Eating carp

surfpercher

New member
Hi everyone. I am new to carp fishing. I caught a few a couple of weeks ago and tried them. Watched a video on how to fillet them. They were not bad. But i am interested if anyone would please tell me ways of fixing them, cooking, smoking, frying? Thanks.
 

DrTheopolis

Well-known member
First, get yourself a cedar plank.

Fillet the carp, put it on the cedar plank, and put it on the grill for about 30 minutes.

Then, feed the carp to the cat and eat the plank.
 

eugene1

Moderator
I was force-fed them as a kid briefly.

Dad ran the fillets through a meat grinder and made "boneless fish balls". Deep fried them with batter.

Not a hit.

They are better used to fertilize tomatoes.
 
Eastern Europeans would definitely know ways to cook them. My mother used to cook them for me and they were not bad at all, but I really don't remember how exactly. I know she used to fry them though. She would always want the average sized ones, so they don't get too fat. As others have said, make sure they are caught in clean waters.
 
First off, eating carp is gross. That being said there are those who are brave enough to try it. In fact there is a guy on this forum who goes by fortuneplanet who eats them. The last time I went out shooting carp he took 4 off my hands and cooked them up. Here is a picture of what it looked like. He said it was a curry dish but I didn't ask for all the details. If anyone is interested I'm sure he might share the recipe.
 
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TTFishon

Well-known member
Interesting Facts: Bottom feeders, sturgeon eat a variety of organisms. Using their barbels to locate food and their extendable mouths to then vacuum it up, they eat sludge worms, aquatic insect larvae, plants, snails, shrimp, and crayfish. Sturgeon are among the oldest living species of fish.

Besides fish eggs, carp eat algae, other water plants, insects, earthworms, aquatic worms, snails, mussels, crayfish, and rotifers. They also eat old dead plant parts from the bottom. Common Carp swim along the bottom, sucking up mud and food items.

Not much difference here to me yet people rave over consuming sturgeon. lol

I'd try carp if it came out of clean water.
 

montym

Active member
I am from a land locked part of India, and we primarily eat warm water fish like carp. Carp is a fair way down the order when we consider the tastiest fish back home, but for folks like us and may be some from other countries too, carp is preferable to trout or salmon. Simple, we are used to the taste and know how to cook. If you try to cook carp like you cook salmon, or try to cook salmon the way we cook carp; you'd be better off eating that cedar plank I keep hearing about.

Looking at Mike's pic, I think fortuneplanet would probably turn out to be a neighbor of mine, that looks real good to me.

Our first step, after cleaning and washing, is to marinate the fish slices in salt and turmeric powder for at least an hour or so. Then we deep fry it, usually in mustard oil. We fry till cooked and red if we want to eat it fried, or do not cook it fully if we want to put it in a curry. I can share more details over pm if someone is interested.

Just FYI, never been able to catch a carp here yet, but I do buy carps from some Asian stores around here to eat. Imagine paying money to buy carp :)

Cheers
M

PS: I came across some US government site, can't remember the link now, that said more people eat carp than trout or salmon. Food for thought?
 
Interesting Facts: Bottom feeders, sturgeon eat a variety of organisms. Using their barbels to locate food and their extendable mouths to then vacuum it up, they eat sludge worms, aquatic insect larvae, plants, snails, shrimp, and crayfish. Sturgeon are among the oldest living species of fish.

Besides fish eggs, carp eat algae, other water plants, insects, earthworms, aquatic worms, snails, mussels, crayfish, and rotifers. They also eat old dead plant parts from the bottom. Common Carp swim along the bottom, sucking up mud and food items.

Not much difference here to me yet people rave over consuming sturgeon. lol

I'd try carp if it came out of clean water.
To me it's less about what they eat and more about what kind of conditions these nasty fish can thrive in. Carp can live in toxic water riddled with heavy metals, PCBs, etc. I don't see many sturgeon hanging out in the Columbia slough and making it out alive. There is a reason you see those signs posted at boat launches saying "DO NOT EAT (insert picture of carp)". I'm not a biologist so I don't know how far (if at all) carp migrate between clean and dirty bodies of water, but I steer clear all together.

I am from a land locked part of India, and we primarily eat warm water fish like carp. Carp is a fair way down the order when we consider the tastiest fish back home, but for folks like us and may be some from other countries too, carp is preferable to trout or salmon. Simple, we are used to the taste and know how to cook. If you try to cook carp like you cook salmon, or try to cook salmon the way we cook carp; you'd be better off eating that cedar plank I keep hearing about.

Looking at Mike's pic, I think fortuneplanet would probably turn out to be a neighbor of mine, that looks real good to me.

Our first step, after cleaning and washing, is to marinate the fish slices in salt and turmeric powder for at least an hour or so. Then we deep fry it, usually in mustard oil. We fry till cooked and red if we want to eat it fried, or do not cook it fully if we want to put it in a curry. I can share more details over pm if someone is interested.

Just FYI, never been able to catch a carp here yet, but I do buy carps from some Asian stores around here to eat. Imagine paying money to buy carp :)

Cheers
M

PS: I came across some US government site, can't remember the link now, that said more people eat carp than trout or salmon. Food for thought?
fortuneplanet is your neighbor in more than one respect. He lives in the Beaverton area and is from Bangladesh. I'm curious about the Asian store you mentioned that sells carp. Think they'd want any locally caught stuff lmao. They might be missing an eyeball or two but none of the meat would be bad :D. You might be right about that statistic of more people around the world who eat carp than trout/salmon. But I'm willing to bet most people around the world drink more dirty water than clean water. Doesn't mean it's good for you haha.
 

montym

Active member
My apologies to fortuneplanet, we did exchange a few messages some time ago about going carp fishing together, but my fishing is now mostly limited to Hagg lake a couple of times a month. Honest, catching a carp proved to be a pain and I find the little panfish a little better to eat.

Mike, I agree about the water, all the fish we eat back home are from farms in nearby rural areas where there are no major pollutants. At least that is what we believe. I won't dream about catching a carp caught in the Columbia slough. However, the quality control in India is so bad that I will be surprised if some of the fish in the markets didn't come from worse waters. To avoid getting bad fish, we go to only a few fish mongers who we trust to provide good and fresh locally caught fish.

As far as the Asian stores go, pretty much all the big ones seem to have carp. H-mart and Asian Food Center are two examples that come to mind. You might have hit upon a good business idea :)

My earlier offer made in this forum stands, if you can get a carp from a clean source I'd cook it for you and provide the beer too :). Then again, some of you may prefer that proverbial cedar plank to go with a few pints. Such is life.

Cheers
M
 
You're probably right if the fish is caught off the Columbia. The 4 carp that fortuneplanet took off me were from the main river. He actually called me a couple days ago to see if I was planning on making another trip haha. I think Friday I'll be out destroying carp again.
 
That's the Columbia. John doesn't fish the slough typically. I did research a couple years ago on Johnson Lake Property and made a post about it here on the OFF. That water has so many PCBs and heavy metals that even the carp were developing open sores. I know because I shot one there and read other accounts of people finding the same things. Believe me no sturgeon were swimming in that water or any other fish for that mater. Like I said before, carp are resilient little bastards.
 
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