Getting started flyfishing-it's easy and fun

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macken

New member
Joined
Jun 12, 2009
Messages
5
Location
Myrtle Point, Or
I thought I would try and make a sport that seems quite complicated to new people easier to understand and be productive in the shortest amount of time. I have been fly fishing for about 40yrs now and am in no way a - what is it called- purist. Fly fishing is a tool to be used as a means to an end; enjoyment, catching fish where it is the only method allowed or as in the case with most people who fly fish, the satisfaction of making something work that is not always the easiest way.

I don't fish for salmon and steelhead any more; must be an age thing, but on the north coast started that when people thought I was crazy. I was making my own fly lines and doing things by the seat of my pants. That I am aware of no one was catching chums and spring chinook on the fly before me in my area. I'm much smarter now and have learned not to force something that has little chance of working. The first little tip is to learn to pick and choose your battles. A fly rod is not a drift rod and no matter what you do, there a runs you can not fish and be successful. So following are just a few simple thoughts that will help give beginners a place to start on this wonderful way to fish.

Rods: There are 3 main actions to rods. Moderate, moderate fast, and fast. Someone learning to flyfish is better served with a moderate action rod vs a fast action rod. The basic differences are a moderate rod throws a more open loop and at a lower line speed. The fast action rod throws a tight loop at higher line speed. For the beginner fast and tight is bad. It is much easier to cast a moderate action rod and learn how to contol the cast.

The moderate action rod also serves the purpose of being able to better protect light tippets when hooking big fish. On quite a few of our lakes here in oregon it is not uncommon to be using a 1.5 to 2lb tippets and hooking fish in the 4-7lb range. So with this in mind, a 6wt moderate action rod will cover most situations. (Winter steelhead, because of the bigger rivers and constant wind, an 8wt fast action rod will serve better. Need that line speed for distance and to be able to handle more wind. An 8.5 foot rod will serve most needs.

Reel: This just holds the line. If a lower priced reel is used and it has a drag, just set the drag tight enough to keep the spool from over running and use your palm for the drag. Most fishing I prefer a non drag reel. The clicker keeps the reel spool from over running and again use your palm to control drag. expiencive reels have a drag that can be used and able to protect a light tippets. If you are fishing heavier tippets, a any drag reel will work fine. Always put dacron backing on your reels. This not only gives your more line but it also puts your fly line at the top level of the reel.

Line: Match line and rod, ie a 6wt rod uses 6wt line. It is not a good idea to to up one line size on a moderate action rod. A fast action graphite rod can easily handle to next size line.
Most fishing can be done with a WF line. DT line, double taper, is used when very suttle short casts are needed such as sight fishing in very clear shallow water. WF line gives better contol in wind an being able to cast heavy flies.

Keep in mind that the wt of the rod does not mean that it is restricted to a certain size fish. A 4wt rod will land just as big a fish as an 8wt rod. Wind and water conditions detirmine what wt rod is best suited.

Good fishing outfits can be had without breaking the bank. My two favorite float tube rods cost about 100 dollars for both. One is an old Wallace thin wall glass rod of 8 ft I use for fishing Chironimids and the other is a im6 moderate graphite rod of 8.5ft that will protect any tippet i use. Both are 5-6wt rods. I use 8wt for bass do to throwing big heavy hair bugs. A 5-6wt rod will work for bass, just use smaller flies and bugs.

Before you head out to fish, tie a 3ft piece of 25lb mono to the end of your fly line. You can get 1-2 seasons with this before having to replace. The reason is you do not want to cut your fly line when changing leaders. Use fly tying thread to cover the knot and then add epoxy for a smooth knot that will slide through the rod guides. Buy tappered leaders, much easier than tying your own, and always tie on a tippet section to the end. By changing the tippet material your tappered leaders will last for quite some time.

If there are any questions please ask or if someone wants info on fishing our lakes and what to use please let me know.
Don't ask me how to catch halibut in Alaska on a fly rod because I failed when I tried. Have fun out there and be safe.
 
M

metalmania

I've never in my life casted a fly rod, but I have always wanted to try it for silvers in Eagle Creek. Looks like maybe this will be the year I finally give it a shot:D. Thanks for posting all this info:clap:.
 
O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,892
Location
Oregon City
Macken....You are a gentleman, a scholar, and a judge of fine whisky and there are very few of us left in this world!:clap:

To me fly fishing is like a religion; you want everybody to believe in it. Of course that's not going to happen because a lot of people prefer other methods of fishing. I think to a life long bait and hardware caster fly fishing might seem too complicated and hard to learn. What most don't know is that it only takes a short period of time to understand the dynamics of fly casting. Once that is accomplished it opens the door to a whole new way of understanding the eating habits of fish. You get to a point where you can usually figure out what the fish are clewing in on. I could go on about the life cycles of a mayfly but that's all part of the learning process. I tie my own flys and there is no better fishing satisfaction then to land a matched dry 6 inches from a natural and the fish takes your fly! You cannot experience this with any other method of fishing. So..take Macken's advice and get set up. Try it..you may never look back!
 
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M

macken

New member
Joined
Jun 12, 2009
Messages
5
Location
Myrtle Point, Or
Thanks for the reply and the encouragement to others. I am not just a fly fisherman. I am an avid bass fisherman, with both hardware and fly. Using a fly rod just opens up fishing opportunities that might otherwise not be enjoyed. Like Davis lake rainbows at the height of the damsel hatch, or even an atlantic salmon out of Hosmer lake, or nice fat football bows out of chickohomeny res. I could go on but these fish are avaliable to all with modest fly gear, a little knowledge and maybe a float tube or pontoon boat. And any person who likes to fish should spend a weekend at manns lake, with fly or spinning gear it's a hoot.

I tie flies just so I can change patterns to better fit my needs and the type of water I'm fishing.

There is fish and water out there that a lot of fisherman believe they can not fish or the the point that others will have you believe you are not supposed to fish because the average angler does not possess the right gear or skills and this is simply not true. Someone can learn to fly cast but if they are not a fisherman or women, it will not help them catch fish. I can give a fisherman a fly rod and even if they are horrible at casting they will catch fish because it is what they do. A fly rod is just a tool to be used and enjoyed. Good fishing all.
 
S

SNDSLGR

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2009
Messages
236
Location
Pacific NW
Refreshing attitude you have about our sport. I have not tossed a fly since I was a kid and really wouldnt know how to do it properly. A lot of fly guys have a pi** poor attitude towards others that dont fish as they do. You just sound like a guy that loves something and wants to share it, without a bias. Good on you pal and thanks for a great informative post.

BTW, I grew up in Roseburg and man do I miss my beloved south and north Umpqua.
 
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redhawk50

Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
137
Location
Canby
Yah, fishing is fishing. Do I only use a fly rod, yes. But to each their own. Very good intro to fly fishing for those who have never tried. I think it is hard to go back once you have fly fished. But I agree you still have to find the fish and now where they are hanging out to catch them no matter what hardware you use. As long as it isn't dynamite it is fishing. I just like being in the water stalking fish with a fly I tied myself trying to fool the fish into biting.
 
H

halibuthitman

1
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
3,042
Location
on the edge
an old eagleclaw feaather weight yellow flyrod, a spool of brown bumpy level line a 2 lb tippet and a size 22 black ant..... and Ive never looked back, my gear has changed.... but the passion is the same. I don't know if I would call flyfishing a religion, trout streams flies and mothernature can all be touched and are real.... but I guess its the best description, but I liken it more to marriage, no one in their right mind does it..... but nothing has such a good feeling and reward when things are done right and things go your way. Amen
 
S

SalmonStalker

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2009
Messages
22
Location
Under a Rock...
I got myself a new okuma fly rod. First day i caught a 14in trought with a wooly bugger.
 
Irishrover

Irishrover

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Apr 30, 2008
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2,093
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Ocean
Welcome Macken. Nice to have another multi style fisherman on board. Hope you enjoy the site.
 
M

mahmichael

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2009
Messages
136
Location
Corvallis
A new Fly Fisher! Corvallis

A new Fly Fisher! Corvallis

Hi guys,

I am new in fly fishing (I just did some spinning!) and i want to buy everything for flyfishing.
Well as a starter I want to buy the cheap ones and try it. I asked someone and he told me that without the flies, it will cost me at least 200$ to start. I mean the Rod, reel, Backing, line, leader and rod case.

Since I have to pay for the license and some fishing classes, that will be more than 300$.

Thats too much for me!
Do you have any suggestions or any place that I can buy cheap or second handed equipments?

Any suggestion would be a great help.

Thanks
 
O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,892
Location
Oregon City
Hi guys,

I am new in fly fishing (I just did some spinning!) and i want to buy everything for flyfishing.
Well as a starter I want to buy the cheap ones and try it. I asked someone and he told me that without the flies, it will cost me at least 200$ to start. I mean the Rod, reel, Backing, line, leader and rod case.

Since I have to pay for the license and some fishing classes, that will be more than 300$.

Thats too much for me!
Do you have any suggestions or any place that I can buy cheap or second handed equipments?

Any suggestion would be a great help.

Thanks
Some sporting shops carry fly rod combos that include the equipment listed in the link. It's enough to get you started but that's about it. If you like fly fishing well enough to continue with it you won't have trouble spending the bucks later on.:)

PFLUEGER MEDALIST FLY KIT 3PC 9FT COMBO
 
T

Troutier Bassier

Active member
Joined
Mar 27, 2009
Messages
2,330
Location
Troutdale, Oregon
I've never in my life casted a fly rod, but I have always wanted to try it for silvers in Eagle Creek. Looks like maybe this will be the year I finally give it a shot:D. Thanks for posting all this info:clap:.
THAT! Is where it started....
 
M

mahmichael

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2009
Messages
136
Location
Corvallis
Some sporting shops carry fly rod combos that include the equipment listed in the link. It's enough to get you started but that's about it. If you like fly fishing well enough to continue with it you won't have trouble spending the bucks later on.:)

PFLUEGER MEDALIST FLY KIT 3PC 9FT COMBO

Thanks OnTheFly!

Are these cheap ones good enough for catching 2lb fishes?! :cool:
Is there any limitation for them?

Thanks
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

Moderator
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Messages
4,704
Location
Less than 50 feet from the Santiam River! :)
So many places to check

So many places to check

Hi guys,

I am new in fly fishing (I just did some spinning!) and i want to buy everything for flyfishing.
Well as a starter I want to buy the cheap ones and try it. I asked someone and he told me that without the flies, it will cost me at least 200$ to start. I mean the Rod, reel, Backing, line, leader and rod case.

Since I have to pay for the license and some fishing classes, that will be more than 300$.

Thats too much for me!
Do you have any suggestions or any place that I can buy cheap or second handed equipments?

Any suggestion would be a great help.

Thanks

Be sure to check out the pawn shops in your area as well as the obvious Craigslist and e-bay. I also find gear in the local thrift stores. This is a good time of the year for it as folks donate more at the end of the year for tax purposes. Then there is yard sale season right around the corner to consider. Also,this is a great time to check the big sports stores online for closeouts.
 
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O

OnTheFly

Well-known member
Joined
May 3, 2009
Messages
2,892
Location
Oregon City
Thanks OnTheFly!

Are these cheap ones good enough for catching 2lb fishes?! :cool:
Is there any limitation for them?

Thanks

Absolutely. The most common fly rod is a 5wt. and will handle stockers to the larger trophies. Osmosis sometimes uses a 5wt for coho in Eagle Creek just for fun.
 
M

mahmichael

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2009
Messages
136
Location
Corvallis
New Fly Fisher!!!

New Fly Fisher!!!

Thank you all for helping.

I got my answer! :dance:
i need to get a license for fishing. Since I moved to Oregon (Corvallis) less than two months age, i can't apply for a resident License (I guess there should be at least 6 months of residency in Oregon). And the other thing is that I'm an F-1 student (I'm a foreigner!)!!! Can I apply for resident license after 6 months?!

Is there any cheaper way to go fishing?!
(The license price for a non-resident is 106$ :shock: :( :confused:)

Thanks again!

Mike
 
A

alm21

Active member
Joined
Aug 31, 2009
Messages
637
Location
Happy Valley, Oregon
Line Question for a newbie

Line Question for a newbie

I have a question but first a little background:

I'm ready... Ready to get back to fly fishing. Being new to steelhead fishing, I've realized that I have a strong desire to fish for them with a fly. I say "get back to fly fishing" because the last time I really did it was when I was 10, 27yrs ago. And that is how old my rod and reel are. Why/how I've kept it all these years, I don't know.

My dad didn't fish but I was born a fisherman. Even at that age, I wanted to fly fish. My dad bought me a Shakespeare fly combo. It's a Alpha graphite composite 8ft, 7-8 Action with a Sportfisher 44 reel. I was "self taught" and remember killing trout with this set up. In retrospect, I can't believe how successful I was and don't know why I stopped. I regret not sticking with it as this rod has literally collected dust over the years and still has the same line on it that I caught the trout with when I was 10.

I have been telling myself that I have to spend a bunch a money to get back into it. I would look at my rod and reel and think it's not worthy to fish with today. But now my desire to fly fish is greater than my budget constraints and I see my combo in a new light. The action seems reasonable for a steelhead. The reel - well not so sure but what the heck! My point being, I have a rod and reel, so why not use it until I can upgrade. I might surprise myself.

So, my question. Does anyone have line suggestions for steelhead in small streams? Sounds like I need backing, line, tippets and leader. I am going to try to get the line on today to hit some coastal rivers on Sunday. I won't have time to hit any specialty fly shops today but can get to Wholesale Outfitters or American Tackle in Clackamas.

Cheers
 
H

halibuthitman

1
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
3,042
Location
on the edge
if you're gonna fish small/very small water don't spend a lot on a line... its gonna get trashed, drug over and under bolders and snags the ground... you wont need to cast far and for steel it doesn't need to float so I would buy a $30 or less line and throw it away when it gets scratched up and nicked. When you hook your first 10 pounder and he heads off through 6 inches of water strait for a log jam you will be glad you did;)
 

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