Salmon runs in T-Bay?

S

Sammy Special

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Jul 15, 2009
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4
So, it looks like we are headed for the third year in a row of poor fishing and more importantly, poor spawner numbers. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the longest lived spawners in that run might be 5 yrs old, right?

So....doing the math here and thinking: why is the bay and rivers even open to any fishing at all? One more bad year and we are clearly headed for the point of no return.

Seems to me that we need every fish to get upriver and its at critical levels.

Why is nobody else asking this question?


Sammy
 
R

rainman

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Jul 8, 2009
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214
Location
Monmouth
So, it looks like we are headed for the third year in a row of poor fishing and more importantly, poor spawner numbers. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the longest lived spawners in that run might be 5 yrs old, right?

So....doing the math here and thinking: why is the bay and rivers even open to any fishing at all? One more bad year and we are clearly headed for the point of no return.

Seems to me that we need every fish to get upriver and its at critical levels.

Why is nobody else asking this question?


Sammy

Quoting Sammy "So....doing the math here and thinking: why is the bay and rivers even open to any fishing at all? One more bad year and we are clearly headed for the point of no return".

I believe that the answer to this is obvious... restoring the runs to any kind of former glory is NOT the #1 priority. Politics is prevailing over science here. IMHO

I have a radical 'answer' to this dilemma:
1. a moratorium on ALL retention of salmon/steelhead for <X> years;
2. close hatcheries, invest our tax dollars in hatch boxes;
3. allow fish population to recover before reinstating current harvest numbers.
 
T

tminusmat

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Oct 20, 2009
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3
First off I'm new and just saying hi more or less:)

To comment on the post, I saw a report on another board, which I cannot say is necessarily accurate, that spawining up the many rivers there was not down and was hitting above quota for the rivers capacity. Whether that the quota's are too low maybe a better arguement. And I totally agree if its necessary to close down the bay to get the run back in a few years wouldbe a great idea, except for the economic impact on the area.

I just spent the last week fishing the jaws and GH in the black water conditions and got nothing. I didn't fish real hard though. We had relatives on the boat so it was more about having fun ont he water.

Crabbing has improved though:)

tminusmat
 
K

Kodiak

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Jul 7, 2008
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Mill City, Oregon
NOt SPawners!

NOt SPawners!

The numbers reaching the spawning beds is what is expected, what we are seeing is the last return of the dead zone years. Basically the ocean conditions have been so terrible that the fish have not survived as smolt in the ocean. The other "terrible" fishing problem that Ostupid doesn't take into account is amount of bait they run into when they finally return here. The last two years we have had bait balls streaching on for miles that a hungry nook can't say no too. They get hung up out there eating until the bait leaves, then bonzai up the river like they are late for the hottest date of thier lives. Also the run has been happening later than in the previous decade with the chinook being in fishable numbers of chrome fish all the way through december.
 

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