The slime

B
bigdog
I really have to know what is it that causes the slime on the fish that we all have to deal with. How long can it be produced and why doesn't it stop after the fish is dead? I mean like when we smoke them go through everything fillet them descal them or not and it just keeps coming.By morning after soking its a slimy mess. Would think that it couldn't produce that after they are dead but seems to get wores after they die and even more so after cleaning them and everything eles. So I don't just something that came across my little mind and had to ask to see if I'm the only one wondering or if someone knows why it happens.
CJ
 
B
Boywhofishes
i know that if the fish gets dry.... when you wet it to clean in it produces even more slime... it may be a defense?... you know to slip out of big mean bear claws?...:think: just a thought ;)
 
P
phish-on
found this....
Fish secrete a mucoprotein protective slime coat that covers the scales and skin. This slime coat acts as a defense against invasion by bacterial, parasitic, and fungal pathogens.

Essential electrolytes necessary for osmoregulation are lost through breaks that may occur in the skin and slime coat, causing dangerous stress. Open wounds and abrasions caused by handling and netting are readily attacked by disease organisms, resulting in further stress and disease. Every fish has a natural mucoprotein or "slime" coating covering its skin and scales. The slime coating is the fish's first line of defense against infection.

The slime coating contains enzymes and antibodies to fight infection. The slime coating acts as a shield against disease causing organisms in the fish's external environment. It also acts as a barrier to prevent loss of internal electrolytes and body fluids. When even a small portion of the slime coating is removed, the fish will bleed electrolytes from its body into the surrounding water.

Beneath the fish's mucoprotein coating (slime coat) are its scales which can extend to the outer skin surface from the underlying dermal connective tissue. Beneath the scales in a fish's skin is the epidermis, comprising several layers of cells. The fish epidermis is distinguished from mammalian epidermis in that mammals require hardened layers of skin to prevent dehydration, whereas in the aquatic environment, the fish has no need for such protection. Thus, unlike the case in mammals, mitosis is usually seen in the lower layer of the epidermal layer of a fish. Beneath the epidermis of a fish is the dermis comprising fibrous connective tissue interspersed with black pigment cells. The vascular dermal tissue contains a network of capillaries providing nutrient to the skin.

When a fish is netted, handled or even at times when placed in a stressful situation, such as low oxygen, high carbon dioxide or temperature fluctuations, the slime coating is disturbed, making the fish vulnerable to disease, such as bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases. Particularly when fish are shipped in high concentrations in low volumes of water, they are subject to trauma such as being scraped, bitten and otherwise wounded. Moreover, ammonia, a waste product of fish's digestion and respiration, is released into the water containing fish. Ammonia is also released at high levels by dead fish and decaying food. At high ammonia levels, the fish are subject to ammonia burns which disturb the slime coating and adversely affect the fish.
 
B
bigdog
wow now that was a mouth full lol I think I understood a few of the words in it lol
 
P
phish-on
bigdog said:
wow now that was a mouth full lol I think I understood a few of the words in it lol
you understood more than i did ;)
thought it was interesting though.
 
B
bigdog
yeah it is just now if I could figure out what it all means lol
 
F
FishFinger
Phish, actually that was a great post. Thanks.
 
F
FishSchooler
The scales are the clothes and slime is the sunscreen. :lol: Wonderful comparison. :clap: :lol: Get it? ;) If a scale is missing, the slime is there to cover it.
 
Raincatcher
Raincatcher
Teamwork, it's what works!

Teamwork, it's what works!

Good question bigdog! Great answer phish-on! A lot of thought in the question and a ton of work for the answer. Both are greatly appreciated.
Barb
 
B
bigdog
Yes thank you very much for that answer phish that does help now if we could only find a way to stop the slime lol
 
P
phish-on
Raincatcher said:
Good question bigdog! Great answer phish-on! A lot of thought in the question and a ton of work for the answer. Both are greatly appreciated.
Barb


ya I spent a lot of time googling:lol:
 
F
FishFinger
bigdog said:
Yes thank you very much for that answer phish that does help now if we could only find a way to stop the slime lol

One sure fire way is puting it in the oven at 325 degrees...
 
B
bigdog
FishFinger said:
One sure fire way is puting it in the oven at 325 degrees...
yeah a little while in the smoker puts a end to it to
 
F
FishSchooler
I just filleted and smoked my first salmon just now... :D It was a beautiful wild 12 lb sockeye salmon, and I caught it from a little river that starts with a c and ends with an o... filleting was the easy part, controlling the smoke was not. So I filleted it, pics are comin soon, and it looked amazing, first time, no bones, perfect. I put some wood in the old stove thing and made a small fire. Small fire turned to big fire because of the oxygen flow of the strong wind. The smoke was going everywhere! So I put the fillets onto wet cedar plank. Then onto the grill thing! I closed it up to get it nice and smoky, but the fire just grew. So much that the cedar plank just caught... So I fought the fire with a spray bottle as my cat watched through the window in amusement... I got the fire under control (or so I though) and I closed the lid. Seconds later, it starts smokin again! I fight it again, and noticed that the fillets were more than ready, then took them off. They didn't look too great, a weird shade of grey and pink... But when I ate them, my mind turned... Amazing! Plus being worry free about bones was great. Thanks all. :D
 
B
bigdog
FishSchooler said:
I just filleted and smoked my first salmon just now... :D It was a beautiful wild 12 lb sockeye salmon, and I caught it from a little river that starts with a c and ends with an o... filleting was the easy part, controlling the smoke was not. So I filleted it, pics are comin soon, and it looked amazing, first time, no bones, perfect. I put some wood in the old stove thing and made a small fire. Small fire turned to big fire because of the oxygen flow of the strong wind. The smoke was going everywhere! So I put the fillets onto wet cedar plank. Then onto the grill thing! I closed it up to get it nice and smoky, but the fire just grew. So much that the cedar plank just caught... So I fought the fire with a spray bottle as my cat watched through the window in amusement... I got the fire under control (or so I though) and I closed the lid. Seconds later, it starts smokin again! I fight it again, and noticed that the fillets were more than ready, then took them off. They didn't look too great, a weird shade of grey and pink... But when I ate them, my mind turned... Amazing! Plus being worry free about bones was great. Thanks all. :D

What are you (smoking) your fish on like in a smoker a bbq or what?:think:
CJ
 
T
tnffishman
phish-on said:
found this....
Fish secrete a mucoprotein protective slime coat that covers the scales and skin. This slime coat acts as a defense against invasion by bacterial, parasitic, and fungal pathogens.

Essential electrolytes necessary for osmoregulation are lost through breaks that may occur in the skin and slime coat, causing dangerous stress. Open wounds and abrasions caused by handling and netting are readily attacked by disease organisms, resulting in further stress and disease. Every fish has a natural mucoprotein or "slime" coating covering its skin and scales. The slime coating is the fish's first line of defense against infection.

The slime coating contains enzymes and antibodies to fight infection. The slime coating acts as a shield against disease causing organisms in the fish's external environment. It also acts as a barrier to prevent loss of internal electrolytes and body fluids. When even a small portion of the slime coating is removed, the fish will bleed electrolytes from its body into the surrounding water.

Beneath the fish's mucoprotein coating (slime coat) are its scales which can extend to the outer skin surface from the underlying dermal connective tissue. Beneath the scales in a fish's skin is the epidermis, comprising several layers of cells. The fish epidermis is distinguished from mammalian epidermis in that mammals require hardened layers of skin to prevent dehydration, whereas in the aquatic environment, the fish has no need for such protection. Thus, unlike the case in mammals, mitosis is usually seen in the lower layer of the epidermal layer of a fish. Beneath the epidermis of a fish is the dermis comprising fibrous connective tissue interspersed with black pigment cells. The vascular dermal tissue contains a network of capillaries providing nutrient to the skin.

When a fish is netted, handled or even at times when placed in a stressful situation, such as low oxygen, high carbon dioxide or temperature fluctuations, the slime coating is disturbed, making the fish vulnerable to disease, such as bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases. Particularly when fish are shipped in high concentrations in low volumes of water, they are subject to trauma such as being scraped, bitten and otherwise wounded. Moreover, ammonia, a waste product of fish's digestion and respiration, is released into the water containing fish. Ammonia is also released at high levels by dead fish and decaying food. At high ammonia levels, the fish are subject to ammonia burns which disturb the slime coating and adversely affect the fish.

i watch a lot of fishing shows on tv and they also say that the slime is for protection and if you grab a fish, then let it go back into the water it hurts them severely. but it hasnt stopped me from doing it, and i havnt seen the fish floatin belly up after i let em go:think:
 
Troutski
Troutski
Wet hands...

Wet hands...

tnffishman said:
i watch a lot of fishing shows on tv and they also say that the slime is for protection and if you grab a fish, then let it go back into the water it hurts them severely. but it hasnt stopped me from doing it, and i havnt seen the fish floatin belly up after i let em go:think:

A quick dip of your hands in the water before you touch the fish makes all the difference in the world...

Chuck
 
F
FishSchooler
bigdog said:
What are you (smoking) your fish on like in a smoker a bbq or what?:think:
CJ

Its an old bbq that broke down... didn't bother to get a smoker yet. All I needed to do is get hot embers... not a bonfire... :D

Oh yeah, fish dont float all the time when they die. If they did, wouldnt you see tons of fish be floating in lakes and rivers? And if they did float all the time, imagine the creeks and streams at spawning time when the nooks and 'hos roll around... :shock:
 
F
Fishtopher
Sick!!

Sick!!

Oh jeez, that reminds me...yesterday I was fishing the Sandy and my buddy hooked up about 10 mins after we started fishing. The fish was about 5 ft out when it was confirmed it was in the mouth with the flashlight. Turned off the light, dropped it, and attempted to bank the fish w/out the net. He gets the fish up to the bank, and I reach down for it, and the fish turns tail and starts splashing me in the face with water until I ninja'd the fish up to the rocks. My buddy takes care of his fish, and I return to the water to wash my hands, and pick up my flashlight. I started to notice this funny smell...I happen to look in the water with my light and the fish was doin a burnout in an old dead moldy coho, splashin me in the face with it!!! GGGRRRRRR!!!!!!!
Stupid fish.
 
Troutski
Troutski
There went the breakfast...

There went the breakfast...

Fishtopher said:
Oh jeez, that reminds me...yesterday I was fishing the Sandy and my buddy hooked up about 10 mins after we started fishing. The fish was about 5 ft out when it was confirmed it was in the mouth with the flashlight. Turned off the light, dropped it, and attempted to bank the fish w/out the net. He gets the fish up to the bank, and I reach down for it, and the fish turns tail and starts splashing me in the face with water until I ninja'd the fish up to the rocks. My buddy takes care of his fish, and I return to the water to wash my hands, and pick up my flashlight. I started to notice this funny smell...I happen to look in the water with my light and the fish was doin a burnout in an old dead moldy coho, splashin me in the face with it!!! GGGRRRRRR!!!!!!!
Stupid fish.

Oh; there is just so much wrong with that....I feel for you man, oh there goes dinner....you poor bas#%&$...oh man !!!:(

Chuck
 
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