Fluid bed - does anyone use one

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Growbug

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One of my neighbours just offered me a small (32oz) fluid bed with air pump, etc.

It looks clean and it pushes air through. He states just to dump powder paint in there and then dip heated jig heads in.

Now.. questions.

1- I don't suspect "heating" lead jig heads works too well, what do people do?
2- What paints do i need?
3- Whats the best "jig head" to use with this?
4- is it true you can get some real hippy effects? almost like tie dying (neighbour doesn't remember too much from '65-'72)
 
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Drew9870

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Not exactly sure this answers your question, but my grandpa makes jigs for Yellow Perch called a Boogie Bug. He heats up his jig heads in a little toaster oven like JeannaJigs does (I believe it was her) and just picks them out with pliers and dips them one by one in the jar of powder.

JAYDEE always told me that Vinyl jigs are the ones that rarely chip, so if you are worried about chipping, I'd research vinyl coating.
 
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Doc Crappie

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Fluid Bed

Fluid Bed

1 Heating jigheads can be done in several ways, bic lighter, heat gun.... i use a heat gun you dont heat them hot enough to melt but they do get hot.
2.Power paint is what you will need
3.you can do any jig head or any piece of metal as long as it is hot enough to react to the power paint
4.you can get some good multi color effects but it does take some practice to do multi colors

If you cannot use it I sure could use a bigger fluid bed, keep me in mind if you dont want to mess with it....:pray:
 
J

Jig'n

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Not exactly sure this answers your question, but my grandpa makes jigs for Yellow Perch called a Boogie Bug. He heats up his jig heads in a little toaster oven like JeannaJigs does (I believe it was her) and just picks them out with pliers and dips them one by one in the jar of powder.

JAYDEE always told me that Vinyl jigs are the ones that rarely chip, so if you are worried about chipping, I'd research vinyl coating.

If the powder paint is applied and cured correctly, it will hold up just as well as Vinyl. Powder paint won't kill any brain cells like the overwhelming fumes from Vinyl, and it dry's to the touch in about 30 seconds.
 
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Jig'n

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I use a little propane torch, like one you would use for plumbing. for 1/8-1/4oz heads I hold the lead head in the heat for about 3-4 seconds (keep flame at the lowest/coolest setting) then swish through the powder in my fluid bed.

Let the heads cool, clean out the eye's, then bake in an oven @ 350 for 1 hour to cure the powder paint. Most people don't cure their jig heads after powder painting, this is why the heads chip easily.
 
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Doc Crappie

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you can also use the bed and power paint for adding color to your blades if you make your own spinners works great
 
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slabjig

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I use one quite a bit. The paint you use is powder coating, and the fluid bed percolates air through it, creating an almost liquid mixture of powder and air. You heat a jig head (several ways to do this, torch, hot air gun, toaster oven), dip it in the fluidized powder then reheat to finish melting the coating. Final step is to cure the coated jig in a toaster oven for 10 minutes at around 350 degrees (or whatever time and temperature is specified for the particular powder coating you're using). Powder coating is fast, and the cured product is very tough, plus the unused coating is very stable if you keep it from absorbing moisture.
 
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crawdad1234

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I love powder coating!!! I make fluid beds (sell them) and use them all the time. It does take a little practice though. Sounds like the replies above will do the job. The only thing I do differently is dip it in cold water after you swish it in the fluid bed. Using the fluid bed cuts the costs of powder paint as well as a uniform coating of paint on the jigs. I also bake the jigs in a toaster oven for at least 15 - 20 minutes. This makes it nice, cured and durable!!:)
 
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crawdad1234

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I forgot to mention that curing the jigs is very important!!! It tells you on the jar of powder paint on how long in the oven. Also if the paint smokes or bubbles on the jig than you made the jig to hot. Also very important, make sure there is no paint in the eye of the jig!!! It will be nearly impossible to clean the eyes after you cure the jig in the oven!! Hope this helps :cool:
 
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Jig'n

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The best way I found to clear the jig head eye's is to use a standard X-axcto blade and bust the paint out of both sides of the eye, then use a wire wheel on a Dremel to polish off the the rest of the eye.

Do this before before bakeing/cureing, otherwise you won't get the paint off.
 
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slabjig

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You can salvage jigs with a blocked eye, even after curing by using a red hot wire to melt out the powder coat in the eye. Paper clip works well for this.
 
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crawdad1234

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Excellant idea Slabjig!! Hope I never have to do this as it is a lot of work, but at least I will know what to do!! :) Thanks!!
 
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Diehard

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if you take a very small piece of tin foil and wrap the eyelet of your jig before powder coating you dont have to scrape anything out
 

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