New to Newport, need help/advice.....

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fishfreak13

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Feb 21, 2009
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We just moved to Newport last week. We've already scouted out Big Creek reservoirs and have everything ready for the first trout stocking. Where we lack in info is saltwater. We don't have a boat, so are limited to public docks and the jetty I've read about. Where are these located? There are docks and jetties all over the place and we dont know where the mentioned "public fishing docks" and "south jetty" are located. This is getting winded, I know, but please bear with a fellow hungry fisherman. Once these docks and jetty are found, what do we use? I've read soft plastics are good for rockfish. What kind of baits work well? rod type/size? lb test? sinker type/sizes? Nothing is worse than buying a bunch of terminal tackle and realizing you have all the wrong stuff, so we are at your mercy, begging for your knowledge! :D

Thank you very much and may the fish flock to all of you!
 
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GraphiteZen

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Mar 21, 2008
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Corvallis, Oregon
Hey there welcome to the site!

I know of a public dock that is at the south marina. Both the marina and the dock are next door to Rogue Brewery. Great Food I hear.

The white building is the brewery and the dock is above and to the left.

To get to the south jetty head south over the bridge, hang a right on Abalone Street and then a left on 26th.

BE CAREFUL!! Sneaker waves are bad around there and the rocks are very slick. If you can spend the money, either buy some felt soled wading boots or some cheap sneakers, replacement felt soles and Shoo-Goo. People get knocked off and drown frequently, rubber soled anything is literally the worst thing you can wear.

I don't usualy see many people fishing off the pier as there aren't many rocks and it's a bit shallow but lot's of crab pots.

Have fun!
 
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fishfreak13

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Feb 21, 2009
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Thanks for the advice on hazards as well. We live on 36th st. and just a short walk from the water. The north jetty can be seen from where we hit the beach, now that I know that's what I've been looking at. I'll take a stroll when the weather lets up a bit and toss a line. I will post updates on both the jetty fishing as well as the trout fishing from big creek reservoir 1&2 which are also a short walk away.
 
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SNDSLGR

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Mar 21, 2009
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Pacific NW
I will be in Newport for the day next thursday. What size gear can I bring to get me into the fish? (ie trout, salmon, or sturgeon size)

South Jetty sounds like the best and safest bet, do you need to cast far enough that I need my 12' surf pole? Is there a bait shop guru I should seek out or just grab some soft jigs? If so, what size and what color? If bait is the trick, what is the rig?

Thanks, I will give props with pics if I am successfull.
 
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Dichrofisher

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Yewgene
Are you fishing the actual jetty? I have gotten by with large trout gear. You don't need to cast a mile, sometimes about 5 feet out will get you into some greenling or perch. Jetty structure is right below your feet and out from that is just sandy bottom once the jetty pile ends. Not much out there. Or are you fishing the surf out on the end of jetty? Watch out for sneaker waves, i'd start on the fingerlets of the jetty. Squid strips will stay on the hook, sandshrimp seem to be the most effective. Search the archive for jetty, Ling cod, we have some good discussions on the subject.
 
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SNDSLGR

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Mar 21, 2009
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Pacific NW
Thanks, I think I have read the whole section, lol. I think I will be starting on the fingers... seems safest for a first timer.
 
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lechner

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Jun 29, 2008
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Location
Portland, OR
If you can spend the money, either buy some felt soled wading boots or some cheap sneakers, replacement felt soles and Shoo-Goo. People get knocked off and drown frequently, rubber soled anything is literally the worst thing you can wear.

Huh, I've been out a dozen times or so and have never run into much of an issue with my rubber soled neoprene xtratuffs. That seaweed that looks like green astroturf is one big exception, but I'm skeptical of any sole lacking metallic studs would handle that ice-like surface effectively. I haven't tried anything felt soled though and will get a pair if you think they could outperform my boots in the nonslip department. :)

Ideal footwear aside, I definitely can't stress the importance of being mindful of your footing and what the ocean is doing. Avoid stepping on seaweed and be extra cautious when a rock looks wet.
 
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fourgotten

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Mar 2, 2009
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Eugene, OR
I will be in Newport for the day next thursday. What size gear can I bring to get me into the fish? (ie trout, salmon, or sturgeon size)

South Jetty sounds like the best and safest bet, do you need to cast far enough that I need my 12' surf pole? Is there a bait shop guru I should seek out or just grab some soft jigs? If so, what size and what color? If bait is the trick, what is the rig?

Thanks, I will give props with pics if I am successfull.

You might talk to the people down at Harry's Bait and Tackle in Old Town...
 
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lechner

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Jun 29, 2008
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Portland, OR
+1

The folks who run Harry's are a salty but helpful bunch. They gave me an excellent overview (including a diagram of rigs) the first time I went fishing on the jetty and they carry all the tackle you might need.

In terms of bait fishing, I prefer using a fish finder rig which consists of:

  1. A barrel swivel that attaches to your main line
  2. About 8" of line
  3. Two dropper loops separated by approximately 12" to 18" of line
  4. About 8" of line
  5. A snap swivel on the end
  6. Some lead attached to the snap swivel

So it looks something like:

mainline -> swivel -> line -> loop -> line -> loop -> line -> swivel -> weight

Attach #2 pretied baitholder hooks to the dropper loops and use a weight ranging from 1/2 oz to 2 oz. You can find these rigs already tied ranging in size from 10# to 30# which makes setting up a little more convenient.

Sand shrimp are like crack cocaine to greenling and perch, but are kind of hard to bait up in such a way that they stay on the hook for any amount of time. I like tying them down to the hook with about 12" of magic stretchy string. GULP! makes soft plastic imitation bait but I still haven't caught anything using them.
 
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fourgotten

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Mar 2, 2009
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Eugene, OR
mainline -> swivel -> line -> loop -> line -> loop -> line -> swivel -> weight

Attach #2 pretied baitholder hooks to the dropper loops and use a weight ranging from 1/2 oz to 2 oz. You can find these rigs already tied ranging in size from 10# to 30# which makes setting up a little more convenient.

Sand shrimp are like crack cocaine to greenling and perch, but are kind of hard to bait up in such a way that they stay on the hook for any amount of time. I like tying them down to the hook with about 12" of magic stretchy string. GULP! makes soft plastic imitation bait but I still haven't caught anything using them.

Sand shrimp are best threaded along the leader by inserting the hook at the middle of the joint with the terminal fin of their tail and then just curling them up along the hook so that it comes out their mouth... slide them all of the way past the hook,... they'll last for more than one cast that way...

I agree with the fish finder rig... it's my go-to for surf, 'cept I use three-way swivels at each junction because the dropper loops don't seem to hold up to my harder casting techniques... I've sent more 4-oz pyramids flying down the beach than I care to count... lucky that I haven't brained anyone yet... I also use 50-lb mono on them....
 
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