Has anyone here ever tried this?

C

chrishophoto

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So do tell me, is this a crazy idea? I am new to fishing, and have been trying without success to land my first steelhead from the banks of the Sandy and Clackamas rivers, but did take a few trout before the high lakes froze up from my canoe. Now with the spring season coming along, I want to kill and eat a salmon.

My question is this, has anyone ever tried to catch a salmon in a canoe? That’s what I have, I live a mile from the Willamette, and think that my rowing speed would be about the same as trolling. I also have rigged up a good way to mount my rod on the gunwales. In my mind this should work, but at the same time I can see a sort of “Nantucket sleigh ride” scenario being possible. I have never fought anything more than a 16” trout (which seemed too easy, really), but I am wondering if I hooked a good-sized Chinook if I might be in for a different sort of experience.

Anyone here ever done this?
:think:
 
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K

Kodiak

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HeHe!

HeHe!

It could be interesting to say the least! Just remember you are not going to be able to paddle when you hook up and a decent fish can take you 10 to 15 min to bring to the net, if it decides to return to the big blue they can cover a mile or more taking you with them. In the tide water I know they pull our driftboat around pretty good. I really would like to get into a double with a pair of good fish going in the same direction and see how much speed we can get up!
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

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Sounds hazardous

Sounds hazardous

So do tell me, is this a crazy idea? I am new to fishing, and have been trying without success to land my first steelhead from the banks of the Sandy and Clackamas rivers, but did take a few trout before the high lakes froze up from my canoe. Now with the spring season coming along, I want to kill and eat a salmon.

My question is this, has anyone ever tried to catch a salmon in a canoe? That’s what I have, I live a mile from the Willamette, and think that my rowing speed would be about the same as trolling. I also have rigged up a good way to mount my rod on the gunwales. In my mind this should work, but at the same time I can see a sort of “Nantucket sleigh ride” scenario being possible. I have never fought anything more than a 16” trout (which seemed too easy, really), but I am wondering if I hooked a good-sized Chinook if I might be in for a different sort of experience.

Anyone here ever done this?
:think:

Well, I would think it should be feasible with an experienced rowing partner. I sure wouldn't try it alone. That salmon on the end of your line is not going to wait patiently for your canoe to turn to follow it or give a hoot about causing chaos by going under you and changing directions. If you decide to give it a go,make sure you take all the safety precautions! A pfd won't help save your life if it is in the opposite end of the canoe. Let us know what you decide. Be safe.
Barb
 
N

ninja2010

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i've never hooked a salmon before, but i have fished from sit-on-top kayaks for saltwater pelagics like yellowtails and tuna. they run hard and it's fun, but we usually head out in pairs or in a group, never alone (more fun, and safer - just in case)

also, our setups are usually in the 15-30lb range. the biggest brute i ever landed on a kayak is a 24lb yellowtail. it's crazy the first handful of runs, even with the drag buttoned down, but after 10 minutes i win... :D

good luck out there - i say go get em! but if you can, bring a buddy. and pfd is not an option. gear up, hang tight, and have fun.
 
A

ArcticAmoeba

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In my opinion a canoe is not near stable enough to be able to manage the boat, and fight a fish at the same time. You could rig an anchor system, and hope you don't get spooled, but a 'yak, even pontoon would probably work better. Or just use the canoe for transportation from different bank spots.
 
H

halibuthitman

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?

?

I think your success rate is going to be very low. Somewhere between 0- and losing $500 worth of gear. :shock: but hey, good things happen, to those who bait! good luck!
 
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Kodiak

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That gives me an Idea!!!

That gives me an Idea!!!

Ive caught steelies from an innertube before, a lot of fun once you get them tired they become pets..like a puppy on a leash. then they get untired, get the rope wrapped around your leg and try and kill you now that they have a better grip, then your half drunk bro spots a lamprey trailing your fish and starts swatting at it with an oar, which makes the fish go nuts and the rope burns around your ankle worse, except there REALLY IS A LAMPREY!!!!!!!! :shock:so manage to scramble out of the river and your friendly neighborhood "law enforcement official" happens to be waiting for your licsene and tag, which is now drifftingly into the next whole in the ice chest which is currently unmanned and bad things are about to happen at the bottom of the hole which is the whole reason you brought innertubes in the first place!!!:wall:

I can't wait to try it with springers if we gat a season this year!!!!!:dance:
 
C

chrishophoto

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Well, I would think it should be feasible with an experienced rowing partner. I sure wouldn't try it alone. That salmon on the end of your line is not going to wait patiently for your canoe to turn to follow it or give a hoot about causing chaos by going under you and changing directions. If you decide to give it a go,make sure you take all the safety precautions! A pfd won't help save your life if it is in the opposite end of the canoe. Let us know what you decide. Be safe.
Barb

I would definitely wear a life jacket for this experiment. As for what to do when and if i got a fish on, I think that if I got into some really sticky situation, I could always cut the line as a last resort. I do think it is something I am crazy enough to try, and if I do, I'll be sure to report my results here!
 
M

Mike123

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So do tell me, is this a crazy idea? I am new to fishing, and have been trying without success to land my first steelhead from the banks of the Sandy and Clackamas rivers, but did take a few trout before the high lakes froze up from my canoe. Now with the spring season coming along, I want to kill and eat a salmon.

My question is this, has anyone ever tried to catch a salmon in a canoe? That’s what I have, I live a mile from the Willamette, and think that my rowing speed would be about the same as trolling. I also have rigged up a good way to mount my rod on the gunwales. In my mind this should work, but at the same time I can see a sort of “Nantucket sleigh ride” scenario being possible. I have never fought anything more than a 16” trout (which seemed too easy, really), but I am wondering if I hooked a good-sized Chinook if I might be in for a different sort of experience.

Anyone here ever done this?
:think:

I've seen quite a few people in canoes Salmon fishing!
Basically if you can get a rod holder on there somewhere and get your herring out, then just row at the right speed. I'd def stay away from the crowds though.. I've seen a few do this on Siletz tidewater for Fall chinook.
 
T

Taku

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So do tell me, is this a crazy idea? I am new to fishing, and have been trying without success to land my first steelhead from the banks of the Sandy and Clackamas rivers, but did take a few trout before the high lakes froze up from my canoe. Now with the spring season coming along, I want to kill and eat a salmon.

My question is this, has anyone ever tried to catch a salmon in a canoe? That’s what I have, I live a mile from the Willamette, and think that my rowing speed would be about the same as trolling. I also have rigged up a good way to mount my rod on the gunwales. In my mind this should work, but at the same time I can see a sort of “Nantucket sleigh ride” scenario being possible. I have never fought anything more than a 16” trout (which seemed too easy, really), but I am wondering if I hooked a good-sized Chinook if I might be in for a different sort of experience.

Anyone here ever done this?
:think:



The canoe is great for calm waters for trout and bass and such.
My guess is you will have some hair raising moments trying to chinook fish from a canoe. Even steelhead if you are talking the Clack or similar river. We have seen drift boats flip there when they were preoccupied and not paying attention to the currents, rapids, boulders, trees.........
I would not do it. But maybe a nice way to access some great bank spots you couldn't get to otherwise. But I like living too much :)
 
J

joemomma

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Yes, I too have seen guys land them at sellwood from kayaks.My concern would be boat wave while fighting a fish....just a thought, a second person to get ya pointed into the wave could fix this, I guess
 
T

Taku

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Yes, I too have seen guys land them at sellwood from kayaks.My concern would be boat wave while fighting a fish....just a thought, a second person to get ya pointed into the wave could fix this, I guess

I think there is one more thing beyond the intensity of fighting a springer and not paying attention to hazards is the sea lions.
We heard the 2nd report today of a sea lion nearly sinking a boat.
We fished by a guy that had a big gash and dent in his aluminum boat from a sea lion trying to come into the boat after he pulled his fish away from it in the net, the sea lion came up onto the boat after the fish. He nearly sunk the boat. Should that happen he would probably halve your canoe, Those things weigh upwards of 700 to 800 lbs and some larger. Lots of teeth when they are after a fish. Just something to think about. Wear a GOOD lifejacket.
 
B

beaverfan

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I can't imagine a canoe being stable enough to handle a 30lb salmon. A smaller one maybe but you get a fish like that going the wrong direction and oops your in the water. I'm sure occasionally you could do it succesfully but I'm sure you would have a few screw ups first. So ya, do it if you want but I wouldn't recommend it and wear a life jacket for sure. Shoot wear two.
 
C

chrishophoto

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I think there is one more thing beyond the intensity of fighting a springer and not paying attention to hazards is the sea lions.
We heard the 2nd report today of a sea lion nearly sinking a boat.
We fished by a guy that had a big gash and dent in his aluminum boat from a sea lion trying to come into the boat after he pulled his fish away from it in the net, the sea lion came up onto the boat after the fish. He nearly sunk the boat. Should that happen he would probably halve your canoe, Those things weigh upwards of 700 to 800 lbs and some larger. Lots of teeth when they are after a fish. Just something to think about. Wear a GOOD lifejacket.

Well, for what it's worth, have no intention of taking my canoe out onto the Columbia. The water is too rough there. The Willamette however is a different story, and in most situations, quite manageable.


-C
 
A

ArcticAmoeba

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If you are die hard about getting into some Salmonids out of a dugout style boat, perhaps a Kaynoe is a good route to investigate. A friend of both GreenDrifter and myself has one, and that thing gets rallied pretty hard. Slightly more stable than a canoe, but not near as bad once you are in it. And it has decent gunnels to mount things to. Because what would a boat be without being overfull of crap nobody needs!:lol:
 
C

chrishophoto

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If you are die hard about getting into some Salmonids out of a dugout style boat, perhaps a Kaynoe is a good route to investigate. A friend of both GreenDrifter and myself has one, and that thing gets rallied pretty hard. Slightly more stable than a canoe, but not near as bad once you are in it. And it has decent gunnels to mount things to. Because what would a boat be without being overfull of crap nobody needs!:lol:

Well, the whole idea is to do this with what I have. If I wanted to buy a boat, I'd buy a boat, but I have a canoe, and I might add that I am highly skilled with it, and even stand up in it on a regular basis just to stretch my legs.

I really don't have a big desire to spend thousands on a boat, just so
I might have better chance to get a $100 fish, if you know what I mean.

-c
 
H

halibuthitman

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idea

idea

I think if you are dead set on trying this I would fish the mult channel out of scappoose, there is exellent fishing only a couple hundred yards from a launch and no large frieghters or sealions and the nooks get thick in there! you could also tie to pilings and plunk, this area is by far the safest and most likely the most productive spot for your louis and clarke lund. Good luck!
 
H

Hawk

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Have You Kissed a Bass Today???
I think if i just had to use a canoe to do this i would at least rigup an out rigger to it.

Be Mighty Careful Bro...............


Watch the Weather Carefully...............it kin git UGLY Quick...........
 
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