Rod/reel combination for surf perch


Fishnsleep

Active member
Have never done surf perch fishing, but I hear it is fun and productive at times.
Wondering what types of rod/reel is best for this type of fishing.

Thanks for any advice.
 

pinstriper

Active member
Medium heavy salmon spinning rod, 10-12’. You will be throwing weights of 1-4oz. is why, not because of the fish. 3000-3500 sized spinning reel.

30# braid mainline, then tie a 6’ or so of 20# mono leader on it. #2 or #4 boatkeeper hooks and an assortment of coin sinkers in the above weights.

Do a search on youtube for pk yi’s channel and all.

There are surf marketed rods out for under $75, the Rockaway is one that I have.
 

Bake

Member
Check out the Alvey rods & reels. After some practice, you will be amazed at the distances you can reach..

Alvey
 
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troutdude

Well-known member
Moderator
Think that you meant Alvey, which are made in Australia. I doubt that anyone uses them enough around here. To be able to recommend them. But maybe I'm mistaken.

Incidentally surf perch, are in the surf CLOSE to shore. Often in just a foot or two of water. So long distance casting typically doesn't work for them.

X2 on Pinstriper's suggestions.
 

Gulfstream

Active member
I use a 9-10 foot spinning rod similar to what you would use for steelhead .I only fish Carolina rigged with a #2 or 4 baitholder. About a 3 foot leader of mono and 2-3 oz egg sinker Mole crabs or Gulp worms 2.5 inch for bait. If you go keep moving until you find the fish rather than standing in one spot for the whole time you are fishing. No need to use heavy gear. Hope that helps .Best time is about 2 hrs prior to high tide,in my opnion
 

BrandonBeach

New member
All of what Gulfstream said.

That said, I would buy a cheap spin reel, sand and salt water take a toll on reels.

I like sand shrimp for bait, clam necks work at times. Gulp sand worms in the camo color have worked well at times.

Check for wave swell heights, over 6’ swell is difficult to fish and can be dangerous wading in the surf.

B carefull.good luck.
 

bass

Well-known member
Medium heavy salmon spinning rod, 10-12’. You will be throwing weights of 1-4oz. is why, not because of the fish. 3000-3500 sized spinning reel.

30# braid mainline, then tie a 6’ or so of 20# mono leader on it. #2 or #4 boatkeeper hooks and an assortment of coin sinkers in the above weights.

Do a search on youtube for pk yi’s channel and all.

There are surf marketed rods out for under $75, the Rockaway is one that I have.
I don't own an Okuma Rockaway but they look really nice! I was tempted during the sportsman's show sale at Fisherman's but I already have a 9'6" 1-3 oz rod that works well. If I was buying today I would definitely get an Okuma Rockaway - especially if you can find one on sale.
 

pinstriper

Active member
I don't own an Okuma Rockaway but they look really nice! I was tempted during the sportsman's show sale at Fisherman's but I already have a 9'6" 1-3 oz rod that works well. If I was buying today I would definitely get an Okuma Rockaway - especially if you can find one on sale.
If you have a rod that wont snap at 3 oz, just use that knowing you wont throw as far, or hold in sportier surf.

Which isnt that big a deal because they play is a slow retrieve and thus hit may only come at 30’ away, not 200!

But, depending on the beach and the tide, you may want to be able to reach a hole. I have used a shorter but still stiff spinning rod like a bass rod and confined my casts to 75’ or so with 3/4 oz. it works, provided that is where the fish are. Throwing farther lets you cover more water near and far. It isnt mandatory but ups your chances.

Honestly, I throw 2 or 3 oz mostly. If the surf calls for 4, it is pretty sporty out there and getting dicey whether to be in the surf at all.
 

pinstriper

Active member
That light tackle blog post has a lot of good in it, plus a bit of....meh.

1- His caveat about using light tackle in low surf conditions is right on. Indeed, I said as much. I fish both ways. A stiff bass spinning rod or steelhead rod is enough. His comment about coffee-grinder sized reels also. Nothing bigger than a steelhead reel is necessary, because you are running braid and it will carry way more than you can throw.

2- Carolina rig is a great way to fish, but you are only fishing one hook. No thrill of the double !

3- With a Carolina rig you are stuck using swivels. With a bottom rig, you just tie the leader to your mainline, uni-to-uni. Goes right through your guides if you tie it right and haven't gone so light on your gear that you get tiny guides. This is faster and easier for changing up the weight or re-rigging.

4- He calls for a flouro leader. Waste of money in the surf. The water is too cloudy and the fish aren't leader shy. Perch in the surf make a split second decision to attack the bait from farther away than they can see a mono leader in turbulent water.

5- Again on the rigging, you don't even need a small tackle box like he shows if you avoid the Carolina rig. A pack of hooks, a small spool of leader material, and 2 each disk sinkers in 1, 2, 3 oz. All in one pocket. Swivels are just impossible to manage loose in a pocket.

6- Tides. Meh. They bite at all tides. See his part about holes and troughs. Those will appear on each beach in different tides. Sometimes the hole you want is only visible or reachable at low tide. Or high. Or in between. Its not a matter of which tide, but which tide for which beach. And in fact, if you find a good outbound rip with a lighter weight that gets to the bottom but won't hold, you can take advantage of that to let your gear drift out to water you can't cast to, before you being your slow stop-and-go retrieve.

7- 14# braid. This is important. Do not use braid that thin. It will cut like a knife because it is so thin. 30# braid won't cut your fingers to ribbons, is easier to tie with, and casts just fine. High vis or even just white will give you a better idea where your gear is and how its moving.

One of these days I am going to play with using a slider to rig Carolina, with dipsey sinkers in 1/2-1oz sizes clipped directly to the slider. That would make it easy to adjust the weight. But you still end up only running one hook.
 

BrandonBeach

New member
For a starting place to try, go to Barview jetty on the north side of the tillimook bay entrance. Walk north a piece,up the beach, fishing as you go. There should be fishermen to talk to and watch.

Not the best place to fish, but it’s good there at times. Again, watch the swell, look for days under 5’ . I honestly catch more fish on incoming tide close to hi tide.

Good luck, be safe,

BB
 

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