Silverton Reservoir fishing

G

Growbug

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Messages
527
Location
Dickie Prairie, Molalla
What fish are in Silverton Reservoir? Is it any good for trout this early in the year? I need to go out and test my toon.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,906
Location
Oregon City
Sorry to bring you bad news but Silverton Reservoir is locked up until sometime in April. They stock it pretty well all season with 10" to 'larger' rainbows. I have yet to encounter a 'larger' fish there so I'm not quite sure what ODF conciders one to be. :confused:
 
Last edited:
G

Growbug

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Messages
527
Location
Dickie Prairie, Molalla
The gates are open and the sign says 10am til 4pm for winter hours. It was open and there were people on the water today.
 
O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,906
Location
Oregon City
I stand corrected.:redface: Of all the times I've tried to fish there early the gate has been closed. Since it is the water suppy for the town I figured it had a limited open season starting at the time of the first trout stocking. End of April.
 
B

bigsteel

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Messages
2,546
Location
salem, oregon
thats good to knopw the gates are opem,,,i know last year they were closed all winter.,.,.....im gonna have to try it
 
1

18406ej

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 18, 2006
Messages
828
Location
Keizer, Oregon
Here is some info generously contributed by member Capblack in an earlier Silverton Reservoir thread:

I saw some people asking for info on Silverton Res on here, and since I grew up less than a mile from there and spent my entire childhood fishing that res, except for when dad took me down the santiam, I thought I would put in my 2 cent worth.
First of all if your going to fish from a boat, try to get up the creek as far as possible, and bank fish, theres some very nice cutthroats in there. also the rock wall and anywhere towards the middle above the boat ramp is good. I saw the res when they let the water out for repairs, and the channel is from the inlet right down the oppisite bank above the bend. No more than 30 ft from the edge. Then when it comes around the bend, Its about middle of the res until it gets to the spillway.
If your bank fishing, anywhere to the left of the boat ramp as far as you can go is fine, and Ive seen people on the point doing pretty good when I was in a boat. a lot of people fish between the ramp and the spillway, but Ive never had much luck there, and its always crowded after they stock it. Its also very shallow towards the fence, you can wade across in the summer time.
As far as bait is concerned, stockers are all pretty generic, eggs, worms off the bottom if you blow them up to float, powert bait, spinners. If your going up stream for cutthroats, try spinners and drifting worms or eggs.
Hope this helps some of you, this is a very good place to take the kids, with them stocking it, and the restrooms and all. happy fishing, Brian
 
O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,906
Location
Oregon City
thats good to knopw the gates are opem,,,i know last year they were closed all winter.,.,.....im gonna have to try it

That's good to know too. For a second there I thought I was loosing it.

Anyway, I have used a number of fly patterns there e.g. Carey Specials, buggers, Zug Bugs and I've done OK at best maybe 10 fish in 4 hours average. But what I noticed most was a Midge hatch. When Midge pupae swim to the surface, they need to break through the surface film at which point they are sitting ducks for trout. This hatch occures anywhere on the lake and the fish effortlessly take them with a suttle slurp. It almost looks like rain drops hitting the water. Imitating this tiny Chornomid requiers different methods in the presentation. One way is with the use of a sinking line (use sinking in deeper water or floating line with leader long enough to get to the bottom) because the pupae will swim slowly straight up from the bottom and pause frequently which means the fly is retreived vertically with numerous stops. The other way is to use a floating line and a pattern with a foam head so it floats vertically just under the surface film. The fly must remain still so anchor up good.

So why am I telling you all of this? Because last year I couldn't even Buy a fish when this hatch occurred therefore I have done some homework and this year I'll be prepared and so can you!
 
Last edited:
R

rainbowfisherman

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2008
Messages
406
Onthefly: Thank you for the information but i just have one question. I love to fly fish and would love to get into some trout up there sometime. I do have a float tube and have a question about this chornomid hatch your talking about. First of all would you just use a little sno cone fly? Or something different. Also on the presentation. Do you just sit not moving a drop down your fly line and slowly bring it up? I have floating line and was just wondering how you would do this. As i said thank you for the information you have already given.

-Rainbowfisherman
 
O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,906
Location
Oregon City
I use intermediate sinking line on lakes most of the time until I see rising fish at which time I try to find something on the surface they might be eating then change to floating. I have never tried the sink and retrieve method I described but I plan to try it out this season. If you happen to have a midge pupa or chironimid pattern that is designed to float vertically then use it with your floating line with light tippet, cast to rising fish and wait just like casting dry flies. A must have book for fly fishermen is Hatch Guide For Lakes by Jim Schollmeyer. He also has one for streams and another for the lower Deschutes. Let me know how you do.:)

 
Top Bottom