Summer Steelhead setup?

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kayakkid

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What is a good summer steelhead setup? I will probably be fishing jig and float. I think my winter setup might be a bit heavy for the summers.
 
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Thuggin4Life

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I just learned for winters as well. I would assume small jigs/floats along with lighter line.
 
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steelhead_stalkers

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I like my 9'6 4-8lb steelhead rod for summers. Heck I use it all winter too, its my favorite steelhead rod! Its perfect for float fishing smaller jigs and floats along with side-drifting or drift fishing. Nice light, sensitive tip! Good luck.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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Stalker gave good advice.

Most summer steelie fisherpersons use a rod that is 8' - 9'. But, a longer rod will allow you to fish bobber/bait, jigs, et. a lot better--because you can hold the rod up and keep the line tight to the tackle (off the water, or lightly on it).

And if you have a flexible tip (i think the correct term is "slow action), you can fling spinners and drift rigs with ease too.

A good rule of thumb for line, is about 6 lb. main and 4 lb. leader in gin clear water (or 8 main and 6 leader in darker water).

If you want to improve your success rate with spinners get a copy of this book:

Spinner Fishing for Steelehad, Salmon, and Trout; by Jed Davis. It is the BIBLE of this kind of fishing...and written by a guy who primarily fishes the South Santiam and the Mac.

If you'd like to get parts/components to make your own spinners (and/ or JIGS)...you cannot go wrong w/ Don Green at Fisherman's Shack in Airlie. I was just there today. He is HONEST, and knows his stuff!

Just click on Don's link:

Top Sellers

Good luck!
 
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Troutier Bassier

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Stiff 8'6 Rod, Shimano Symetre reel, 8lb p-line and a R&B Spinner.
 
A

autofisher

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For me it just depends on where I am. If the water's clear, I go small. If the river/creek is low and small..... I go even smaller. I've always had the best luck for summers on spinners......but that's mainly on the North Santiam.
 
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Mad dog

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I like my 9'6 4-8lb steelhead rod for summers. Heck I use it all winter too, its my favorite steelhead rod! Its perfect for float fishing smaller jigs and floats along with side-drifting or drift fishing. Nice light, sensitive tip! Good luck.

My favorite as well! :clap:

I have rods from 9'6 4-8lb, 6-10lb, 8-12lb, 6-15lb all between 8'6 to 9'6 but the 4-8lb 9'6 is by far my favorite! The length seems just about right for protecting lighter leaders while still putting some force on a steelhead. I would suggest a 10lb mainline and 8lb flourocarbon leaders for 75% of all summer fishing. We catch a lot of fish early on 12lb leaders before the water drops....I like 12lb while there are still springers in the river! ;)

If I had to pick a setup for someone specifically for summers....9'6 6-10lb Rogue side drifting rod, Shimano Stradic loaded with 10lb mainline and 8lb flourocarbon leader. That's what I would do!
 
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Thuggin4Life

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I read an article in this fishing book I have. Mostly one warm water fish and back east fishing but there is a guy who fishes the great lakes for chinook and has perfected a trolling method called light lining. He uses 12-14 foot rods and 4lb mainline with 2lb leader for chinook but i think in the lakes a 20lb is common and a 30lber is big. But still 2lb leader? the secrest is the huge rods taking all the stress. And he is a guide and gets many people fish this way. Back on subject I bet having the longer rod for summers is a big plus to using lighter line. Why i have a 7 footer is beyond me.
 
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sparsegreyhackle

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I have used the 9'6 and the 10'6 and am currently using a 10'6 lamiglas certified pro MLS. I like the long sticks simply because they help me control the presentation better.
I have been using a braid for my main line because it floats like a fly line but it has been giving me fits lately and I think Im gonna try a bright mono instead. P-Line makes some that looks like it will work.
Florocarbon leaders and dark jigs dominate , keep em small though,1/8 oz or smaller. summers can get spooky, big jigs can scare the hell out of em or make em mad enough to hit too though.
Reel choice is up to you. I use an old Okuma Inspira and have never had an oz of trouble with it. When it dies though it will probably get replaced with a Pfluger or Shimano.
Add in a pair of good fish seein glasses and your there. Spotin and stalkin summer runs is a hoot!
I fish mostly the McKenzie and the upper Willamette. Have for over 20 years.
Tight lines Bro!
 
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deejay

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I have really got into this whole jig and bobber thing i run this 90 percent of the time in my boat if im not pulling plugs p-line makes a hydro float line that i live by for bobber fishing it keeps your line above water and really matches the current speed dont forget to put a little tip of shrimp on it like half a tail its a killer
 
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steelhead_stalkers

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We have found that the smaller diameter braid like fireline crystal or spiderwire invisibraid works great. I use 10lb on the invisibraid and no joke you can pull line and mend from all the way across the river without your float even moving. Anything over 10lb for the invisibraid and 15lb on the fireline makes for bad results. To much body and the casting goes out the door. I believe the lighter and smaller diameter makes for the perfect float fishing line. They float high in the water and are easy to see. Don't be afraid of braking off fish the 15lb fireline and 10lb spiderwire break at well over 20lbs!! That's plenty for steelhead.

Hydrofloat is ok but the diameter is larger and you still get the same poor casting distance. Try the above and you will be very happy! ;)
 
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deejay

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that makes sense i do have trouble casting that anchor line when im on big rivers i think its like 40lb braid and all i have found it in is high vis and thats not always the most convienent when your in low water situations ill definitly have to try the lighter line thanks for the tip
 
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Derek

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We have found that the smaller diameter braid like fireline crystal or spiderwire invisibraid works great. I use 10lb on the invisibraid and no joke you can pull line and mend from all the way across the river without your float even moving. Anything over 10lb for the invisibraid and 15lb on the fireline makes for bad results. To much body and the casting goes out the door. I believe the lighter and smaller diameter makes for the perfect float fishing line. They float high in the water and are easy to see. Don't be afraid of braking off fish the 15lb fireline and 10lb spiderwire break at well over 20lbs!! That's plenty for steelhead.

Hydrofloat is ok but the diameter is larger and you still get the same poor casting distance. Try the above and you will be very happy! ;)

I agree with the Hydrofloat casting it sucks but other than that it does float nice I just couldn't get it to cast that good at all and took it all off and used the P-line Hi-Vis florecent easy to see but might try out the Fire Line lots of people have been talking good things about it
 
F

First Bite

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What is a good summer steelhead setup? I will probably be fishing jig and float. I think my winter setup might be a bit heavy for the summers.

My favorite summer steelhead setup is a jig and float. I like an 11' or longer rod matched with a shimano 2500 series reel filled with 20-pound braided line. Look for a rod with a fast tip as this will help load up the fish before you set the hook.

I'll use a small round cork (1 1/4") as a fixed float. For leaders I'll start off the season using 8-10# maxima ultragreen dropping down in line weight as the season progresses.

For jigs I like small 1/32 oz size in blood red. Black and purple/cerise patterns work good too.

Mark
 
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SantiamDrifter

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My favorite summer steelhead setup is a jig and float. I like an 11' or longer rod matched with a shimano 2500 series reel filled with 20-pound braided line. Look for a rod with a fast tip as this will help load up the fish before you set the hook.

I'll use a small round cork (1 1/4") as a fixed float. For leaders I'll start off the season using 8-10# maxima ultragreen dropping down in line weight as the season progresses.

For jigs I like small 1/32 oz size in blood red. Black and purple/cerise patterns work good too.

Mark

Mark Anderson, I must say i do like your jigs. I fish a couple of the micro jigs, but am thinkin about adding the shrimp schlappen jig. Its mighty pretty.

Question tho, While running just a cork float and small barrel swivel, how does that riggin cast. I've never tried it, but it would seem extremly light and difficult to get any distance to your cast. The river I float in the summer isn't a small river, and to not spook fish, you have to anchor up far enough away from the fish. So long cast are required.
 
F

First Bite

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Santiam

Thanks for the compliments. The steelhead shrimp tail is one of my top producers.

The small cork does limit your ability to cast longer distances. To alleviate that problem I'll step up to a 1 1/2" cork and then add split shot (3-5) starting about 20" above the jig. Crimp the split shot on shirt button style...spaced about 3" apart or so. The extra weight of the split shot is dual purpose. First it will help you cast further but second and more important it will allow your jig and/or bait to get down quicker.

Another alternative is to use tungsten beads. I like using black tungsten (7/32") combined with the split shot it will allow you to cast as far as necessary.

Mark
 
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SantiamDrifter

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Santiam

Thanks for the compliments. The steelhead shrimp tail is one of my top producers.

The small cork does limit your ability to cast longer distances. To alleviate that problem I'll step up to a 1 1/2" cork and then add split shot (3-5) starting about 20" above the jig. Crimp the split shot on shirt button style...spaced about 3" apart or so. The extra weight of the split shot is dual purpose. First it will help you cast further but second and more important it will allow your jig and/or bait to get down quicker.

Another alternative is to use tungsten beads. I like using black tungsten (7/32") combined with the split shot it will allow you to cast as far as necessary.

Mark

I figured you used split shot. I just didn't see you use any in your video ( I dont think ). Besides your red jig, whats you other favorite low water jigs?
 
F

First Bite

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Santiam

Blood red jigs have accounted for more summer steelhead then all the other color patterns combined. A straight black jig is my second choice and purple schlappen & cerise hackle is another favorite. Earlier in the season I'll use typical winter patterns, ie; pink & shrimp colors. I've caught several incidental Springers in May & June using pink shades too.

Mark
 
S

SantiamDrifter

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Mark, What sort of feathers can you palmer with? Is it just hackle and schlappen?
 
F

First Bite

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I palmer all my feathers the same way. Whether it's schlappen, hackle or marabou. I think it makes for a fuller looking profile in the water.

Mark
 

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