A beginner's Questions

T

Tai

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2010
Messages
23
Hey Ladies and Gents!

I've been wondering, since this is my first year fishing for steel and salmon, I want to know when should someone toss a bobber-jig V.S. a corky-and-yarn. I've been throwing a lot of corky and yarn in the riffles and rapids, and have probably tried the bobber once or twice in the calmer waters. Yet, Im very confused on when to use the bobber, because I have seen people throw it into areas I thought would be corky and yarn only. Also, I keep hearing about moving to large bait and line when the seasons get colder. How valid is this? I see that there are sandshrimp to buy at the bait shop, and I would really like to try one of these out sometime. When can I try using these?

THANKS!
 
G

Green_Tackle

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Jan 31, 2009
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Location
Portland, OR
Well, you can probably get away with using any number of methods for a certain type of water, but, some are better suited to certain types of water. There is also a huge overlap between the type of water and the method that is "best" for that type. Personally, I stick to spinners and jigs under a float. I don't much like drifting corkies, but I always have a few tied up with me just in case. Between the jigs and spinners, I can cover quite a bit of water (I'm a bank guy... no boat). You can certainly fish jigs in very shallow water and riffles but you have to change your technique a bit. You can sort of manipulate if/how the line is coming off the spool as you pull the float back and let the jig work almost like drift fishing. Deeper water is fantastic with jigs--even slow pools where drifting corkies or effectively fishing spinners would be virtually impossible. Sometimes you have to find water that works for your setup.

Here's what I do:

If the water is right to effectively fish a spinner on the bottom then I use spinners. Can't beat that simplicity. If the water is deep or narrow and I can't get a spinner down to the bottom of where I expect fish to be holding then I use a jig or pink worm under a float.

For me, when I was learning, I found it best to pick a method and then find the right water for that method. Get a book on the method you're starting with (people here on OFF can help with that). Once you get into some fish you'll begin to understand a bit about presentation size, color, reading water, etc. Then you can add gear for another method and learn that. The concepts of water temperature, level, and clarity will remain very similar across the different methods. When the corkie folks are using larger/brighter corkies, the jig folks are probably using larger/brigher jigs and the spinner guys are likely using brighter/larger spinners.
 
T

Tai

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Joined
Aug 1, 2010
Messages
23
Thanks Micah, this information is very helpful. Can I ask, because I have seen this very often of experinced steel and salmon anglers, Why do people move away from using Corky and yarn, and use mostly floats and spinners?
 
G

Green_Tackle

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Jan 31, 2009
Messages
118
Location
Portland, OR
Why do people move away from using Corky and yarn, and use mostly floats and spinners?

I'm not sure... or even sure if that's true. I think a lot of it has to do with what "the other guys" are using in the area. The trends seem to be a bit regional. Some guys can absolutely kill it drift fishing.

For me, it's simplicity. I love spinners because they're cheap and fun to make, easy to rig up, and are quite successful with trout, salmon, and steelhead. The tackle you need to fish spinners is quite minimal which comes in handy if your bushwhacking/hiking/wading. I like the jigs because sometimes the water just won't work with a spinner and I fish some of the slow, deep pools in the Wilson River quite often. They'd be hard to drift fish but floating a jig, worm, or eggs works great in those areas.

I really can't say I have anything against yarn and corkies other than after trying all 3 methods (for bank fishing/wading smaller rivers), jigs and spinners were able to cover all the water I encounter and I enjoy fishing these methods.
 
kirkster

kirkster

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Aug 13, 2009
Messages
385
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I have no idea. And it's gettin dark fast.
I have most success drifting corkie/yarn. Not because I think its the best. But its all about confidence if you feel 100% confident with the method your using I believe that's half the battle. One thing I would suggest to any beginner is to hire a guide that is willing to teach you the methods. And there are guides available that will spend the time to teach you rather than some that just get you into fish. Some people say "no way I'm paying 150 bucks for a guide". And it does sound like a lot of cash. But trust me when I say you can spend thousands of dollars over several years trying to learn what a good quality guide can teach you in 8 hours for 150 bucks. Because when the old saying says that practice makes perfect. But in all reality its perfect practice that makes perfect. I have fished salmon and steel for around 30 years and the first 10 years I was trying to learn on my own. And I finally fork out the money for a guide and I learned more in one day than I had trying to figure it out on my own. But what ever way you decide to go I wish you the best of luck
 
W

wozniasm

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Messages
745
Location
Formerly Wilsonville now St. Louis
Well, you can probably get away with using any number of methods for a certain type of water, but, some are better suited to certain types of water. There is also a huge overlap between the type of water and the method that is "best" for that type. Personally, I stick to spinners and jigs under a float. I don't much like drifting corkies, but I always have a few tied up with me just in case. Between the jigs and spinners, I can cover quite a bit of water (I'm a bank guy... no boat). You can certainly fish jigs in very shallow water and riffles but you have to change your technique a bit. You can sort of manipulate if/how the line is coming off the spool as you pull the float back and let the jig work almost like drift fishing. Deeper water is fantastic with jigs--even slow pools where drifting corkies or effectively fishing spinners would be virtually impossible. Sometimes you have to find water that works for your setup.

Here's what I do:

If the water is right to effectively fish a spinner on the bottom then I use spinners. Can't beat that simplicity. If the water is deep or narrow and I can't get a spinner down to the bottom of where I expect fish to be holding then I use a jig or pink worm under a float.

For me, when I was learning, I found it best to pick a method and then find the right water for that method. Get a book on the method you're starting with (people here on OFF can help with that). Once you get into some fish you'll begin to understand a bit about presentation size, color, reading water, etc. Then you can add gear for another method and learn that. The concepts of water temperature, level, and clarity will remain very similar across the different methods. When the corkie folks are using larger/brighter corkies, the jig folks are probably using larger/brigher jigs and the spinner guys are likely using brighter/larger spinners.

Micah;
You mentioned "I stick to spinners and jigs under a float". I was planning on using a spinner next trip out but never though of running one under a float. Am I hearing this correctly?
If you're using a spinner to get on the bottom, how would you rig it?
I also am working on my first steelie.
 
G

Green_Tackle

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Jan 31, 2009
Messages
118
Location
Portland, OR
I mean I use either spinners OR float jigs. Not a spinner under a float.
 
N

ninja2010

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May 12, 2008
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river right/left
Micah;

If you're using a spinner to get on the bottom, how would you rig it?
I also am working on my first steelie.

if you're trying to fish a deep pool, spinners might be tricky to swing. but you could still bounce it with a weight on a dropper about 3' in front of the spinner. it's a bit tricky to cast out, but you could just lob it out to prevent the spinner from tangling with the dropper.
 
M

meluvtrout

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Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
406
My dear newby friend. For you to be able to get into fish, you need to get the technique down, sure, but you need to only know one other important thing, probably most important thing of all that will save you precious gas, tackle and bait money. That will save you your days of unsuccessful outings and miserable skunks. Believe me I am the skunk master, the guy with broken rods and spinner master with no fish to show (well not anymore).

It's the LOCATION (and of course a really good coach)
Call Damon(metalfisher76), he'll show you how to catch a fish and what works where. 503-816-5623. He only guides during the weekends and charges $100 full day, $60 half day.
 
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W

wozniasm

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Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Messages
745
Location
Formerly Wilsonville now St. Louis
Damon (metalfisher76), he'll show you how to catch a fish and what works where. 503-816-5623. He only guides during the weekends and charges $100 full day, $60 half day.
Ooooh! That's a sweet price! I made a note of it and as soon as I get the $, I'll make the call.
BTW, never using a guide before. what would be the tip?
 
M

meluvtrout

Active member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Messages
406
Damon (metalfisher76), he'll show you how to catch a fish and what works where. 503-816-5623. He only guides during the weekends and charges $100 full day, $60 half day.
Ooooh! That's a sweet price! I made a note of it and as soon as I get the $, I'll make the call.
BTW, never using a guide before. what would be the tip?

$1 per lb. Damon's probably around 190lbs, so do your calculation...
 
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