Battery for trolling motor Question

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hand_on_rod

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Greetings.
I recently aquired a trolling motor and mount for my Sevylor raft, and now I need to buy a deep cycle marine battery and charger.
Does anyone have any advice as to what is a good, reliable, and affordable battery? I've seen once labels maintainence free, is that the way to go? What am I looking for in a charger? Bi-Mart has a Minn Kota fast charger on sale; is that a good one, or do I want a slow charger?
Thanks in advance.
Also, has anyone out there used a trolling motor on an inflatable such as the Sevylor Super Caravelle?
 
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meluvtrout

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I have an inflatable with trolling motor. Sevylor Caravelle? I'm not so sure, but if it's anything like their FishHunter model, then I'd say either get a floorboard cut from plywood over at Home Depot or dump it. Not stable enough to control with a rod and a motor.

For the battery, go with Costco! The best deal in town for deep cycle marine batteries.
 
H

hand_on_rod

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slow your troll

slow your troll

The raft I have is the Super Caravelle 6 person, 10ft raft, which is very similar to the Fish Hunter model. I'm curious what aspect of the scenerio is unstable. Also, how is the floorboard cut from plywood used? Is that for under the battery?
 
T

trollin4trout

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I've seen a small Sevylor raft with an electric trolling motor- that thing was going across Timothy against the wind with ease!

Don't forget, you'll need a license for the raft once you attch a motor.
 
M

meluvtrout

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First of all, don't try to overload the boat. If it says 6 people, they mean 3 or max 4 without rods.When you have a motor and a battery and rods that means you eliminate 2 more people from the boat. So I wouldn't take it out with more than 2 people(including you) in it.
When you hit a wave as a result of one those wake boarding boats, then inflatable boats start shaking side to side. Really dangerous if you have kids on board. Floor boards cut out of thin plywood somewhat reduces the effect but won't eliminate it. Just measure the bottom of your boat, get 2 pieces of plywood cut and sand the sides of the wood really well...

Battery sits inside the boat, infront of the motor mount. Some models come with a battery bag holder, which wouldn't fit a battery anyway...

Does it have rod holders? Also very careful not to poke holes when you're hooking a fish...

Good luck and be safe...
 
F

FishFinger

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I think the notion of "needing" a deep cycle battery for a trolling motor is a bit of a misnomer. The deep cycle aspect is more intended for cold cranking power. More amps available to start an engine. A new 60 month battery should work fine for simply powering a trolling motor.

You'll need a trickle charger to keep the battery topped off between uses as well as to recharge after an extended use. As you weight the costs, buying two 60 month batteries would be close to the cost for one deep cycle and you'd have a fully charged spare for a "full' day of fishing rather letting your single batteries life define the length of your outing.

Melovetrout raised a good point. Having a solid floor is going to massively improve the comfort and reduce the fatigue you'll have crawling along a soft floor. W/o a wood decking you can't stand up, things flop around (ie batteries, gear, coolers, little people ect) with every move. Fabricating a deck out of 3/4 ply would go a long ways towards making the raft more user friendly.

And as trollin4trout mentioned, you'll have to register your vessel if you indeed put a motor on it.. of any kind. You give the state marine board 3 dollars per foot and they let you paint hull numbers on it and give you a tag.

Seem like so much over kill just to push a raft around but it's what they say you gotta do...
 
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S

Silverlion

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^^^^^what he said. I thought about putting a TM on my canoe 'till I found out I had to go through everything, but meet the President to do it. But, Oregon apparantly needs money so the charge/tax everything. Still better here than Texas. Keep it right side up!
 
Troutski

Troutski

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Gel batteries ...

Gel batteries ...

I would recommend a gel style battery, one of the maintenance free ones. They don't leak acid in ruff water and no smell, not to mention the safety factors. Just my opinion...

Chuck
 
T

trollin4trout

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I think the notion of "needing" a deep cycle battery for a trolling motor is a bit of a misnomer. The deep cycle aspect is more intended for cold cranking power. More amps available to start an engine. A new 60 month battery should work fine for simply powering a trolling motor.


Everyone has their theories, so here's mine!

My understanding is that deep cycle batteries are intended for uses where the battery is drained down significantly before being recharged. AND they are intended to be re-charged over and over. A regular car battery will not take that kind of continuous abuse. They are made to have engine starting power and then be maintained in a fully charged condition continuously.

Here's the other things I've read about maintaining your deep cycle battery:

Re-charge immediately after use- don't leave dis-charged for long periods of time.

Check water level and add if needed AFTER charging. (don't overfill- to the "slot" only)

Keep in cool (but not freezing)location- a cold concrete floor does NOT drain a battery (old wives tale)- it's actually an excellent storage place.

Better to not drain more than 50% before re-charging, battery will last longer. ( I violate this on a continual basis- everytime I use it!:naughty:)

That is my .02

Oh- and I did used to buy cheap car batteries for the electric trolling motor- they didn't last long and I wouldn't waste the money to do it again.

Jim
 
F

FishFinger

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T4T I fully understand your logic and perhaps I am wrong in my assessment. However many years ago I had a Zodiac and I ran a 18h 2 stroke & trolling motor. I ran the trolling motor with a deep cell R/V and found it gave me about the same run time as a conventional battery. I was a bit miffed as I was under the impression the extra $$$ spent would increase the over all run time.

I was surprised to learn in a situation with out a alternator; such as with a I/O the additional amperage provided no additional power above the 12 volt DC current supply.

You are correct that a deep cycle is more resilient, lending itself to a longer life on the recharge front. As mentioned above when used in a conventional I/O - RV system the battery is "topped off" while the engine in running as long as the charging system functions properly

Because the OP was addressing powering a trolling motor on a raft, my inclination was only one battery would be used, due to space limitations. I declined to mention the option of using two conventional batteries wired in parallel thus potentially doubling the amount of run time available.

The boat I am currently renovating has a 85h 2 stroke w/ electric start. In this case I definitely will use a deep cycle exclusively for the motor and a second conventional battery to power the lights and other embellishments. Depending on the demands of the system after everything is installed, I'm considering running 2 conventional batteries in tandem and wired parallel as the recharging aspect won't occur while it's on the water.
 
O

OBP Turtle 33

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Deep Cycle Marine Battery from Les Schwab one can pull my bass boat around for a full day unless its high winds than its a bit less. Slow to medium Charger. I was told by Tracker Boat people down in Eagle Point that running the batteries together is not needed but I dont think it will hurt anything and if its better let me know I am always looking for ways to keep me on the water longer LOL
 
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scouternw

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FH360 - same issues - solid floor, troll'g motor...

FH360 - same issues - solid floor, troll'g motor...

Hey folks, the questons and info in this helped me decide which way to run. I picked up a Fish Hunter 360, a MinnKota55 (?? maybe to big for boat) last week and am prepping it for it's maiden voyage. I am making a motor mount and want to do a floor for stability. I found some pix online for the floor - it shows two pieces not a single ??. Battery info still leaves me in a lurch whether to do a deep cycle or regular. Me being the cheap so^ I am, will probably try a regular first. :) Will find out this week when I hit Harriet for a couple days. Say hi to the dummy using paddles vs the motor this week (if it's ready), otherwise it's the kayak agaaain.
 
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Hawk

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Have You Kissed a Bass Today???
Last year fer my Minnkota Edge 50lb thrust bowmount foot control, i bought a deep cycle Maxx 29 from Wallyworld (walmart) fer $74 & put it in a $5 plastic battery box. I don't have an inflatable though. I have a alumacraft 16' lunker. The Minnie moves my boat aroun reel well. I've been mighty happy with it & the battery so far.


I read on a website that the Maxx29 Everstart batteries are made by Johnson Controls (one of the 3 major battery CO.)


Best O Luck on yer choice Bro......................:D
 
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