First time using braided line ... just a few questions.

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Spydeyrch

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Hey guys,

I have a just a few questions for you about using braided line on a spinner setup.

I bought my first braided line yesterday. I have it setup on a spinner reel. My setup is basically like this: On the end of my braided line I have a swivel, tied with a palomar knot.

My question is should I use braided line from my swivel to my hooks/lures/flyes/etc? Or should I use normal mono-filament line?

My braided line is a 20lb. line. I have some 8lb. mono-filament line that I could use. I was thinking that it would make more sense to use a mono-filament line with a low strength (like the 8lb line I have) from my swivel to my lures/flies/hooks. That way if something is going to break, it would be the mono-filament and not the braided line. Being that the mono is 8lb and the braided is 20lb, the mono would go first. But, I wanted to get your opinion in this matter. What would you recommend?

I am going to do primarily trout, catfish, pan fish, and bass fishing. Maybe a little later on some steelie but no salmon. I have a 6'6" pole with a spinner on it.

Any ideas on a good way to set up a spinner with braided line? Thanks! :D

-Spydey
 
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JamesB

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For hooks and flies I've had better luck using a mono leader, about 3 feet long. I find mono ties easier and is less visible when in water that is exposed to a lot of sunlight.

For lures I prefer to have the lure hooked directly on the swivel, if I am going to use a swivel at all. For many lures I tie directly to the main lines to get the most spin action (particularly with the newer rooster tails which don't spin as well as the Bangtails).

20# braid and 8# mono seems a bit heavy for trout, but if you can get good casts with it then all the power to you.

Good luck!
 
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Spydeyrch

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I think that 20lb was the only one available at the store that I went to. There may have been a 15lb but it was the same price as the 20lb. I also have a 6lb mono that I could use on the end of the braided if needs be.

Thanks for the info! It has been a LONG time since I did some real fishing. I got 'bit' a little while ago by the fishing bug and just haven't found the cure yet. hahahahahaha.

If anyone else has any other suggestions/ideas/recommendations, their input is very much welcome and appreciated. Thank you.

-Spydey
 
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JeannaJigs

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I ALWAYS run a mono leader. Braid is visible. 'Nuff said.

THAT said...I only use braid on my float rod for steelhead, or when trolling for fall chinook in tidewater, when I want something a little heavier, that takes less space on my spool. I wouldn't think there's any need to use it for anything else, especially not spinners...it floats.
 
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Spydeyrch

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Ok, that makes sense. The reasons why I got it was because I had read, actually in this forum, that the braided line tends to cast further then the mono if using the same setup and same power in the cast. I was having some issues with my mono casting out as far as I wanted it to. I could get it maybe out like max 50 feet but then it would just stop feeding from the reel during the cast. No knots in the line or reel. I could get it further out if I added more weight but that just seem counter productive. It would just drag on the bottom.

So I did some research and found out that the monos seem to have memory and will keep the coils even if cast, thereby diminishing the cast length possible. I also read somewhere that the monos have a little more friction than the braided.

So I got some braided and decided to try it. It seems to run smoother than the mono so far. But I haven't tested it in water yet, so we will see when that time comes. The braided also tends to keep it's straightened shape and so comes off the reel easier and thereby allowing a farther cast.

Thanks everyone for the info, I really appreciate it. Any more info is always welcome.

-Spydey
 
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JeannaJigs

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True it does cast smoother, but it does do some damage to your line guides and your reel, so you gotta weight the benefits. The thing with mono is it's guaranteed to acquire memory. Under normal circumstances, I find my mono is only good for about two trips throwing spinners before the need to respool, but that's personal preference/lack of tolerance to put up with it. They do have some stuff called "reel magic' or something like that, that you can spray onto the mono on your spool when you first respool and it reduces the memory, I've had it sprayed onto my spool when I bought a new reel and the shop included a free spooling, it did make quite a difference.

Also, using lighter mono, increases your manageablity. use the lightest line you think you can get away with. You don't need 20 pound line if you're not chasing salmon. Heaviest line I use for steelhead is 12, with either a 6, 8, or 10 pound leader, depending on water conditions. Trout get the 6 pound mainline, 4 pound leader treatment.
 
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Spydeyrch

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Great info JeannaJigs! Thanks a ton! One quick question, are there braided lines with lower weight tolerances? I couldn't find any yesterday. I think that the lowest was a 15lb. Also, what kind of damage does it inflict on a reel and line guides? The line tha tI got states that it is coated with teflon for smoother casts and retreives. although I did notice that the green coloring comes off of the line extremely easy. Any thoughts on this?

-Spydey
 
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JeannaJigs

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I know Power Pro makes a 12 pound braid. I hate it, because it's too limp, and when fishing in the rain during the winter...wet line gets sticky, and likes to wrap around the tip. I usually run a 20 pound braid just because it's not so limp, not because I need the 20 pound rating. Braid cuts into your guides and your spool, and bail, ultimately causing damage. There are some new float rods that have specialized line guides that are resistant to the damage, but, most rods don't. The color fades. It's colored up all nice to catch your eye when it's sold...and after a few uses it fades out. Can't avoid it.
 
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Spydeyrch

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Yeah, I am not too worried about the color coming off. I figured that it would happen sooner or later with normal use.

About the damage: WOW!!! I wasn't aware of that a braided line could do that. I am not too worried though as my spool, guides, and I think my bail too, are all metal.

So I think that I will try the 20lb braided as the main line with a 4, 6, or 8 lb mono lead line and see if I like it or not. I can always switch later.

Thanks again for your info.

-Spydey
 
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GDBrown

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Most people use the braided lines because it is more resistant to abrasion. It is also smaller in diameter for the same strength as mono, 15lb braid being the same diameter as 4lb mono,etc. Most of us have difficulty getting long casts from spinning setups because we don't have enough line on the reel. I know that as I loose line during the season and there is less on the reel my casting distance diminishes accordingly. A longer rod may help that to some extent but not if you don't use it correctly, something I'm still working on. I am slowly learning that I'm overdoing it when it comes to line strength, I landed a 30# Chinook last December while trying to bobber and jig for steelhead. As hard as I pulled the rod and line held just fine.

It used to be said that with mono line the knot strength was the limiting factor in overall strength and I guess the same could be said of any line but braided lines loose very little due to terminal attachments. So where I used to think I needed 30# main line, I'm inclined to think that 15-20# braid is more than enough now. The braid also floats until it becomes waterlogged if that makes any difference to you.
 
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Spydeyrch

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Hey thanks GDBrown. I appreciate the input. Yeah, so I have a 20# braided as my main line and will probably use a 4/6/8# mono leader. I don't really care if it floats or sinks too much.

What I really would like to do is get back into fishing as it has been like 15 years (back when I was 13) since I did some true fishing. I would LOVE to get into fly fishing. It just looks so ....... zen-ish. I do a lot of rock climbing, hiking, alpine climbing, mountain biking, and all of those activities are very "zen-ish" for me. They just bring me a sense of inner peace and tranquility. Fishing does that for me too but it seems to me like fly fishing would do it even more.

Anywho, back onto the topic. The long casts issue I don't think was due to lack of line. I had plenty of line on my reel. But for some reason, I would cast out and at about 30-50 ft. out, it would just stop moving forward. It wouldn't jerk as if I yanked on the line all-of-a-sudden. But, it almost seemed as if the main line was wound sooo tightly in between the the other coils on the reel that they were "grabbing" each other. Hope that makes sense. I didn't spool it. It already came spooled so I just used that line even though I had a reel of line that I could have used.

Last night when I took it off and re-spooled with the braided line, the mono was like 200 yards! So I don't think it was due to lack of line. I could get it out further with a heavier weight but that was just ridiculous because it would just drag on the bottom and get snagged.

Thanks again for all your input and advice. This is great!!! Keep the info/suggestions/recommendations coming. I bet others have questions like I do so hopefully this helps others besides just me.

-Spydey
 
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GDBrown

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Two things to add. If you are in the river fishing and you don't snag the bottom occasionally you are not fishing deep enough. Fish in rivers are usually on the bottom because there is less chance of being caught by a predator and because they can hold one position without expending a lot of energy. As far as fly fishing goes, it is not that difficult to learn, check the section of Fly Fishing in Oregon. There is lots of information about how to start and what you can do without needing to know how to cast a fly! It is more about fishing than catching for me, I cannot fly fish and think about anything else at the same time so I use it for my mental stability.... And I need it right now so I'm heading for the coast with my 4wt to spend a few hours Lost in Fish!

Do you want to join me?
 
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Spydeyrch

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thanks a ton GDBrown for the invitation. I really appreciate it. I would love to go but I am working right now (hehehehehe). Plus I am heading down to my mother's ranch (out side of Salem/Dallas in Falls City) with my wife and kids right after work. But I am excited because there is a private lake that we were invited to tomorrow and supposedly it has wild trout & bass. So I will get to try out my new rigging and see if i like the 20# braided line.

Next weekend, saturday, a friend and I are planning to hit the Wilson. Not sure exactly where we are going to go on it but we have a few ideas. We will be banking and wading it, no boats. :-( If you would like to join us, you are more than welcome to do so.

I am over here in beaverton, right off of 185th and TV Hwy. My friend lives in Forest Grove so I would pass by Hillsboro to get to his place and then out on hwy 8 until it hits 6 right there next to Dormans Pond. Then from there off to one of the holes we were thinking about hitting. He usually takes his brother and a friend too.

PM me if you would like to join us next Saturday. Again, thanks for the invite, I am seriously tempted but I have a 2 hour drive from here to get to my mother's place. So I am going to have to pass. But hopefully you can catch (no pun intended) us next weekend and give us some pointers. I know we could us it as we are all noobs (newbies). Thanks!!!!!!

-Spydey
 
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steelhead_stalkers

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Most rods these days have guides that are many times stronger than needed to run braid. Actually guides are so strong and hard that there is very little that can damage them. Only the cheapest rods now days would have any problems with braid messing up the guides. Reels also do not have a problem if it is a reel made to handle the line. People think that its ok to use 50lb braid on a spinning reel because its mono diameter is only 8-10 lb. Run the braid strength that the reel is made to handle. On my light 4-8 lb steelhead float rod I run 10lb fireline crystal braid or stren invisibraid in 15 lb and both break around 15 lbs. They also have more body to them and are not as limp as other braids on the market which I like. Reels, Rods and thier guides can handle braid just fine these days so you don't have to worry. My berkley im7 has had plenty of steelhead and salmon landed on it with braid and those cheap guides look just like new. :lol: Good luck.
 
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Spydeyrch

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thanks Steelhead_stalkers for the info. Just a quick question, where do you get the majority of your gear/hardware/tackle? I was thinking of using Cabelas but then I can't hold it in my hand until I actually buy it and receive it in the mail.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!!!


-Spydey
 
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steelhead_stalkers

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Local tackle shops are always nice if they have what you need. I have had good experiences with Cabelas as well as other online retailers.
 
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ninja2010

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more input/info...

don't worry too much about damage to your guides... i've fished braid for the most part of my fishing life, and have never experienced line cutting into metal, even in the salt - i think that's just physically impossible.

braid gives a lot more sensitivity due to its low/no stretch property, compared to mono.

and braid will not give you the "dang, i shoulda checked my line" syndrome when a fish breaks you off due to knicks from abrasion. braid don't knick like mono - they just break off if you scrape them on sharp rocks and surfaces - and you re-tie.

if you're trolling plugs or fishing jerkbaits/crankbaits, forget the mono leader. just go straight from braid to lure - way more sensitive, and if you hang up, you could even horse your lure back (especially those expensive crankbaits) by straightlining your rod and walking backwards to straighten the hook or rip the weeds out.

braid lasts longer than mono - especially if you fish in the sun. after several seasons, you can just unspool your old braid, and respool it back, but flipped - tie the old end of the line to the spool and you'll end up with the fresh end on top. it's like having two lines in one spool.

just sayin'...
 
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Spydeyrch

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Hey ninja2010, thanks for the info. Great stuff there!! Those are the kind of pointers that I was looking for, along with everything else that everyone else has input/shared. Thanks again. That idea about the unspool flip and respool is great!! I would have never thought of that myself.

Tomorrow morning I am off to do some fishing so hopefully I will come back with some good tales of the once that got away and some good pics of the ones that didn't. Thanks again to everyone.

-Spydey
 
kirkster

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I have no idea. And it's gettin dark fast.
just my two cents

just my two cents

I run 50# xp and have ran it on my lamiglas drift rod for the past three years. I can run a cotton ball through all the eyes without a single hang up. Not saying it won't damage the guides but in my opinion it would take along time. Some say it spooks fish, last fri. I hooked four summers and landed two and yesterday I hooked two and landed one. So spook fish? And one other point is since I started drift fishing braided three years ago I've saved enough cash in lead and just upgraded to a lamiglas xmg50 with a revo sx.
 
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Finneus Polebender

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As far as the bass go no prob goin straight to a swivel /lure/hook think from the above reply may not even be an issue for the rest . Use braid religously when targeting big fish , only took a couple line snaps ,and spongy hooksets to change my mind , braid has awesome sensitivity and once I figured out a good braid knot ,not much has escaped my baitcasting setup spooled w/20 lb spiderwire. Once again just preference but usually change my line out twice a year , but bass fishin I run it across all kinds of rough stuff.
 

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