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  • Newbie help

    I'm from out of state and wanted to come and try fly fishing by wading for steelhead. I would not want to come in the middle of the winter because I also want to do some sight seeing. So...spring, summer, fall. The Dechutes is famous but it sounds like access is limited and you need to float and then beach a boat and wade. I think the N. Branch of the Umpqua may work as there is roadside access. The Rogue, it sounds like that may be a drift boat situation. I may use a guide one day and then try wading on my own for the other days. Another issue is if any areas require any sort of lottery.
    It seems the largest steelhead are in the winter but as I said I really don't want to be out in mid-winter.
    Any suggestions would be very much appreciated, what I am looking for is..
    1. Try Stream XYZ in the month of XXX, lots of roadside access and shallow enough to wade and also shallow enough to use fly tackle.
    Thanks for any help. Appreciate it.

  • #2
    Welcome to OFF.

    You would not want to try wading, in the winter. High and fast water, is not a good mix. I don't think that I've ever seen anyone, wading in winter waters.

    I'd suggest the world famous McKenzie River, east of Eugene. It's very scenic, with trails, waterfalls, the infamous "Blue Pool" and more. And if you prefer the beauty of the Oregon Coast; the Siletz River is another good option. And there is the Clackamas River system, to the north. With scenery all around, in the Mt. Hood National Forest.

    Good luck, and let us know how you do.

    P.S. You can look up those rivers, and many more, in our archived threads. Just use the Search engine, at the top of this page.

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    • #3
      The North Umpqua has one heck of a summer steelhead run, and a designated fly fishing only area, but I am not sure about a guide service that runs that stretch of the river. If you are going to be doing some site seeing, then I would suggest a couple of rivers, don't limit yourself to just one.

      As for a lottery, I am assuming you mean a draw tag type system. Oregon doesn't have one that I know of. All you need is a fishing license and your salmon steelhead validation (plus possible a CR endorsement if you choose a river up north). That should let you fish anywhere in Oregon, but make sure that you pick up a copy of the regulations, since they will change from water body - water body.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by richellealessi12
        Welcome red ow'

        You would not have any desire to have a go at swimming, in the winter. High and quick water, isn't a decent blend. I don't imagine that I've at any point seen anybody, swimming in winter waters.

        I'd recommend the world well known McKenzie Stream, east of Eugene. It's extremely grand, with trails, waterfalls, the notorious "Blue Pool" and the sky is the limit from there. Furthermore, on the off chance that you lean toward the excellence of the Oregon Drift; the Siletz Waterway is another great alternative. Also, there is the Clackamas Waterway framework, toward the north. With view all around, in the Mt. Hood National Timberland. Good fortunes, and let us know how you do.
        Umm...isn't that pretty much exactly, what I had already said???

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        • #5
          Hi everyone newbie here I hope this will be my exciting forum for my interest in fishing...

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          • #6
            Wilson River has some great steelhead fishing. Tony

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Casting Call View Post
              Wilson River has some great steelhead fishing. Tony
              I'm watching the calendar, can't wait!

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              • #8
                I have waded in the winter but i am over in eastern oregon. My first steelhead trip and wading experience was in december. Grande ronde river is supposed to be a world class fishery. According to a good friend of mine anyways. Be worth checking out at the right time.

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                • #9
                  Thanks everyone for the help. I should have been a little more precise in what I was asking. I've done a lot of trout fly fishing so what I was really interested in was fishing unique to Oregon which would be steelhead and salmon. What I was trying to figure out was the time of year I might be able to sample everything- if such is possible. For Example if the Salmon enter the rivers in September, then what steelheed streams would be good in September, or if the summer steelhead around steamboat is excellent, then is there any salmon fishing at the same time (even if in the ocean, off shore). I've tried reading up on all this but it is very confusing to an outsider because in the Columbia River it sounds like the fish move upstream as the season progresses and then different rivers have runs at different times.
                  What I was looking for was something like....."Go in August, you can hit the steelhead on the N. Branch on the Umpqua, on the Rogue at that time of year be upstream form Medford, then go to around XYZ on the Columbia (or whatever) for salmon. On the Steelhead, I wanted (if possible) to wade and fly fish but on the salmon, probably with a guide in a boat, and what ever tackle was doable.

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                  • #10
                    The Clackamas in May OFFers both salmon and steelhead fishing. But like most places, the timing and size of runs can be a crapshoot.

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                    • #11
                      Not to sound impolite but...

                      If it was easy to figure out--and could actually be done--everybody would be doing it.
                      Last edited by troutdude; 10-16-2017, 12:39 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DrTheopolis View Post
                        the timing and size of runs can be a crapshoot.
                        That is the kicker. There are a lot of rivers where you have salmon and steelhead at the same time.....but whether or not the runs are good enough to catch anything at the time is a different story. It seems like a lot of the time when the steelhead bite is hot then the salmon are finished, even if they are there.

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                        • #13
                          Well I have continued to do some reading, remember I have never been to Oregon. It sounds like springtime has a lot of apple blossoms, snow still on the tops of mountains, etc.- so from just a touring aspect- that might be more scenic than summer. One issue would be if spring snow melt had all the rivers in a torrent. I could then figure Fall (September?) and see the Fall leaves ( don't have that in Florida) plus early snow on the mountain tops, and maybe low water that would be easy to wade. As I understand from my readings, the Fall Salmon start end of August or September.
                          On the salmon, someone said coho/silver are earier to catch in the rivers and more acrobatic. Even if I wade, I might fly fish around steamboat for steelhead because that is an "experience" thing but use spinning in other areas, even if wading.
                          I have done some Great Lakes Tributory fishing for salmon. My experience is that Chinnok are best caught closer to the Lakes, the farther upstream they swim the less they take a lure/fly. (I've used both). I've never caught any Coho/Silver because in the Great Lakes they run upstream much faster and it is a hit or miss thing, if you are at the spot in the river when they run- fine. Otherwise you can't catch something not there.
                          Once again, thanks for any help. If any of you ever come to Florida to catch bass, ask me for help. Glad to reciprocate.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Red Owl View Post
                            I could then figure Fall (September?) and see the Fall leaves ( don't have that in Florida) plus early snow on the mountain tops, and maybe low water that would be easy to wade. As I understand from my readings, the Fall Salmon start end of August or September.
                            Yes. Fall is my favorite time, of the year. And the water is low, until the Oregon monsoons begin. Which, this year, hasn't happened yet. So the only place to find Salmon, right now, is in the bay's and tidewaters. You would need a boat, for that. However, you could do some fly fishing for Sea-Run Cutthroat Trout. They are a smaller cousin, to our infamous Steelhead.

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                            • #15
                              Here's the latest scoop! I was on my way up to help out with the Gresham fam fish event. Stopped on the Clack, It great fishing. stayed for two day in my mtrhome.metal hds, salmon, srcutts and trout. I don't know what set the fishing on fire. One hella two days C&R. Never made it to the family event. Tony

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                              • #16
                                Well, then I think I'll start considering a trip next Fall. Thanks.

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