or kill it and throw it back in the water. They keep telling me they are not native fish and eat the trout eggs. Anybody could let me know where I can find some reliable info as to whether this is the right thing to do or not? Also has anyone eaten some of these fish?
I appreciate your help,

Martin
 
T

Troutier Bassier

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They are Squawfish but more commonly referd to as Pikeminnow,

No They are not related to carp, they are in the Minnow Family.

They are Native.

They eat Trout Minnows,

Catch one, Kill it.
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

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Nasty lil critters

Nasty lil critters

Squawfish are the most aggressive salmon predators in the northwest. They are one of the few fish capable of eating fish bigger than they are. A bass can only eat a fish one third to one half it's size. A squawfish can not only eat a bigger fish,it can also digest it as fast as it can swallow. They are great fertilizer for your garden if you can stand the smell until you get them in the ground. I usually leave them on the bank for the osprey or raccoons.
Be safe.
Barb
 
T

Troutier Bassier

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They are the worst Salmon Predators,

But there are also smallmouth bass, sturgeon, catfish, largemouthbass, walleye!.
 
W

wayamauro

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Thanks

Thanks

Thanks for your info.

I was doing some research and I found out that they are native species. I feel real bad that my partner killed them, the 2 I caught. There seems to be a bounty on them too. My fishing partner killed them and threw them back to the water...hopefully they were not wasted life and some osprey or heron ate them. Maybe some other fish...perhaps their own kind (I have heard they will do that too, in some occasions, though who knows whether this is true or not...)

I thought they were invasive species. I do understand how they eat salmon and trout smolts, but that reminds me a little of the wolf bounty in the past. I mean, perhaps the dams are the ones that should be destroyed instead of the native fish? I am not a biologist, I am just conjecturing here, but what do you guys think? It just saddens me that life was wasted like that.
Is there any reasonable scientific study as to reducing their population will increase the salmon and steelhead number?

Again, thanks.
 
D

Drew9870

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Thanks for your info.
perhaps their own kind (I have heard they will do that too, in some occasions, though who knows whether this is true or not...)
Again, thanks.

Ahh yes, if it moves (or not) a Squawfish will eat it, I usually try for Sturgeon and Channel Cats in the Upper Willy and use a Squawfish fillet (or two), and all we (my buddies) catch are giant Squawfish over 22 inches (up to 30).

One time, I used a trout fillet, (to make a long story short, I didn't want to waste the trout) and I have never caught a giant Squawfish so soon on a fillet.

I have also experimented with a Live Redside Shiner (native to, and caught from the Willy), and after waiting about 5 mins, I walked away from my pole for 10 secs and look back to see it hanging by the foot tall railing that runs along the dock...... Yet again, a giant Squawfish.

Please get rid of them, especially the giants. Use them for anything, Crawdads, fertilizer, Crab bait, Catfish bait, Cat food :lol:, or trust me, the Racoons WILL do the job, I went to a Gravel pit about a week ago close to where I live, and got seven of them (all over 16 inches) and basically piled them. I came back the next day to find 2 of their skeletons and a half eaten fish.
 
W

wayamauro

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Good to know

Good to know

Well Drew, good to know that at least they are not wasted out there. Thanks for your info.

That makes me think however, about one more thing. Why and how did this life cycle change? I mean, obviously salmon and steelhead were better in the past. Say, for instance, the Rogue River is pretty much clean of pollution (somebody may want to correct me on this one), so, what is it that made the squawfish population get bigger? I read something about it, but then again, I do not know if it is accurate or not. It said that because of the introduction of some invasive species in the rivers, the squawfish had to abandon their natural prey, due to displacement. Now, I am pretty sure, like I said, that the dams have a lot to do with this, and the way they are built. The main mystery to me is to find out how Native Americans dealt with this thing of the squawfish. I know some of the first American settlers ate them, and so did the Native Americans (despite their bony reputation), but, did they experience salmon and steelhead loses due to squawfish? Or is this something new due to our ignorance and treatment of ecosystems? I have no idea, honestly, and that's why maybe some of you may know how all this started. Perhaps is some kind of cycle that comes and goes now and then?

Thanks!
 
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Troutier Bassier

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I saw about 6 Squaws and Small Mouth Bass chasing around some Minnows by a Boat Launch
Bass are a horrible predator too.
 
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jadedbat

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It is my understanding the buggers are not 'native' to the Rogue.

I have heard legend that they were introduced into the Rogue by a pond that was flooded into the Rogue that was full of them.

While they really are cool looking fish,.. especially when they get bigger they do not play by the rules in the streams they live in.

If they were good to eat and put up a decent fight and didn't hurt salmon survival things would be different I imagine.
 
F

FishSchooler

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It is my understanding the buggers are not 'native' to the Rogue.

I have heard legend that they were introduced into the Rogue by a pond that was flooded into the Rogue that was full of them.

While they really are cool looking fish,.. especially when they get bigger they do not play by the rules in the streams they live in.

If they were good to eat and put up a decent fight and didn't hurt salmon survival things would be different I imagine.

They are good to eat...
 
H

HAMBONE

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I too feed them to the local wild life when I happen to hook one. Pesky little rascals. :mad:

It is my understanding as well they were introduced into the Rogue and at one time I knew the story but have since forgotten.

H;)
 

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