Getting into fly fishing

Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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Hi, new to this community but not to Oregon. A buddy and I have been recently getting into fly fishing, and have been out Salmon Creek, Salt Creek, and above Hills Creek Dam around Oakridge. So far we haven't had much success. We're hoping some are willing to offer some advice on best places to go (anywhere from Roseburg to Eugene and as far east as Bend.. Not picky on if it's small lakes, creeks or rivers. We'd just like a good place to get into the groove and maybe land a few fish while we're at it. Would be appreciative of any advice, thanks!
 
jamisonace

jamisonace

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You're in the right area. Change your tactics not your location. As the day warms, small dry flies can work great but nyphming globugs, hares ears and pheasant tails is always good. Don't be afraid to go bigger too. Those fish see a lot of stone flies.
 
troutdude

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Welcome to OFF. Glad to have ya.

Be sure, though, to check the ODFW regulations. Most streams are closed to trout fishing, until late May. But most lakes are open year round. Good luck and tight lines, TD.
 
jamisonace

jamisonace

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Welcome to OFF. Glad to have ya.

Be sure, though, to check the ODFW regulations. Most streams are closed to trout fishing, until late May. But most lakes are open year round. Good luck and tight lines, TD.
TD is right. I had a fantastic day above Hills Creek one day. Was bragging about it to a friend and he let me know it was closed.
 
Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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Thanks, this is exactly the kind of info I'm looking for - much appreciated!
 
Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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I'll be sure to check the regs, thanks for the tip, not looking to lose my gear or pay any fines LOL. Also - want to be respectful of the area. Thanks everyone!
 
G

gfisher2003

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You're in the right area. Change your tactics not your location. As the day warms, small dry flies can work great but nyphming globugs, hares ears and pheasant tails is always good. Don't be afraid to go bigger too. Those fish see a lot of stone flies.
Yeah, would definitely support getting some nymphs if you don't have any. Nymph fishing isn't the most romanticized part of fly fishing but is very very effective. My go-to is generally prince nymphs, and if you get jigged flys you are less likely to snag on the bottom.
 
Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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I've picked up a variety of flies already, another reason I got to get out there and make it worth it! Thanks for the advice gfisher
 
Irishrover

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On a road trip right now. One thing I brought along was the fly gear. Headed to Az and I know there must be some fish in the lower Colorado River. Great thing about fly fishing is the gear sure doesn't take up much space.

Next thing you know you will be tying your own flies, it's fun, easy and rewarding when you hook a fish with one of your own flies.

If you ever get the chance pick up a copy of "The Curtis Creek Manifesto" by Sheridan Anderson. It a quick read and will shorten the learing curve by miles. Some day when you have the time hit the Crooked River off hwy 27 in the area of mile post 17 to 18. Great place to pound the water with a fly.
 
E

EBT

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KFreese, when folks talk about nymph fishing or stonefly fishing, an important factor is having the nymph/stonefly look natural as it drifts. If you're not familiar with fishing with a strike indicator (fancy word for bobber), do some research and use it become more productive sooner. Bottom line the bobber just allows for a better drift for your weighted fly. And, if you peg the bobber at the right length from the fly, it'll keep you from losing flies on the bottom.

Pretty soon, small/tiny dries will work too, usually in the PM when the water warms just a bit. And I second Irishrover's comments about the CCM; it's not technical, but you'll learn a lot.
 
troutdude

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Great place to pound the water with a fly.
Me thinks that there is a conundrum in there somewhere Lonn. LOL

Also...about 21 years ago I met a guy in Prescott AZ, as I was being interviewed for a job there. He told me that he makes regular trips to the grand canyon. Then he goes down and fishes the tribs that flow into the Colorado. He said that very few people do it--and there's both quantity and quality!

Good luck, TD
 
Irishrover

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TD you are right, not good to pound the water with a fly. More finesse would more likely produce a good hook up. ;)
 
troutdude

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@Kfreese91 in lakes, ponds, reservoirs...Olive Green or Black Woolly Buggers are da bombdiggity! Also Teeny Nymphs in the same colors are also deadly when out for Trout. Just barely "sub surface" is the ticket. When I was doing using those I was in my float tube, with a strike indicator, and the flies maybe 2' under the surface. Now for the SECRET...I only did one or two kicks, then drifted a few feet. Then repeated that process. You must remember that flies move EXTREMELY SLOWLY in the water. Even rowing in a boat, or on a Pontoon, is too fast IMO. And I had many days of more than 60 fish, all catch n' release of course.

Tight lines, TD
 
DOKF

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Forgot to add; black woolly buggers and egg sucking leaches were the go to flies in the tail waters below the Glen Canyon dam.

Tended to swing drift or long drift steelhead style for the trout.

Lots of sight fishing.
 
Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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On a road trip right now. One thing I brought along was the fly gear. Headed to Az and I know there must be some fish in the lower Colorado River. Great thing about fly fishing is the gear sure doesn't take up much space.

Next thing you know you will be tying your own flies, it's fun, easy and rewarding when you hook a fish with one of your own flies.

If you ever get the chance pick up a copy of "The Curtis Creek Manifesto" by Sheridan Anderson. It a quick read and will shorten the learing curve by miles. Some day when you have the time hit the Crooked River off hwy 27 in the area of mile post 17 to 18. Great place to pound the water with a fly.
Thanks for the thoughts, I'll make note to head out there some time, I love the Bend/Deschutes area. And I'll grab that book - be safe and good luck on your trip!
 
Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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Joined
Mar 10, 2021
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KFreese, when folks talk about nymph fishing or stonefly fishing, an important factor is having the nymph/stonefly look natural as it drifts. If you're not familiar with fishing with a strike indicator (fancy word for bobber), do some research and use it become more productive sooner. Bottom line the bobber just allows for a better drift for your weighted fly. And, if you peg the bobber at the right length from the fly, it'll keep you from losing flies on the bottom.

Pretty soon, small/tiny dries will work too, usually in the PM when the water warms just a bit. And I second Irishrover's comments about the CCM; it's not technical, but you'll learn a lot.
Cool, sounds good - I've been watching a lot of Orvis/Tom R vids.. I have some trouble with the indicators, getting the line to cast smoothly. Going to keep practicing. thanks for the help!
 
Kfreese91

Kfreese91

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Mar 10, 2021
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@Kfreese91 in lakes, ponds, reservoirs...Olive Green or Black Woolly Buggers are da bombdiggity! Also Teeny Nymphs in the same colors are also deadly when out for Trout. Just barely "sub surface" is the ticket. When I was doing using those I was in my float tube, with a strike indicator, and the flies maybe 2' under the surface. Now for the SECRET...I only did one or two kicks, then drifted a few feet. Then repeated that process. You must remember that flies move EXTREMELY SLOWLY in the water. Even rowing in a boat, or on a Pontoon, is too fast IMO. And I had many days of more than 60 fish, all catch n' release of course.

Tight lines, TD
Thanks for the time and replies man, I appreciate it! That's solid, by sub surface, you're talking about 2', not inches, correct? I just bought a kayak, any thoughts on the best places to use that? Been thinking about Lemolo Forebay 2..
 

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