Thoughts, suggestions, insights and advice requested.

Fummus
So, looking at ways to get my middle child and me out on the water. I have experience paddling pontoons on creeks and rivers, but don't thing pontoon is the way I want to go. Wanting something that will fit both of us (kids 6'4" and 250lbs, and I'm 6' 1" or so and well a bit heavier than him), and is man portable once we get to fishing area. As for uses, mostly ponds and lakes, with occasional trips to the coast for bay fishing for rock fish. Not as brave as Roger, so don't expect to be out in open ocean slaying halibuts and leviathans. I've been researching SOT tandem fishing kayaks and really thinking that's the way I want to go. Paddle should be fine to start as long as we don't have a double hook up, since one can paddle while the other lands fish. In the even of a double hook up...fire up the camera, should be a show. Was thinking rigid hull and either load on top of the explorer or use a trailer if needed, but have also seen some inflatables that seem as though they might be doable (shrug). Really like the idea of tandem, but maybe there are advantages to two singles that I'm not seeing yet?? Anywho, I'm going to keep on checking NorthWest Kayak anglers web sight, but wanted to ask you fine folks your thoughts as well. Heck, maybe there's some other option than kayaks that would be a better fit. Like I said, just looking for suggestions thoughts advise etc. Thanks in advance.
Oh, one last thing, budget wise, not made of money so as much as I'd like to get a pair of Hobies like Roger uses, way out of my price range at this point.
 
Snopro
Came across this today. You can probably do better. Duo SOT

Some people enjoy doubling up on a kayak, but I think most people prefer singles.
 
DOKF
My boy (6'4" 180#) and I (5'6" 170 #) do well in a 10' Aluminium canoe. Easy to get into most lakes and ponds, but not something I'd be out in the skookumchuck in.

We have navigated some choppy waters on Hagg Lake , Timothy Lake and others, but do tend to stay in smaller lakes when the wind is likely.

Prime bonding time with the wee one.
 
Fummus
Thanks for the replies. Agree a canoe would work well if lakes and ponds, but not so much for rockfish in the bays. Was looking at a lifetime kayak from tractor supply for around $800.00, but it's only a single and I don't know much about the brand or company. As for tandem, no real clue what brands or models to be looking at. Northwest Kayak Anglers page has several post mentioning the advantages of test paddling before buying, but don't know of any place in southern Oregon that offers that service. Was also wondering if anyone had experience or thoughts on rowing kits for kayaks.
 
NKlamerus
Fummus said:
Thanks for the replies. Agree a canoe would work well if lakes and ponds, but not so much for rockfish in the bays. Was looking at a lifetime kayak from tractor supply for around $800.00, but it's only a single and I don't know much about the brand or company. As for tandem, no real clue what brands or models to be looking at. Northwest Kayak Anglers page has several post mentioning the advantages of test paddling before buying, but don't know of any place in southern Oregon that offers that service. Was also wondering if anyone had experience or thoughts on rowing kits for kayaks.
800$??? Whatever you do, don't buy that. Not sure if that's tractor supply mark up or what

You could buy decent canoe for 3-400$ easily on marketplace.

How about a ganoe, or flat back canoe, options open up to a small gas or electric motor. For heavier water there are some nice pontoon kits available
 
rogerdodger
my 'big picture' advice is consistently this: if you intend to go on big lakes/tidewater/saltwater, you want a self draining boat so that you can self recover in any conditions you intend to be out in.

A canoe or SINK (Sit-IN-Kayak, non-draining) might be recoverable in fairly calm conditions but no thanks on big water.

And absolutely do some self recovery practice so that you have an approach that worked for you. Confidence that you can flip the boat and get back on while you have enough strength/energy is the key. cheers, roger
 
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