Nestucca cutthroat fest and rainbows too

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bigsteel

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me and lilsalmon headed over to the nestucca to chase cutthroats and bows,,,it was an excellent day and a half,,,weather was 70 and perfect for dry fly fishing,,,her sons came up with us and the older one started fly fishing and got into his first fish,it was awesome to see his excitement,,,,the whole day and a half i caught 42 cutthroat and rainbows,,the biggest was an 18 incher hidin under the brush .peacock stimulator,,EHC,and goddard caddis were money flies..the river is real low so it gave me a chance to hike up and down the river and hit every single pocket and every seam i could find,,and it worked,they were fiesty fish..:):):) im not sure how to tell if there sea run or not?????
 
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troutramp

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I dont know either but it looks like fun.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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Sounds like you guys had a great time once again.

Sea-runs are larger...often 18 - 20 inches in most streams. And locals call 'em "bluebacks"; cuz their backs are a deep/bright blue...especially while they are still under water.

So, that one 18" was most likely a blueback. Maybe some of the others were too.
 
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Sinkline

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Great report Bigsteel aand Lilsalmon! Awesome photos of some beautiful wild trout!
 
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eggs

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Looks like you guys had a good time! I love that river! You should try camping at Rocky Bend!
 
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Mike123

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Nice guys!! :clap:
I can't wait to go target some SRC's!

When the SRC's first come in, which is around this time through September, they are brighter and more silver. I've even seen them with sea lice. It's really hard to tell the difference. a lot of your cutts you catch on coastal streams journey to the bay sometime in their life.
 
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lilsalmon

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It was a great time....have to try out Rocky Bend, eggs...maybe someone will stop by in the early morning hours...hehe. I didn't get any pics of mine but it was a great time. I had a 12 inch beautiful cutthroat and got the cell out to take a pic and boom away he goes....damn I need a good camera. It was a great time with my boys too....don't want to hijack the thread but my son Josh (28) has come to the dark side.....yessssss. Thanks Dave for showing him the ways of flyfishing......

Nice pics Bigsteel!!!! Good job!
 
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eggs

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Yea that was fun Saturday... too bad I couldnt talk that steelhead into biting!
 
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lilsalmon

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I know....I was hoping to witness that but decided to wander back a ways and got that nice cutthroat. We will have to do it again soon
 
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Oregon Knights

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Reading and viewing this thread and many others, I not only see some nice fish, but I also see what seems to be a lot of nice fish being handled unnecessarily. IMHO. Wouldn't we all be doing the fish and our passion a favor by not handling the fish unless absolutely necessary? Especially the natives. I struggle to remember the last time I needed to hold or handle a fish to remove a fly. Shoot, I release a lot from a distance longer than the rod!!! Some forceps for removing a barbless a hook works so well and the fish is off and swimming.

Dale
 
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eggs

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I don't see 1 picture of them holding the fish with any force.. they are craddled...

I can promise you man(I was there and fish with them every weekend) bigsteel and lilsalmon handle fish like they are a new born child.. hook removed lifted for less then 5 seconds and picture taken and fish softly placed in the water... barbless flies only..

5 seconds out of water, no squeezing of fish, and proper recovery in flowing water will not harm a fish..

Thanks for caring about the fish as much as we do...
 
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lilsalmon

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Reading and viewing this thread and many others, I not only see some nice fish, but I also see what seems to be a lot of nice fish being handled unnecessarily. IMHO. Wouldn't we all be doing the fish and our passion a favor by not handling the fish unless absolutely necessary? Especially the natives. I struggle to remember the last time I needed to hold or handle a fish to remove a fly. Shoot, I release a lot from a distance longer than the rod!!! Some forceps for removing a barbless a hook works so well and the fish is off and swimming.

Dale

I respect every fish that I catch and safely release them (unless they are from a lake and are hatchery and then I might take a few home). I found since I started fly fishing I don't have to use forceps. They come our easily enough. Just one question though. How do you release a fish from the distance longer than a rod? Yank it out of their mouth? Just curious.
 
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bigsteel

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Reading and viewing this thread and many others, I not only see some nice fish, but I also see what seems to be a lot of nice fish being handled unnecessarily. IMHO. Wouldn't we all be doing the fish and our passion a favor by not handling the fish unless absolutely necessary? Especially the natives. I struggle to remember the last time I needed to hold or handle a fish to remove a fly. Shoot, I release a lot from a distance longer than the rod!!! Some forceps for removing a barbless a hook works so well and the fish is off and swimming.

Dale
i know how to handle fish and i appreciate the insight but when your standing in 4 foot rushing water and the fish has swallowed the fly you have to do what u have to do.all fish were released unharmed....im all about caring for native fish but there is an overboard point of view,,,none of these fish died so i feel good about that
 
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nwkiller

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way to go big steel!!!! beautys
 
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Oregon Knights

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i know how to handle fish and i appreciate the insight but when your standing in 4 foot rushing water and the fish has swallowed the fly you have to do what u have to do.all fish were released unharmed....im all about caring for native fish but there is an overboard point of view,,,none of these fish died so i feel good about that

Apparently my post hit a nerve. I wasn't suggesting inappropriate handling of fish. However, I do see one photo of the fish lying in the dirt. What I was suggesting is, we don't need to take all our fish out of the water, cradle or otherwise and take photos. If it were a Bull Trout, you'd be in violation of Oregon fishing rules. We can actually leave them in the water to take a photo, remove the hook and cause less harm, especially when handling with dry hands. Everytime we touch a fish, we remove some of the slime on their skin, which is the protective coating to keep away disease. They likely won't die in your hands or when you finally release them. They'll develop problems in time and expire days or weeks, well after you've gone home.

In response to the question from LilSalmon, releasing a fish at a distance longer than the rod is quite easy. I'm sure you've done it yourself. Also called an early release, or long distance release. Usually refers to the one that got away!!!

As for the use of forceps, this allows for a simple and effect means for removing the hook without the need to touch the fish. Even when they swallow the hook, which in my experience is very rare when fly fishing.

Dale
 
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bigsteel

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Apparently my post hit a nerve. I wasn't suggesting inappropriate handling of fish. However, I do see one photo of the fish lying in the dirt. What I was suggesting is, we don't need to take all our fish out of the water, cradle or otherwise and take photos. If it were a Bull Trout, you'd be in violation of Oregon fishing rules. We can actually leave them in the water to take a photo, remove the hook and cause less harm, especially when handling with dry hands. Everytime we touch a fish, we remove some of the slime on their skin, which is the protective coating to keep away disease. They likely won't die in your hands or when you finally release them. They'll develop problems in time and expire days or weeks, well after you've gone home.

In response to the question from LilSalmon, releasing a fish at a distance longer than the rod is quite easy. I'm sure you've done it yourself. Also called an early release, or long distance release. Usually refers to the one that got away!!!

As for the use of forceps, this allows for a simple and effect means for removing the hook without the need to touch the fish. Even when they swallow the hook, which in my experience is very rare when fly fishing.

Dale

that fish your refering too is not in the dirt,,,ive never put a fish in the dirt,,,,as far as your handling issues with fish,,,,,dont you think the hooking fighting and landing a fish has more impact on that fish then unhooking it snapping a photo and releasing it,,WELL I DO AND FOR THE PEOPLE SUCH AS YOURSELVES THAT ARE SO WORRIED ABOUT HANDLING A FISH YOU SHOULDNT FISH IN WATERS WITH CUTTHROAT OR NATIVE FISH......ive fly fished since i was 14 and ive had plenty of fish swallow the fly.....if y9ou dont like the photos then dont look.
 
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Oregon Knights

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that fish your refering too is not in the dirt,,,ive never put a fish in the dirt,,,,as far as your handling issues with fish,,,,,dont you think the hooking fighting and landing a fish has more impact on that fish then unhooking it snapping a photo and releasing it,,WELL I DO AND FOR THE PEOPLE SUCH AS YOURSELVES THAT ARE SO WORRIED ABOUT HANDLING A FISH YOU SHOULDNT FISH IN WATERS WITH CUTTHROAT OR NATIVE FISH......ive fly fished since i was 14 and ive had plenty of fish swallow the fly.....if y9ou dont like the photos then dont look.

After much thought and consideration, I decided you are absolutely right bigsteel. I do care too much for the fish and want too much for their future. I do have grandchildren and would like for them to be able to fish for native trout in our waters. So rather than trying to change a few opinions and behaviors of people on this forum, I really need to address the issue directly with the Department of Fish & Wildlife. I've been successful in this regard in the past and should continue to work with those who can change the rules. It's people like you that help others to see the light and find ways to make things better for us all. You are an inspiration. Thank you.

Dale
 
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troutramp

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Oregon Knights:
I can almost respect what you are trying to do here as far as educating people on proper fish handling techniques, however I believe your tact is less than sharp. I dont believe people are going to respond to being attacked in a positive manner. There is some truth to your "suggestions" as far as fish handling, but also some truth in the fact that in order to handle a fish you must first drive a sharp metal hook into its mouth, and then play it until it comes to hand or net. As many or more fish die from the exaustion of the fight than from improper handling techniques used at the release. Some may say that if you have played a fish to the point that you could simply reach down with a forcep and remove the hook you may have already endangered the fish. Of course I am not accusing you of this as I have not seen you land a fish and I would not assume IE: handling fish with dry hands.... ect
 
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bigsteel

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After much thought and consideration, I decided you are absolutely right bigsteel. I do care too much for the fish and want too much for their future. I do have grandchildren and would like for them to be able to fish for native trout in our waters. So rather than trying to change a few opinions and behaviors of people on this forum, I really need to address the issue directly with the Department of Fish & Wildlife. I've been successful in this regard in the past and should continue to work with those who can change the rules. It's people like you that help others to see the light and find ways to make things better for us all. You are an inspiration. Thank you.

Dale

good luck
 
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