New to fly fishing, and trying to figure out the gear.

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EsotericForest

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While looking for fly reels through amazon, I came across one that was suggested, here...

Amazon.com: Okuma Sierra Fly Reel: Sports & Outdoors

Due to my overall ignorance, I'm not sure what the size numbers mean exactly (105/12, 150/20, 160/20, ect), and I was wondering if somebody could enlighten me. From other reading I've done, I believe I'm going to just start simple with the normal medium action rod, 8' - 9' long, using WF 5-6 lb. line. Since I don't have a clue what I'm doing, I want something that will be good middle ground for starting out, and give me a decent range of options.
 
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Sinkline

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Are you speaking of a getting a setup for trout use, or other type fish? Will you fish stream, lake, or both?

The numbers you quoted are in reference to the amount and size braided backing that will fit on the reel under the flyline. Those numbers are just a rough estimation as different brands of backing and flyline types have different diameters.


Randy
 
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GDBrown

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What to Buy for Starters

What to Buy for Starters

I use a very similar reel to that with my 5wt, mine is from Cabels and it is a little wider so it holds more line. Most reels on the market are designated for the size/wt of the fly line it will be used with. The one you have been looking at is fine to start with and will last several years if well cared for. They are available at Bi-Mart for about $35.00 right now. When paired with the "Pflueger Purist" rod in 5wt it makes a good inexpensive outfit for trout and is basically what I used last Saturday to land an 18 inch Redside on the Deschutes. Another reel that works well and has for years is the "Pflueger Medalist 1400" series.

Pflueger Fishing Tackle

It sounds like you are headed in the right direction to "The Dark Side":shock:

Welcome Aboard,

GD
 
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GungasUncle

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Like I mentioned in the primer you linked to - the Sierra is a good reel. Another option that you might consider, is another reel I recently picked up - the Cortland CDM. The CDM's are also disc drag reels, but they're a mid-arbor design, which means, the arbor the line is wound around is larger, and thus lets you bring more line in with each crank of the reel - a nice thing when you're playing a fish from the reel. The other big benefit to the mid and large-arbor reels, they cause looser line coils and your lines don't take on as much memory being wound on the spools. That's why I like the mid and larger arbor reels as much as I do.

For general trouting - you don't *need* a disc drag reel, but when you can get a good disc drag reel for $50 or less, why not get one? The Sierras are great reels. I've only had my CDM for about a month now - and I've only got to use it a few times, but I like it. My only complaint is the kind of sharp edge on the bottom reel frame member - it abraided my fly line because I made a stupid mistake of stripping line while I was casting, and ran the line right over that edge (bad idea!). It's a cheap line though, so I'm going to just keep using it until it really wears out.

Give the folks at WW Grigg a jingle and see what kind of rods they've got on hand - you might be able to get a 5 or 6 weight rod that normally sells for $100 for 30-50 right now, maybe less. Their IM6 rods are great rods, I've owned 2 and still own one of them.

Otherwise, if you're looking for a rod that is around $100 or less, you can look at Cabela's if you don't mind a rod made in Korea or China - I have a Cabela's Wind River (also on sale, normal $89 rod, on sale for $45) 8'6" 4 weight that I'm really falling for. I used to own a Three Forks (their entry level) rod that was a gem. I've also had their Fish Eagle fly rods (100-170 rods) and liked them. TFO Signature Series are good rods. Cortland has some rods for $100 or less that are good. You can head over to Fisherman's Marine and get a Cortland combo that has rod, reel, and line for a good price. Scientific Anglers also has combos that hover around $100 that you can get at Dicks or Sportsman's or Fisherman's (i think Fisherman's carries the Scientific Anglers rods anyway) - if you want to take the guess work out of getting a starter outfit.

If price is an issue - a Pflueger Purist rod will set you back less than $50, or you can head to Bi Mart and get an Okuma or Diawa 9' 5 weight fly rod, medium action, for $40 or less. I've owned that Diawa they sell, and I liked it. Pair it up with an Okuma Sierra and you're golden. You can also get one of the entry level Scientific Anglers lines while you're there and have a good basic, beginner outfit. Contrary to some folks opinion, you don't need a $200+ getup to fish well, or catch fish - and there's no reason to spend a lot of money just getting started with something, until you know you like it, or you can do it. Spending $200 or 300 on your first outfit, only to find you hate fly fishing would be a real pisser. You'll loose half your money reselling the rod in that scenario.
 
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EsotericForest

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Thank you for the helpful advice, I really appreciate it. When I was originally looking up gear selection, it was looking like I'd have to spend a couple hundred dollars to get anything worth having. I don't have a ton of money to spare so saving some money is really helpful, and it's nice to see I do have some less expensive options. You also make a good point concerning the fact of "What if I don't like it?"...it would be a shame to break the bank and find out 2 months later that I hate it. I will probably stop over at Bi-Mart tomorrow and poke around to see what some of my local options are there.
 
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Van

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You should run to the new Cabelas in Springfield and get one of their starter set ups. Something like....

[URL="http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishing/Rod-Reel-Combos/Fly-Fishing-Rod-Reel-Combos|/pc/104793480/c/104762880/sc/105571980/Cabelas-Prestige174-Fly-Fishing-Outfits/732372.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse%2Ffishing-rod-reel-combos-fly-fishing-rod-reel-combos]Cabela's Prestige[/URL]. You will be able to get a few needed accessories/supplies along with the rod.

Or perhaps...

Cabela's Cahill Fly Rod and Reel if you are just after a rod and reel.

Lots of options out there. WW Grigg does make good rods. I still have my old baitcasting steelhead rod that got me my first winter steelhead.
 
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EsotericForest

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Well I stopped into Bi-mart to poke around for a bit, and the guy working in sporting goods was too busy to help me...so I'm going to bring my question to you. While I was there, I noticed that 3 out of 4 of the fly reels they had out on display, were set up for you to turn the reel with your right hand. I found this odd since most people are right handed, in which case you control the reel with your left hand, and hold the rod in your right. Is there some fly fishing technique I am as of yet not aware of that would cause me to hold the rod opposite of what I normally would? The reel that I was considering getting from there appears to be a lefty, which isn't going to fly for me...no pun intended ;).
 
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halibuthitman

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most qaulity reels can be switched easily to left hand retrieve.
 
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EsotericForest

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I was wondering if that was also an option. Thank you :)

Going back to my original question about those numbers (105/12, 160/20, ect) which "size" would be a good starter? I hope to do mainly some trout fishing, and probably doing it mostly on streams and rivers.
 
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jimmy

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good to see you looking at getting into throwing feathers. . .

my best advise is to go out and try before you buy, fly rods are like tools and you will regret buying a cheap one ( even thogh the price may sting ) go out with a friend (or one of us) and sample a couple to feel the differences first hand....

I'd recomend a 6wt good rod (8.5' length) and a semi-cheap reel. . .
but, try a few first if you have the ability.

more expensive is not better, cheap is definitely BAD!

$300 for a good rod+descent reel+descent double taper line is my vote
 
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halibuthitman

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Im gonna suggest a rod for you, the fly shop in redding has the finest signature rod line ive ever seen, and most people would be shocked by who builds their rods, but its a gaurded secret:rolleyes: you need a fresh H2O fall river 5wt in 9' , its a 4 piece, with a free spare tip section, and a reel on tube comes with it. if you add one of their $65 reels to the rod they spool it up and load a mastery line on it for free and ship for free. this rod is $129 with a no questions asked warranty for the origanal purchaser... simply the finest flyrod in the world for the money. THE FLY SHOP® - FLY FISHING EQUIPMENT, GUIDE SERVICES, AND INTERNATIONAL FLY FISHING TRIPS call them up on the phone.. they will make it work-;) -Brad
 
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GungasUncle

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Hey Brad - you seem to be in the know who builds those rods - if you'd care to share (even if via PM) I'd like to know. I've got a couple ideas, I wonder if I'm warm.
 
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halibuthitman

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well, once you see the taper and expirence the sensitivety but powerful backbone... and the automatic free tip section... you shouldn't have to guess too hard:D
 
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EsotericForest

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I'll definitely check that out and take it into consideration. Sounds like a pretty good deal.

One question I do have is pertaining to reels yet again. I was in Bi-mart dinking around with a couple of the reels they carry and trying to get a feel for them. While I do like the Okuma Sierra, I was being drawn more to the Okuma SLV 7/8 they had. It just seems to have a better feel to it, and it's not quite so compact. I don't exactly have small hands so having a really small reel feels a little weird (Something about the Sierra that worries me). Now, they don't carry the 5/6 SLV like I would need, but I could order it somewhere online easily enough. My question is, does anybody have any experience with this model? Good feedback? Bad feedback?
 
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GDBrown

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When you are buying both the rod and the reel they should be matched to each other along with the line you are using. The three together determine how it will feels and how well you can control the whole thing when on the water. Brad's suggestion is the best so far. He and Jimmy have more experience than most members when it comes to using a lot of different equipment. Their advise is to be taken seriously. If you get what they suggest and then don't like fly fishing I'm sure you will not have any trouble selling what you get in the forums "Sell" section.
 
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flyshooter

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I got a diawa from bimart for lik 36 bucks and im in love with it. I amnewer to fly fishing(2 years) and started with a twenty dollar martin setup from bimart. I would still use it if i didn't break the tip off. Is that reparable with a new tip guide? Or will it throw the pole out of wack? But anyways i went cheap and it worked for me im still using the reel from the martin set on my new pole. It just landed a 32 inch 12 lb trout last week. My pic shows it. But this is just my setup. Im cheap thank you economy but im still new too this and will eventually get a better reel and maybe a heavier line pole in the future for the deschutes but thats just my two cents.
 
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flytrekker1007

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In my opinion don't buy cheap. You can buy quality reels and rods online that are on sale or clearance. You can get a nice reel for 100 bucks and a decent rod for 100 bucks, and to some people that is still cheap. My first rod and reel was a Allen and Co reel. Its a small local company that makes pretty sweet reels. My first rod was a St. Croix triumph. They work ok but my new rod turns the line over way nicer and really presents a good fly. I now have a TFO finesse rod and a Lamson water works Guru 2 reel and I love them both. Everyone can say they like there setups because they work well for them, or they have bought cheap stuff and don't fish it a lot so it doesn't wear out as fast, or they have never felt what a good rod feels like. the best way to find what works well for you is to go to a fly shop and see if they will let you cast some of there rods, and then get on the internet and find that same rod you liked from the fly shop for a cheaper price.
 
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GungasUncle

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$200+ is way too much money to spend on a type of fishing you're just getting your feet wet with unless you're rolling in cash. Not all of us advocating starting "cheap" are inexperienced. Personally, I've had the opportunity to fish with everything from South Bend to Sage. A beginner to fly fishing simply will not see appreciably better performance out of a $300 setup than they will a $70 outfit, and once the fly is on the water - it doesn't matter what the stick in your hand cost. The fish simply don't care, and will never be impressed with what the decal on your rod says. $70 (or less) plus money spent on some casting lessons will put someone heads & shoulders above the guy who simply goes to the fly shop and plunks down money for a "good" (expensive) getup.

The only place I would say not to skimp on cost for a beginner is the fly line, you can use a cheap reel, and a Goodwill gotten rod, but a cheap fly line is going to be more cumbersome than a cheap rod or reel. Cheap lines will have too much memory, they'll wear out faster, won't float as well, or turn over as well. And you can get "good" lines pretty inexpensively if you hunt for sales.

The old Pfleuger Summit rod I owned for over a decade did last, and unless the fellow I sold it to stepped on it, I'm sure it's still catching fish. It wasn't the prettiest rod, or the lightest, but I worked the dog **** out of it and it never wore out. For a $30 rod it was a steal. Farm pond bass & bluegill to Yellowstone River cutthroats, that rod simply worked.

Also - the advice to fondle at the flyshop and turn around and buy rods online won't garner much of a friendship with the flyshop guys, and if enough people do that, the fly shops will go away, or the owners will simply be much less willing to let you try before you buy. It's a slap in the face to the flyshop owner to vampire his time and energy like that, only to turn around and buy your new gear from some internet retailer across the country.

Not everyone is going to like fly fishing, or be able to master the casting, no matter how hard they try, or how many classes and clinics they attend. To tell them to drop $200+ on a rod & reel that they're going to wind up reselling is doing that person a dis-service. They'll never see their money back when they go to sell it. It's like telling a new driver to buy an Audi R8 instead of the Honda Civic, because the Audi is a way better car, it's more expensive, and better built. It's not a bad thing to work your way up to "higher performance" gear, especially for new casters. Tools only get you so far, it's the talent or lack there of of the person wielding it that is more important. There were plenty of folks at the get together last weekend who were fishing less expensive gear, and still casting beautifully and fishing just fine. In fact, a $100 combo outfished everyone else :)

There is simply no point buying expensive gear until you know fly fishing is your thing, especially given the actual quality of the "low end" "cheap" stuff out there today. And terms like "Lifetime Warranty" don't just apply to high end stuff (and it's funny, those high end makers still charge you money to fix or replace gear on their "lifetime warranty" rods. Or they stop production of that line, and you're hosed if they choose not to upgrade, or can't repair/replace the broken part of your rod). The $40 Okuma rod at Bi Mart comes with a lifetime warranty, and the only thing you pay is shipping & handling if you break the rod. Break a high end rod, and you could be looking at $40 to $150 plus the shipping & handling to get your gear replaced/repaired depending on how they want to treat your warranty today.

Because someone promotes beginners easing into the sport without blowing their savings, don't assume they've never used the "good" stuff, or don't know what the "good" rods/reels are like to fish with, eh?
 
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