What to use in the river for trout or steelhead

mijacques

mijacques

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Hey everybody! Spent most of my life fishing for bass in lakes and fishing offshore in Alaska. Live in Oregon City and looking to bank fish the local rivers but kinda lost lol. I have a pretty big selection of poles, reels, and gear but don't really know what to use in the river for trout or steelhead. Any advice would greatly be appreciated!! Thanks!!!
 
maxwyatt

maxwyatt

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I'm still pretty new to steelhead, but I'll take a stab at it. More than anything, the gear you choose will depend on the method you want to use. If you're casting spinners or drifting bait/yarnies a ~6-7ft pole that can take 6-12lb line is probably adequate (I have a couple 6' 6" poles for spinners). Float fishing will require a longer rod. I initially tried to float fish with a 7'6" pole, but it was very apparent, after the first time, that a longer pole was warranted. I picked up a 9'6" Okuma combo for ~$90 and have been fishing with it for a few years. More money will get you nicer gear. Other folks will probably chime in with more specific gear suggestions.
 
mijacques

mijacques

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Thanks for the reply! I'll probably be doing a little of everything. I wanted to try float fishing with a slip bobber. Just trying to figure out what to put on the end of it lol. Probably way overthinking this stuff.
 
maxwyatt

maxwyatt

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FWIW, If I was to buy another pole for float fishing, I'd go with a 10' or longer pole. Makes it easier to mend the line. But it'll be slightly harder to carry through the brush....
 
mijacques

mijacques

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I was just watching a video on mending the line a second ago lol. I'm pretty sure I have a couple poles 8.5 or maybe 9 ft ill have to look. Def a lot more to this than fishing for Mahi or Halibut I'm used to that's for sure!!!
 
Grant22

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I like a 9’6” or a 9’9” I really have not had a ton of times we’re I really needed a 10’ plus rod and they are a lot easier to manage while walking through the bushes. As a bank guy I like an 8-12lb rating because it gives me a bit more backbone and still is light enough to have a fun fight on. A fast or moderate fast action is pretty important too. It’s all preference though. A 9’ would make for an excellent drift fishing setup.
 
mijacques

mijacques

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Nice! I think the longest rod I have at the moment is 8'. I will have to pick up a longer one soon. Then find a spot in the area is the next step I suppose!
 
Grant22

Grant22

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Nice! I think the longest rod I have at the moment is 8'. I will have to pick up a longer one soon. Then find a spot in the area is the next step I suppose!
If you have a tighter budget I would recommend one of buzz Ramsey’s air rods and an okuma ceymar c40 with 30lb braid but if you have a little more money to spend the Okuma guide select pro is a really good option too with the same reel and line.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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@mijacques welcome to Oregon and OFF. Glad to have ya.

It's worthy to mention--since you mentioned trout--that nearly all streams are currently closed to trout fishing. So if you accidentally catch any while steelhead fishing; all trout must be returned unharmed into the water. Be sure to read the reg's for any stream, ahead of going out. Then ask questions if you have any. As Game Wardens/State Troopers EXPECT you to know the reg's BEFORE you hit the water. And will issue citations if you don't.

Lots of folks gravitate towards float fishing. But you can also effectively cover most all holding spots with spinners and spoons too. Spinners for the riffles, tail outs, etc. Spoons to bounce along into the deep pockets.

Rule of thumb for ANY of aforementioned methods...you have to get your OFFering, into the strike zone. So having your gear tick, tick, tick, tick along the bottom is where you want your spoon/spinner/bait.

Tight lines to you and send us some pics and reports!

TD
 
mijacques

mijacques

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Thanks for the info. Ya with the trout and bass about 3 to 4 times a week I will go fish a lake somewhere. Try out a lot of new areas. I keep up with the rules and regs a lot especially since I work on a boat :). But def appreciate all the good information. Trying to get as much fishing in before hand surgery next week :(
 
rogerdodger

rogerdodger

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It is important that your riggin goes at the same speed as the river flow Make sure that you pay attention to that

and it's got to be down near the bottom, bumping it now and then. Don't hesitate to adjust your bobber stop during the day if water flow is changing.
 
Admin

Admin

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It's worthy to mention--since you mentioned trout--that nearly all streams are currently closed to trout fishing.
just got it today in my email box from ODFW ;)

Best bets for fishing

  • Trout anglers who prefer moving water, should focus on rivers that are open year-round and fish throughout the winter. Likely suspects include the lower Deschutes, Crooked, Metolius, Fall, Blitzen, Chewaucan and Wallowa rivers.
 
mijacques

mijacques

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just got it today in my email box from ODFW ;)

Best bets for fishing

  • Trout anglers who prefer moving water, should focus on rivers that are open year-round and fish throughout the winter. Likely suspects include the lower Deschutes, Crooked, Metolius, Fall, Blitzen, Chewaucan and Wallowa rivers.
Lucky! Why didn't I get that email lol :)
 
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