everyone who loves lingcod and for the beginner who wants to catch em!

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plunkme

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Mar 10, 2008
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110
oh great i added a question about this earlier on jetty fishing... i plan to go out just north of depoe bay off of cliffs where the locals have told me that the lings are spawning, i went there last week and i have caught greenlings of different sizes there, im planning to go again in 2 weeks hoping to catching some ling cods, but anyways, is it better to use live greenlings or should i fillet them and bait it on the hook?
 
D

Dichrofisher

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Jan 16, 2007
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Yewgene
this is by far my favorite fish to catch! in this thread i want to give all the beginners a chance to learn how to fish them.......we all had to start somewhere so lets help others get this far!

first off ill start with what to use!

for your rod i have 2 options, if your fishing in a channel use a shorter rod like a 6 1/2 - 7 1/2' ft rod with a good backbone! these fish are known to be rod breakers! find a reel that is most comfortable for u! dont go to cheap cause these fish know how to destroy equipment. for casting into a deep hole further from you i would suggest a 8-10 ft rod. and again dont go to cheap unless you want to keep buying rods and losing fish!

now for bait i would suggest fresh cut bait like anchovys smelt etc. ive caught a few on glow jigs the 6" rubbers with a 4 oz leadhead with a peice of squid or cutbait. use a very large line! i tend to use a braided line around 30-50lb test! so basicaly when you hook this fish dont let him head for the bottom. he will hang you up everytime. these arent a finnesse fish they are brute power so pull hard! anyone willing to add, lets help the others catch fish
Thanks ! I have only caught them offshore. The only thing I can add is to keep constant pressure on them or they can come loose due to the hook pulling a hole in their mandible, thus the hook backing out.
 
F

FishSchooler

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Can you catch em at garibaldi on the tillamook bay? Would be great for a all out clamming/crabbing/fishing day when the tides are good, like memorial day weekend. I have a 8'6" 15-50 lb rod with 17 lb line, would that be strong enough? Oh yeah, lings are those fish with all the spiky and weird fins... how does one hold them without cutting their selves? I want to show the family what the fish they are eating really lookes like. :shock::lol::shock::lol:
 
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fishndad

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Mar 31, 2009
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coos bay, oregon
i would suggest cutbait! lingcod love cutbait, its fresh and well they will smell the blood! and yes definitely keep constant pressure.
 
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fishndad

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coos bay, oregon
Can you catch em at garibaldi on the tillamook bay? Would be great for a all out clamming/crabbing/fishing day when the tides are good, like memorial day weekend. I have a 8'6" 15-50 lb rod with 17 lb line, would that be strong enough? Oh yeah, lings are those fish with all the spiky and weird fins... how does one hold them without cutting their selves? I want to show the family what the fish they are eating really lookes like. :shock::lol::shock::lol:

im pretty sure you could! if you can find a deeep cavity in a channel then you should have no problem finding some lings! lings arent realy spikey, cabezon are spiky if thats what your thinking of. lings look like an overgrown greenling with a much more aggressive mouth, but yeah they are ugly as can be lol
 
L

lechner

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Portland, OR
Mmm, I have ling cods to thank for my current surf addiction. I took a charter last summer and, even though I spent most of the time either hurling into the big pond or fighting against the relentless urge to hurl, the lings I caught between dry heaves made the trip worth the pain and indignity. Lings are the terrifying creatures that haunt your nightmares with waiting mouths full of razor sharp teeth and a bad disposition. And best of all, they are delicious! How such a monstrous and unseemly beast could be so good to eat is a paradox unique to the ocean: the uglier the critter, the better it will taste with tartar sauce and a slice of lemon.

According to Sherry, the proprietor from the barview jetty store, lings are more prevalent near the end of the jetty which is usually more dangerous to walk out on. These are ambush hunters that hold out in crevices just waiting for an unfortunate fish to wander by.

Thanks for the advice, fishndad. I haven't tried cut bait yet but will give it a shot the next time I hit the surf. BTW, how do you like to work the jigs? My technique (which only rarely produces) is to bounce a 6" single tail grub on a 2oz jig head along the bottom, but I've been thinking that this may be too large for the rock fish that lurk around the same places as lings. Thoughts?
 
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FishSchooler

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Mm... might not have access to fresh bait like that unless I use a sand crab, clam, or mussle... Would they eat some bloody/smelly shrimp? Or a shrimp scented 2.5 or so inch kastmaster (with so much shrimp scent that its almost dripping)? I have never fished for lingcod, and have never seen a real live one (besides pictures). I prefer lures (or the baits that can be easily caught like the ones I mentioned) because they are easier to maintain when you are camping.

Oh yeah, during high tide, garibaldi is mostly sand unless the water comes really close up to the bank. There is a giant pier there though.
 
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fishndad

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Mm... might not have access to fresh bait like that unless I use a sand crab, clam, or mussle... Would they eat some bloody/smelly shrimp? Or a shrimp scented 2.5 or so inch kastmaster (with so much shrimp scent that its almost dripping)? I have never fished for lingcod, and have never seen a real live one (besides pictures). I prefer lures (or the baits that can be easily caught like the ones I mentioned) because they are easier to maintain when you are camping.

Oh yeah, during high tide, garibaldi is mostly sand unless the water comes really close up to the bank. There is a giant pier there though.

yeah i would have to say probably not! if its real sandy they arent gonna be in there! they need places to hide like in rocks, kelp beds etc....... shrimp works great! but even some frozen cut bait works good to. you may need to travel to a rocky area!
 
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fishndad

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Mmm, I have ling cods to thank for my current surf addiction. I took a charter last summer and, even though I spent most of the time either hurling into the big pond or fighting against the relentless urge to hurl, the lings I caught between dry heaves made the trip worth the pain and indignity. Lings are the terrifying creatures that haunt your nightmares with waiting mouths full of razor sharp teeth and a bad disposition. And best of all, they are delicious! How such a monstrous and unseemly beast could be so good to eat is a paradox unique to the ocean: the uglier the critter, the better it will taste with tartar sauce and a slice of lemon.

According to Sherry, the proprietor from the barview jetty store, lings are more prevalent near the end of the jetty which is usually more dangerous to walk out on. These are ambush hunters that hold out in crevices just waiting for an unfortunate fish to wander by. Most people hold lings by the gill plates because the teeth are so sharp.

Thanks for the advice, fishndad. I haven't tried cut bait yet but will give it a shot the next time I hit the surf. BTW, how do you like to work the jigs? My technique (which only rarely produces) is to bounce a 6" single tail grub on a 2oz jig head along the bottom, but I've been thinking that this may be too large for the rock fish that lurk around the same places as lings. Thoughts?


i like to use a twin tail 6" grub! glow in the dark is good, white, chartruese, and black are other colors that work as well! i will work them slow on the bottom and bounce them now and then or just right off the bottom slowly so the enticing tails will attract!
 
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plunkme

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Mar 10, 2008
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Most of these rigs are off the boat non really say anything about jetties oh wells I'll just have to go out and try it for myself next week
 
F

fishndad

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coos bay, oregon
Most of these rigs are off the boat non really say anything about jetties oh wells I'll just have to go out and try it for myself next week

even on the jetty's using the sea trout will work and so will using a jig! i fish mostly from the rocks, so what i explained is my experience from fishing from the jetty's!:D
 
L

lechner

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even on the jetty's using the sea trout will work and so will using a jig! i fish mostly from the rocks, so what i explained is my experience from fishing from the jetty's!:D

Just for the sake of argument though, I've hooked up with a number of tiny sea trout that headed straight for the nearest rock pile/kelp bed/shipwreck/snagcity after swallowing the hook, resulting in either me successfully coaxing them out from varying angles or breaking my line. I doubt this situation is as commonly a problem while in a boat since you can always position yourself on top of the fish or just circle around it until you find an angle that works. This issue is generally inherent with jetty fishing and not specifically the various rigs you could use on live bait.

So other than the whole snagfest thing, it seems like you will want a BIG net since there's a good chance that any sea kitty big enough to try to swallowing your trout has merely clamped down on it and isn't really hooked.
 
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fishndad

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Just for the sake of argument though, I've hooked up with a number of tiny sea trout that headed straight for the nearest rock pile/kelp bed/shipwreck/snagcity after swallowing the hook, resulting in either me successfully coaxing them out from varying angles or breaking my line. I doubt this situation is as commonly a problem while in a boat since you can always position yourself on top of the fish or just circle around it until you find an angle that works. This issue is generally inherent with jetty fishing and not specifically the various rigs you could use on live bait.

So other than the whole snagfest thing, it seems like you will want a BIG net since there's a good chance that any sea kitty big enough to try to swallowing your trout has merely clamped down on it and isn't really hooked.

that is also a great point lechner! but for the guy's who have no boat, may be willing to lose a fish or two for that big beast lying beneath waiting for a meal. but yeah your gonna lose a few fish and a lotta tackle! but well worth the hassle in my oppinion:D
 
Y

yellowjacket

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Nov 3, 2008
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Location
Eugene
Get a grip!

Get a grip!

Mmm, I have ling cods to thank for my current surf addiction. I took a charter last summer and, even though I spent most of the time either hurling into the big pond or fighting against the relentless urge to hurl, the lings I caught between dry heaves made the trip worth the pain and indignity. Lings are the terrifying creatures that haunt your nightmares with waiting mouths full of razor sharp teeth and a bad disposition. And best of all, they are delicious! How such a monstrous and unseemly beast could be so good to eat is a paradox unique to the ocean: the uglier the critter, the better it will taste with tartar sauce and a slice of lemon.

According to Sherry, the proprietor from the barview jetty store, lings are more prevalent near the end of the jetty which is usually more dangerous to walk out on. These are ambush hunters that hold out in crevices just waiting for an unfortunate fish to wander by. Most people hold lings by the gill plates because the teeth are so sharp.

Thanks for the advice, fishndad. I haven't tried cut bait yet but will give it a shot the next time I hit the surf. BTW, how do you like to work the jigs? My technique (which only rarely produces) is to bounce a 6" single tail grub on a 2oz jig head along the bottom, but I've been thinking that this may be too large for the rock fish that lurk around the same places as lings. Thoughts?

Years ago I worked at Alaska Packers in Charleston-on the sand spit, when I/we had to handle big ling we tried to keep away from the mouth or gills. Wearing gloves helps. 1st & last time I held one by the gill covers I put my fingers in too deep & ended up bleeding pretty good- gill plates are like razor wire!!. When bare handed we would usually use thumb & middle finger into the eye sockets or grab where the body meets the tail. For some real nice little treats about scallop size, on the gill plate/cheeks there are silver dollar sized pieces of meat. Some of the finest tasting seafood you can eat. ;)
 
Y

yellowjacket

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Messages
111
Location
Eugene
Get a grip!

Get a grip!

Mmm, I have ling cods to thank for my current surf addiction. I took a charter last summer and, even though I spent most of the time either hurling into the big pond or fighting against the relentless urge to hurl, the lings I caught between dry heaves made the trip worth the pain and indignity. Lings are the terrifying creatures that haunt your nightmares with waiting mouths full of razor sharp teeth and a bad disposition. And best of all, they are delicious! How such a monstrous and unseemly beast could be so good to eat is a paradox unique to the ocean: the uglier the critter, the better it will taste with tartar sauce and a slice of lemon.

According to Sherry, the proprietor from the barview jetty store, lings are more prevalent near the end of the jetty which is usually more dangerous to walk out on. These are ambush hunters that hold out in crevices just waiting for an unfortunate fish to wander by. Most people hold lings by the gill plates because the teeth are so sharp.

Thanks for the advice, fishndad. I haven't tried cut bait yet but will give it a shot the next time I hit the surf. BTW, how do you like to work the jigs? My technique (which only rarely produces) is to bounce a 6" single tail grub on a 2oz jig head along the bottom, but I've been thinking that this may be too large for the rock fish that lurk around the same places as lings. Thoughts?

Years ago I worked at Alaska Packers in Charleston-on the sand spit, when I/we had to handle big ling we tried to keep away from the mouth or gills. Wearing gloves helps. 1st & last time I held one by the gill covers I put my fingers in too deep & ended up bleeding pretty good- gill plates are like razor wire!!. When bare handed we would usually use thumb & middle finger into the eye sockets or grab where the body meets the tail. For some real nice little treats about scallop size, on the gill plate/cheeks there are silver dollar sized pieces of meat. Some of the finest tasting seafood you can eat. ;)
 
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plunkme

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Mar 10, 2008
Messages
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Anyone know what kind of hooks I should use when hooking up live greenlings for lings? Like circle hooks octopus j hooks? And do I need to set the hook when I get a bite or real it in and hope a trailing hook or a skinned hook will hook up?
 
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fishndad

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Mar 31, 2009
Messages
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coos bay, oregon
circle hooks are fine! and just keep constant pressure and a net near by! as soon as they hit the surface they will run
 

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