Tidewater Steelhead?

N

n8r1

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Feb 17, 2010
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334
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Portland, OR
Ok, before posting this I did a forum search, and really found no information on fishing tidewater for steelhead.

So I'm curious...has anybody had any luck catching steel in tidewater? I mean true, brackish tidewater, the kind of water full of sculpins, flounder, and dungeness crab. I'm not asking you to give out your "honey holes," I've already got my location picked out. I'm just wondering if I'm going to be wasting my time or if I've got a shot at a fish.

Finally, what method(s) would work? Plunking seems to be the most obvious option, although I could envision the previously mentioned sculpins/crabs/flounder messing with my rig non-stop.

Also, is there a tide preference? (Low, high, incoming, outgoing)

Thanks!
 
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F

fish4life

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Oct 24, 2010
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molalla,or
I know the one year they were catching some in wilson tidewater while bobber fishing for salmon, but I think it is uncommon because iI think they move right through tidewater pretty fast to the lower part of the rivers to wait for rain unlike salmon that wait in the tidewater until it rains. I would think that trolling or casting spinners would work that way you can work as much water as possible.
 
N

n8r1

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Portland, OR
I was afraid of that. Casting spinners would be the only option until I get a motor on my little boat.
 
S

SantiamDrifter

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Mar 13, 2010
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Salem
Yeah steelhead book it through the tide waters. I've seen them caught while salmon fishing but I'd say you would be wasting your time. Just head to where the current starts picking up.
 
B

Bad Tuna

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Jan 3, 2011
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Gilligans Island
I've had good luck trolling blue fox spinners and very good luck trolling orange wiggle warts around Woods bridge on the nestucca. At very low water, steelhead DO hold in tidewater
 
N

n8r1

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Location
Portland, OR
The reason that I ask in the first place is that I'm heading over to our place on the coast on Friday afternoon. Our place is right on the tidewater, about 1/4 mile from the ocean. I should arrive around 3:30 in the afternoon, which isn't much time to drop off my stuff and head back out to a river. So I'm hoping to walk out, break out a lawnchair, crack open a cold frosty one, cast out a plunking setup, and sit back and wait for my rod tip to (hopefully) go down.

If plunking isn't a good option I could cast some spinners or wigglers as some of you already mentioned.

Here's a view from our patio, I'm hoping to cast out and then kick my feet up on the deck below and relax, watch the sun set, drink a couple beers, and if I'm lucky, hook into a steelhead.
 

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L

Letemgo

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Jan 5, 2011
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Canby, Oregon
If nothing else, you will have nice weather and a relaxing afternoon regardless of your fishing success. That said, if you are going to be there for the weekend and have time, take your boat up to where tidal influence stops. I don't know the river you are on but I did just that on the Alsea in ealy November with my drift boat a few years ago for fall chinook and just anchored. During the incoming and slack tide, we fished bobber and eggs with no success. When the tide started to go out and the current picked up we switched to qwickfish wrapped with herring. My partner had a fish on in less than an hour and it turned out to be a steelhead. Steve
 
C

crusty old fisherman

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Jul 26, 2009
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95
Location
Eugene
when the water was is high and I plunk for them I am actually plunking in tidewater and we get them same as up the river.


crusty
 
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