Do spoons work for you?

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SmallStreams

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I've had some success at getting strikes with a Lure Jensen Krokodile wobbler, but the classic spoon has drawn nothing. Is there something I'm missing with spoons or do y'all have low success rates with them?

Spinners and rapala plugs have been doing okay for me, too. It's only with spoons that I get no action from the fish.
 
M

Mike123

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Depends on the type of water.. I do good with Little Cleos and Stee-Lees. I always fish them slow as possible right on the bottom. Let the current do all the work. You don't want the spoon to get going to fast and spin. Seems the native steelhead LOVE spoons more than any other fish I've caught.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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I've caught plenty of trout w/ Kastmasters, and so have many others on OFF.

I have also caught many fish w/ Steelies, Daredevil's, and more recently Little Cleo's. In fact, the brass colored Little Cleo's work so well, that it is the first thing that I put in the water when Trolling. I usually try wedding rings or rooster tails on the other rod.

I'd say kept on trying, until you figure out the best way to use them. Because they do work well for many of us.
 
B

Bucknasty

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Im gonna start sounding like a broken record recommending books but "spoons" have a lot of specific purposes and are not an "IF ALL ELSE FAILS" technique like so many people think they are. Each spoon is shaped and weighted specifically for specific types of water, To truly understand that and maximize the effects of fishing with each type of spoon get Bill Herzogs book.. Spoon fishing for steelhead ($11.99 at bi mart) .. Its packed full of info and just like jed davis's spinner book, Bill Herzogs book greatly improved my success rate with spoons, Now its my FAVORITE!! A couple of chapters speak specifically to the shapes of spoons and how they act in water because of there shape, Its very helpful because after you study it you can go look at a spoon still in the package and know how that spoon will fish! Hope this helps!! Cheers, Bob
 
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beaverfan

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I'm gonna have to pick u that book. Sounds like a good read. I have had pretty good success with spoons. As mentioned above slowly retrieving it right on the bottom is the way I've had the best success.
 
B

bigdog

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I have only caught one fish on a spoon so far but I also haven't fished with them much either. It all depends on the water condition, from what I know spoons are best in the faster running water in between the deep holding holes.
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

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Hey,thanks for sharing the info you guys. I had the same question and the same luck. Funny how we don't think to ask the question if we are having even just alittle success with gear. Anyway,thanks.
 
F

fishingfreak

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I have caught 5 Winter steelhead on Spoons in the Clack this year. I do the same thing let the rapids do the work and keep them close to the bottom. I loose more on snags though! But that is where the fish are by the snags! Darn Native Rocks anyway!

FF
 
M

metalmania

R and B or rvrfshr spoons work awesome for both winter and summer steelhead, as well as chinook. I typically use the 2/5 oz in either brass or copper, always hammered. Spoons are probably my favorite way to catch steelhead, mostly because of the violent hits you get, but also because most of the fish I get on spoons are larger than my average drift fishing or bobber caught steelies. That doesn't mean that a tiny 4lb summer won't hit a 2/5 oz spoon.
 
Y

Yohan

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I fly fish probably 95% of the time, but when I do pick up the spinning rod I almost exclusively throw spoons. So fun to fish and the strikes are awesome. "Swing" the spoon... cast straight across the river, reel in slow and let the current do the work. My favorite spoon for Cohos are Dick Nites (50/50's are the best IMO, but all colors work) fished with 3' of leader off a tri-swivel or, with a slider weight setup. For steelfaces, read metalmanias post. Oh ya, daredevils are pretty awesome as well.
 
kirkster

kirkster

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I have no idea. And it's gettin dark fast.
I have caught 5 Winter steelhead on Spoons in the Clack this year. I do the same thing let the rapids do the work and keep them close to the bottom. I loose more on snags though! But that is where the fish are by the snags! Darn Native Rocks anyway!

FF
if your interested in loosing less hardware. I've used the brass little cleo and had great success for winter fish. But for less hang ups I get rid of the trebble hook and switch out to a siwash. Its made a huge difference on lost gear.
 
R

rippin fish lips

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if your interested in loosing less hardware. I've used the brass little cleo and had great success for winter fish. But for less hang ups I get rid of the trebble hook and switch out to a siwash. Its made a huge difference on lost gear.

less hook ups tho, but when you do get hooked up into a salmon/steelie i bet its hooked pretty darn good?
 
Irishrover

Irishrover

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Bucknasty you are dead bang right!! Bill Herzogs book on spoons is a great read. Before I started wipping flies around on the spey rod I used to toss a lot of spinners and spoons. Last year I picked up Bills book to add to my collection. Using a spey rod can take up bank space and when there are lots of folks fishing it doesn't fit in so well. I'd be a first class chump to try, so now I bring along the spinning gear and a hand full of my favorite spoons (steelies) to use when there are other folks on the bank to consider. I was suprised to read how much there was to learn about the correct way to use spoons. I used to use them on the Salmon River (Mt Hood) and they were deadly for steelhead. I do as Kirkster mentioned and go with a siwash hook. Cast across the river and let the spoon flutter its way through the swing then slow retreive. Think I'll have a wee bit more coffee, grab the grear and go toss some spoons into the Sandy;)
 
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ninja2010

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so now I bring along the spinning gear and a hand full of my favorite spoons (steelies) to use when there are other folks on the bank to consider.

what???? really???? why don't you just tie one at the end of the tippet of your st. croix?
 
kirkster

kirkster

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I have no idea. And it's gettin dark fast.
less hook ups tho, but when you do get hooked up into a salmon/steelie i bet its hooked pretty darn good?

Im not sure if thats a question or if your reply ended with a question mark. But those who think they have to have a trebble hook because a single hook wont hook up as well... Probably doesn't keep his hooks sharp. The main reason I started using the siwash. Was when I started hitting the washington rivers and a lot of there rivers have a non bouyant lure restriction. just keep em sharp and they are just as effective.
 
C

Coho Kid

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My first steelhead came on a plain brass spoon near the mouth of the Clackamas when I was 11. I still pick up one now and again with a spoon side drifting through the quick water. I've pretty much only used Little Cleo's for the last few years because the action makes that thump thump that seems to provoke Chinook bites.
 
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