Invasive species

K
koboabe
donb said:
When I read about the invasive species legislation, I wrote to the Marine Board to make sure I was reading the rules correctly. They informed me that each person paddling alone in an unpowered, unregistered craft over ten feet had to have their own permit to operate the boat.

I then forwarded my question and their reply to my state sentator and state representative and expressed my opinion of their stupidity in passing this lame law.

I received this reply from them the next day:

"Thank you for your email. I spoke with the Marine Board regarding your concerns. Yesterday, ODFW and the Marine Board met and decided due to significant public concern and wanting the program to succeed that they were dropping the requirement that the name on the permit match the name of the holder. Functionally, a boat owner will be able to buy multiple tags and loan them out to people who borrow the watercraft. Each watercraft will require 1 valid permits. I hope this clears up your concerns. Please let me know if you have any questions."
Sincerely,
Anna Haley
Senior Legislative Assistant
900 State Street S-223
Salem, OR 97301
503-986-1719


So relax, get one permit for your pontoon, canoe or whatever you use, and you can share the boat with any number of people.

If they really want to control invasive species coming into Oregon, put boat inspection stations at the border and inspect every boat entering the state and charge them a fee. Ninety percent of the boats in Oregon never leave the state and therefore will never be importing invasive species. Let the people creating the problem pay for the solution.

glad to hear it
 
T
thepreditor
I thought it is wierd that drift boats and similar dont actually need the permit just one person in the boat needs one (if not registered). Seems like if they were going to do it the boat itself would have to have the permit not just any person in the boat. What does this fee actually do to "prevent" envasive species? Is this money going to put to good use? It just seems like the they went about it wrong. Leave it the ODFW...... good luck
 
T
the salmon kid
i went fishing at the cole rivers hatchery yesterday and was casting a lil cleo and managed to snag a tuiy chub or also known as a golden shiner. i don't think this is good news at all,

they had to poison the entire diamond lake due to the tuiy chub,
i know that they have them down river and i have caught them down river.,.,but at the hatchery,. ive never seen them come up this far, wont they eat the salmon eggs up there?,..:think:

so i took the fish to the people working at the hatchery and they said that this was very bad news, and i called the odfw office and left a message for them,.:think:

what does this mean?:think:

what do you think we should do to stop these invaders?:think:
 
  • tue chub.jpg
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T
tnffishman
man that sucks, I myself always feel bad just killing any fish and throwing it into the bushes. On the Pudding River a few years back guys were doin that with pikeminnows. I hope that problem gets fixed right away
 
S
Spydeyrch
I thought tui chubs are native to oregon waters? According to wikipedia they are actually a food source for other fishes.

Tui Chub - Wikipedia

Then again, I could be wrong.

-Spydey
 
B
beaverfan
Spydeyrch said:
I thought tui chubs are native to oregon waters? According to wikipedia they are actually a food source for other fishes.

Tui Chub - Wikipedia

Then again, I could be wrong.

-Spydey

Pretty sure your right.
 
V
viento
Spydeyrch said:
I thought tui chubs are native to oregon waters? According to wikipedia they are actually a food source for other fishes.

Tui Chub - Wikipedia

Then again, I could be wrong.

-Spydey
'Native species' does not mean 'native in all waters within some hokey arbitrary manmade boundary.
Nor does it mean proclaimed-by-bureaucrat-to-be-native-species should be welcomed in all waters without utilizing our knowledge base in our best interests.

Many watersheds cross manmade boundary lines, and there are several ways fish have moved beyond their original waters. Recognizing the value or detriment of any species in a given environment, can have far reaching influences. Having an obscure smelt in California protected at the cost of crippling the productivity
of one of the worlds premiere agricultural regions will directly effect starving people trapped in various dictatorships and inept economies, by increasing the
cost of commodity food staples to aid agencies and charities.

Having Walleye Pike munching on salmon/steelhead smolts throughout the Columbia River system is a good example of human intervention,
with a selfish decision made to introduce an invasive species without forethought, and then bureaucratic controls implemented without thorough research.

Salmonids are vastly under utilized as an economic resource, and fishing for them is a healthy addiction that both the state and private property
owners should take advantage of, by increasing hatchery output, cracking down on egg, smolt and adult fish predators, and giving tax incentives
to successful habitat enhancements done by private landowners.

Put the chubs in a tank at the zoo, replace them with trout, or whitefish, that share some of the chubs diet, while enhancing the fishery.
Cheers
 
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V
viento
tnffishman said:
man that sucks, I myself always feel bad just killing any fish and throwing it into the bushes. On the Pudding River a few years back guys were doin that with pikeminnows. I hope that problem gets fixed right away
Dead fish are great, they feed the food chain whether in the waters, or in the bushes streamside, or on the dinner plate. Win win win situation.
You would take care of rust, dry rot, or mildew in your car or home, or a personal/family medical condition, so its OK for creatures causing damage
to buy dinner the hard way.
Cheers
 
troutdude
troutdude
viento said:
Salmonoids are vastly under utilized as an economic recourse, Cheers

An under utilized resource? Really???

Salmonids have been harvested, nearly to the brink of extinction in many areas.

I'm NOT trying to get political here. But, this should provide some good information that challenges your thought.

http://www.sierraclub.org/habitat/salmon/
 
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V
viento
Hi, salmon numbers can grow, with increased production, reintroduction in former habitat, and management not driven by
political agendas, with the aim to maximize use of waterways, wilderness, and forests, rather than the current trend of
ever increasing restrictions on use and access. Interest in growing the populations and co-operation between private and public sectors to achieve that
should be a no-brainer, but few politicians have ever seen a fish in the wild, let alone know what it takes to get more of them.
I'm not advocating for larger bag limits, rather, investing to produce larger numbers of fish for all to benefit from.
Cheers
 
T
the salmon kid
i don't know how bad this will be but i know that it was a major problem for diamond lake and they had to poison the entire lake because of that fish
 
D
Drew9870
Everyone says there are Roach (Tui Chub) in Crane Prairie, and they haven't gotten out of
control. I don't believe they are much of a river fish, so I doubt they would get out of control.

Just because a fish that has been known to overpopulate is found in a waterbody, does not mean it will overpopulate, conditions have to be right, predators, spawning habitat, etc.
 
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C
colbypearson
i am pretty sure there is not a direct correlation in tui chubs and golden shiners though.... but theres a ton of shiners in howard, if anything they have affected the overall fishing for the better !!!
 
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C
colbypearson
the salmon kid said:
i don't know how bad this will be but i know that it was a major problem for diamond lake and they had to poison the entire lake because of that fish

i would consider it a completely different situation personally, i wouldnt jump to conclusions as fast in a river system as a lake, im no expert and dont get me wrong the diamond lake scenario was a disaster, but there are many relationships where the tui chub is a vital part to some environments even to some trout in other places i doubt they are something new, but no one targets them so there could be many more, or maybe a couple, i remember a while back i used to get all kinds of crazy fish like chubs and pike minnows and all that stuff out of the rivers around here, also you have to consider the habitat available in the rogue pretty swift current and pretty little vegetation, and the chub's are very cover (vegetation) oriented and are not really river material rapid areas i mean anything can adapt to slow moving areas but i would consider the habitat's of the main species we would be worried about as pretty different. but what could be a concern, would be competition for food if they did overpopulate since trout and larger chub's have similar diets this may have been part of the case at diamond as well as just being an overall neuscance..... in my opinion if kept in check these can be a benefit, fish dont get big very fast on bugs and algae. i read that many of the problems is that most trout never get big enough in our lakes to become true predators :think:
i think if more trout fisherman in our lakes practiced catch and release as well as used barbless hooks to decrease mortality rate, we could have "trophy" trout fisheries in our lakes instead of oh look another 10 incher...... ;)

anyways denying the tui chub's past existence in the rogue let alone almost all of our rivers would be ignorant.
 
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B
beaverfan
Are you sure it was Tui Chub and not one of the other species of Chub? The reason I ask is because that photo was used on a blog on Diamond Lake several years ago. There are more than one species of Chub in Oregon including Oregon Chub (Oregonichthys Crameri) which I believe is a threatened species. I did a little research on what species of fish were native to the Rogue but didn't come up with much. Perhaps a call to ODFW is in order.
 
C
colbypearson
beaverfan said:
Are you sure it was Tui Chub and not one of the other species of Chub? The reason I ask is because that photo was used on a blog on Diamond Lake several years ago. There are more than one species of Chub in Oregon including Oregon Chub (Oregonichthys Crameri) which I believe is a threatened species. I did a little research on what species of fish were native to the Rogue but didn't come up with much. Perhaps a call to ODFW is in order.

he contacted ODFW i think already
 
V
viento
Here is a list of most U.S. cyprinidae, lots of 'em to choose from :shock:
alabama shiner
altamaha shiner
alvord chub
amur bitterling
apalachee shiner
arkansas river shiner
arroyo chub
bandfin shiner
bannerfin shiner
beautiful shiner
bedrock shiner
bigeye chub
bigeye shiner
bighead carp
bigmouth chub
bigmouth shiner
black carp
blackchin shiner
blackmouth shiner
blacknose dace
blacknose shiner
blackside dace
blackspot shiner
blacktail shiner
blacktip shiner
bleeding shiner
blotched chub
blue chub
blue shiner
bluefin stoneroller
bluehead chub
bluehead shiner
bluenose shiner
bluestripe shiner
bluntface shiner
bluntnose minnow
bluntnose shiner
bonytail
borax lake chub
brassy minnow
bridle shiner
broadstripe shiner
bull chub
bullhead minnow
burrhead chub
burrhead shiner
cahaba shiner
california roach
cape fear shiner
cardinal shiner
carmine shiner
central stoneroller
channel shiner
cheat minnow
cherryfin shiner
chihuahua chub
chihuahua shiner
chiselmouth
chub shiner
clear chub
clear lake splittail
coastal shiner
colorado pikeminnow
comely shiner
common carp
common shiner
coosa shiner
creek chub
crescent shiner
crucian carp
cutlips minnow
cypress minnow
desert dace
devils river minnow
dixie chub
dusky shiner
duskystripe shiner
eastern silvery minnow
emerald shiner
fallfish
fathead minnow
fatlips minnow
fieryblack shiner
finescale dace
flagfin shiner
flame chub
flathead chub
fluvial shiner
ghost shiner
gila chub
golden shiner
goldfish
grass carp
gravel chub
greenfin shiner
greenhead shiner
guadalupe roundnose minnow
hardhead
headwater chub
highback chub
highfin shiner
highland shiner
highscale shiner
hitch
hornyhead chub
humpback chub
ide
ironcolor shiner
kanawha minnow
kiamichi shiner
lahontan redside
lake chub
largescale stoneroller
las vegas dace
laurel dace
least chub
leatherside chub
leopard dace
lined chub
little colorado spinedace
loach minnow
longfin dace
longnose dace
longnose shiner
manantial roundnose minnow
mexican stoneroller
mimic shiner
mirror shiner
mississippi silvery minnow
moapa dace
mountain redbelly dace
mountain shiner
new river shiner
northern pikeminnow
northern redbelly dace
nueces roundnose minnow
ocmulgee shiner
orangefin shiner
orangetail shiner
oregon chub
ouachita shiner
ozark chub
ozark minnow
ozark shiner
pahranagat spinedace
palezone shiner
pallid shiner
peamouth
peamouth
pearl dace
peppered chub
peppered shiner
phantom shiner
pinewoods shiner
plains minnow
plateau shiner
popeye shiner
prairie chub
pretty shiner
proserpine shiner
pugnose minnow
pugnose shiner
rainbow shiner
red river shiner
red shiner
redeye chub
redfin shiner
redlip shiner
redside dace
redside shiner
redspot chub
redtail chub
relict dace
ribbon shiner
riffle minnow
rio grande chub
rio grande shiner
rio grande silvery minnow
river chub
river shiner
rocky shiner
rosefin shiner
rosyface chub
rosyface shiner
rosyside dace
rough shiner
roughhead shiner
roundnose minnow
roundtail chub
rudd
sabine shiner
sacramento blackfish
sacramento pikeminnow
saffron shiner
sailfin shiner
sand shiner
sandbar shiner
sandhills chub
santee chub
satinfin shiner
scarlet shiner
sharpnose shiner
shoal chub
sicklefin chub
silver carp
silver chub
silver shiner
silverband shiner
silverjaw minnow
silverside shiner
silverstripe shiner
skygazer shiner
slender chub
slim minnow
smalleye shiner
sonora chub
southern redbelly dace
speckled chub
speckled dace
spikedace
splittail
spotfin chub
spotfin shiner
spotfin shiner
spottail shiner
stargazing minnow
steelcolor shiner
streamline chub
striped shiner
sturgeon chub
suckermouth minnow
swallowtail shiner
taillight shiner
tallapoosa shiner
tamaulipas shiner
telescope shiner
tench
tennessee dace
tennessee shiner
texas shiner
thicklip chub
thicktail chub
tonguetied minnow
topeka shiner
tricolor shiner
tui chub
umatilla dace
umpqua dace
umpqua pikeminnow
umpquachub
utah chub
virgin chub
virgin spinedace
warpaint shiner
warrior shiner
wedgespot shiner
weed shiner
western blacknose dace
western silvery minnow
white river spinedace
white shiner
whitefin shiner
whitemouth shiner
whitetail shiner
woundfin
yaqui chub
yazoo shiner
yellowfin shiner
zebra danio

Long live bait! Well, long enough, anyway ;)
 
T
the salmon kid
after me and a couple of buddies looked at the fish everyone said that it was a golden shiner
ya i got the picture offline but i got the picture of the fish that looks exactly like the one i got.
and in the regulations there is a page that says report any unfamiliar and invasive species
so i called them and told them that there is i different species that could make it into the hatchery
i was just concerned about our future fish and their health
and i didn't know that they would come all the way up to the hatchery
 
V
viento
Of the list, only the Virgin Chub is truly endangered
 

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