Another salt water question

Fumus

New member
Never really used braid, but planning to start. Thinking 40 or 50lbs power pro to swivel to four or five feet of 20lbs fluorocarbon leader. Does this sound reasonable for jetty, bluff and surf fishing to you all??
 

rogerdodger

Moderator
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I fish reefs and rocky ocean bottom structure from a kayak and my advice would be forget the flouro. If I'm looking for big lingcod, it's with 50# braid to about 3 feet of 20# tough mono (Ultragreen or CXX-xtra strong) to a Lancer jig. When using bait (squid or herring), a 25# or 30# mooching rig to a short piece of 20# mono (that I can break off if needed) to the 50# braid. cheers, roger
 
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Fumus

New member
Thank you for the fast response gentlemen.
So, the "lower visibility/lower stretch" of fluoro not worth the extra $$? Cool! Being, I think the PC term is "financially challenged" , (married with three teens in the house), saving a dollar or two when I can is a very good thing. Reading the 2020 Oregon regs, it looks to me like there is no size limit for most of the rock fish I'm likely to catch off jetties, etc. except for 22" min for lings and 16" for Cabezons. Bag limits look to be 7 rockfish (only one of which can be a Cabezon), and two lings. Next Im wondering what the average size of black rockfish is in the Reedsport, Coosebay, etc. area.
 
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rogerdodger

Moderator
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going in reverse order:

in CoosBay (I usually fish the submerged jetty across from Charleston) I'm looking for 1.5# to 2# rockfish and any ling over 22", I'm guessing they will be about the same from the jetty areas. in the ocean, any rockfish under 2# goes back.

this is going to give you the latest regs/updates for bottomfishing: https://myodfw.com/sport-bottomfish-seasons

big issue with most flouro is a lack of toughness; it can be very sensitive to minor nicks. the low-visibility is great for low water summer steelhead but not necessary for salmon or ocean fishing. cheers, roger
 
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freednog

New member
One somewhat unintentional advantage(?) of mono is that it will actually break down more quickly than flouro. So from an environmental standpoint, mono is mildly better. So keep in mind that won't last as long as flouro, but if you're just using it as a top-shot, you'll be replacing it with some frequency anyway.

FWIW - I love the albright knot for braid to mono/flouro.
 
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nikita_pdx

Member
Flouro is quite a bit more abrasion resistant-something that is very important when fishing rocks-and doesn't stretch as much. For Jetties, use 40-50lb and surf 20-25lb. Mono stretches more, causing discoloration and kinks, and is less abrasion resistant.

The brand of line you use will also have an impact on performance. For mono, Maxima clear or ultragreen are good choices. For Flouro, Seaguar AbrazX or Red Label have excellent abrasion resistance. I can use a piece of material a full days of fishing jetties, and/or surf no problem.

In my experience, mono isn't my top choice for the ocean, but others have other opinions.
 
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