Powder coat advice

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beaverfan

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Ok so I went and bought some powder coat to "attempt" to paint up some spinners. I've been messing with the stuff and it's pretty dang cool and it is very very durable. I need to go to Home Depot or something and get some good heat resistant tape. My only question is how the heck do you get a thin even coat? first I tried heating the blades, that didn't work they cool off too fast. So I took two cookie sheets, lined them with alluminum foil, took the racks out of my toaster oven. I take the blades set them on on one of the racks, then grab the heat gun and heat them a little bit and then I take the paint which I've put in a salt shaker and try to sprinkle it on evenly. The salt and pepper shaker helps a lot but there's gotta be an easier way to apply the powder coat.
 
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JeannaJigs

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I've been thinking about getting the stuff to do this myself for jig heads, as of now I've just been buying them pre-painted. Which is simple enough but it gets spendy. I never thought about using it for spinners, but it seems it would work pretty nicely...though I can't think of another way to get an even coat than the way you are currently doing it. I'm sure there is, and I know that there are members that have a lot of experience with powder coating so hopefully they will chime in with their wealth of knowledge and application secrets.
 
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fishnquest

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Pretty cool idea

Pretty cool idea

Jay, that sounds clever and unique. Powder coat is usually cured in an oven. The whole salt shaker thing sounds cool. Think about the process, keep working on it and you will get the bugs worked out. Good luck.
 
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beaverfan

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Ya I think I got it down now. I'll try to post some pics tomorrow. I have been curing them in an oven as per the directions on the paint. At some point I will get a gun as it would save a ton of time. It takes me about ten minutes (half the time is for it to cool off for sanding) to sand and put two coats of paint on a spinners worth of components. If you think the salt shaker idea was cool the way I do it now is even weirder. I have like this syringe thing with no needle, I suck up a little powder then I push it out real quick, the result is a fine "mist" of powder that spreads evenly.
 
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Fishtopher

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Who knows?! Not me!
After you put some on doesn't it blow off when you put more on?
I used to powder coat at the metal shop I worked at...some of the most messy crap ever!

:shock:Make sure you dont breath that crud in!!
 
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fishnquest

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I have heard of powder coat cooking in the oven. Back in the days when I was restoring my 67 camaro I was interested, but my wife would kill me if I cooked paint in the oven; the very idea was outside the realm of possibility:lol:
 
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Anyfishisfine

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The guns work with static electricity. You hook a ground wire to what you are coating, and the gun charges the paint power positive so it sticks.

It seems like a guy could come up with something DIY for that.
 
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ClearCreek

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powder painting

powder painting

Ya I think I got it down now. I'll try to post some pics tomorrow.


Beaverfan:

I would really appreciate it if you would post some photos of your painting process and the results. I am thinking of doing the same thing - powder painting some spinner blades. I have powder painted some spoons before and they came out OK. Some seemed to have a pretty thick coat of paint while others were fine. With the spinner blades I don't want that thick coat I experienced with the spoons. I am going to experiment with a syringe as you mentioned, sounds like a good idea!!

I cured the spoons in the oven by hanging them on the over rack with those little wires you use for Christmas tree decorations - seemed to work fine.

ClearCreek
 
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GDBrown

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Powder Coat Painting

Powder Coat Painting

The guns work with static electricity. You hook a ground wire to what you are coating, and the gun charges the paint power positive so it sticks.

It seems like a guy could come up with something DIY for that.

The Harbor Freight web site shows that they sell a system for about $70 and a pound of paint for $5. There are several web sites that have How To directions for it.

Looks like fun, maybe in my next lifetime I'll take the time to try it. Right now I have enough to do making flies and fishing.
Oh, and a little time at work too.:lol:
The wife says, "Don't forget the Honey Do list.:mad:

GD
 
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JeannaJigs

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I have like this syringe thing with no needle, I suck up a little powder then I push it out real quick, the result is a fine "mist" of powder that spreads evenly.


That's how they do acrylic nails :) lol. Seems like a pretty simple method
 
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beaverfan

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The Harbor Freight web site shows that they sell a system for about $70 and a pound of paint for $5. There are several web sites that have How To directions for it.

Looks like fun, maybe in my next lifetime I'll take the time to try it. Right now I have enough to do making flies and fishing.
Oh, and a little time at work too.:lol:
The wife says, "Don't forget the Honey Do list.:mad:

GD

That's funny, I got a bunch of the paint from Harbor Freight. I also got some more expensive stuff from Jann's Netcraft. I should have been more clear about my process, and yes when I get a chance I will posts pics of the process and the finished product. Here is a step by step of my "full" process so far.

1. I take a toaster oven rack that I place upside down on my work bench. I put foil down under the rack to catch the excess paint. Also I take sand paper to rough up the blades a little bit.

2. I spread out the blades on the rack.

3. I heat the blades with heat gun for about 10 seconds.

4. I take my salt shaker with paint in it and sprinkle the blades as evenly as possible.

5. I heat the blades for a min or two, until all paint has melted.

6. When the blades have cooled for a few min. I take a extra fine sandpaper too them.

7. Then I take my little syringe concoction and put on a real thin second coat.

8. Then I throw them in the toaster oven on 400F for 20-25 min.

My process will continue to change as I get better stuff. I am looking about getting a gun but it might be a while. Also I'm waiting on my order of clear coat.
 
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hendrixfan

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A few places sell a powder coat airbrush that looks good, and for jigs I would think a powder paint fluid bed would be pretty awesome.
 
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FishSchooler

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Im wondering how you do this with jigs. Most jigs are lead, and lead melts way too fast. :think:
 
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hendrixfan

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I have never tried it with lead, but assume that the melting point for lead is much higher than powder paint(which is the low 300s).
 
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GraphiteZen

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I was under the impression the powder paint stuff was for lead. Are you talking about the stuff that comes in the little plastic containers? I use it for jig heads and it works great, but every color has it's own optimum melting temp. If you get the surface too hot before you dip it in the powder it will bubble. I get a reliable method of heating the surface then determine how long it should be exposed to the heat before dipping. That helps establish some consistency. For any powder that is left on the surface but hasn't melted I would bet one of those small butane torches you use for fine metal work would be great as it's a clean flame and won't discolor to paint like a Bic lighter will. Just light it up and flash it back and forth across the surface.
 
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beaverfan

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I use a heat gun I got at Harbor Freight. It works good and there's no flame at all.
 
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ClearCreek

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The melting point of lead is 622 degrees F. As someone mentioned powder paint works when metals, etc. are a little over 300 degrees F. So you don't need to get lead hot enough to melt to make the paint work correctly.

ClearCreek
 
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GraphiteZen

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The melting point of lead is 622 degrees F. As someone mentioned powder paint works when metals, etc. are a little over 300 degrees F. So you don't need to get lead hot enough to melt to make the paint work correctly.

ClearCreek

But you should be really careful you don't get the lead hot enough to melt, and you can do it easily with just a Bic. It's a good thing I'm fast or else I would literally have a hole in my leg. A half ounce of hot lead will ruin your night!!
 
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FishFinger

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Do you have any way to weight the blades before and after?

Hurry up and post those pictures..lol.

I heated and dipped a blade once.. Hated my results and never tried it again.

Troutski has some powder coating skillz, I think he uses that electrical voodoo stuff tho.
 
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