Cure Ban

K

Kodiak

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Mill City, Oregon
Oregon Department of F******and Wildlife are currently in the begining stages of working to a ban on all egg and bait cures in the state. They are sighting smolt deaths as the primary reason. ODFW is attacking fisherman instead of dealing with the real problem of smolt survival (Alsea river winter steelhead smolt suffer Avian predation rates as high as 80% some years). A reduction in avain predation needs to be addressed first before baning cures. Please call or write your state rep and ODFW and let them know that attacking fisherman instead of the real problem will not be tolerated.
Thanks,
Phill
 
M

Mike123

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OMG... give me a break. Maybe they should feed the dam smolts a different way so they aren't getting picked off by birds constantly!
Release food under water so these retarded smolt aren't sitting on top of the water going after anything that touches the surface.

Keep restricting the PAYING fisherman... dont think of anything else. :protest:

Oh and not to mention how that would affect the economy in certain ways.
 
F

FishKiller23

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Portland, OR
Wow man that is just crazy. Do u have a link to the source or is there a article about this?
 
M

metalmania

Are you &%*#!&^ kidding me. What we need is a cormorant season.
 
K

Kodiak

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Mill City, Oregon
They held a preliminary meeting in albany last week. If you weren't invited you didn't know about it. Several of us with cures were kept in the dark as we tend to raise haides at garbage like that. They want to get the sulfites out of the water sheds but won't go after sewage and businesses. They are doing "further studies" but we need to head this crap off at the pass. Cal however you can get nasty on the phone, face to face..It's time to stand up and fight. We think it's in retaliation for trying to ban gil nets in the legislature last session....I just love a good conspiracy theroy.:confused:
 
F

FishKiller23

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Portland, OR
They held a preliminary meeting in albany last week. If you weren't invited you didn't know about it. Several of us with cures were kept in the dark as we tend to raise haides at garbage like that. They want to get the sulfites out of the water sheds but won't go after sewage and businesses. They are doing "further studies" but we need to head this crap off at the pass. Cal however you can get nasty on the phone, face to face..It's time to stand up and fight. We think it's in retaliation for trying to ban gil nets in the legislature last session....I just love a good conspiracy theroy.:confused:


Thanks for putting this stuff out. Otherwise a lot of us would have had no idea. I'll for sure do my part. A letter and a few phone calls and what ever else that will help.
 
K

Kodiak

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Mill City, Oregon
They believe the sulfites cause internal organ failure, and gill problems...but the gill nets when they return don't. ODFW doesn't want you to catch fish or shoot deer, just buy your license and tags and go home.
 
G

GraphiteZen

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Corvallis, Oregon
I'll tell you if I ate a bunch of derned boraxo I would probably die too!
 
T

TTFishon

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Mohawk valley, Oregon
They believe the sulfites cause internal organ failure, and gill problems...but the gill nets when they return don't. ODFW doesn't want you to catch fish or shoot deer, just buy your license and tags and go home.

If this is a proven fact wouldn't you want to stop using cure?
 
K

Kodiak

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Mill City, Oregon
If this is a proven fact wouldn't you want to stop using cure?

Thier are larger amounts of sulfites comming from sewage plants, lumber mills, and such on a daily basis that they are exposed to. After howmany years that want to crack down on anglers and not deal with the problem. Second after what ODFW has done in the past I'm not sure I would trust thier studies and would want it done by an outside group. It is far easier to put it on sport cures than deal with the real problems at hand. If they prove that the sulfites are killing large amounts of smolt...and that it is directley related I will find another way to cure up eggs that won't kill smolt...If this were the case though why isn't washington, california, Idaho, British Columbia, and Alaska doing it?
 
J

Jacks Tackle

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Mar 1, 2009
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this actually came about from a request for money from the Oregon R & E board. It is just a study that at this time still has a lot of holes in it. Lets not get ahead of ourselves.


RB
 
H

here2fish

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p town
this actually came about from a request for money from the Oregon R & E board. It is just a study that at this time still has a lot of holes in it. Lets not get ahead of ourselves.


RB

I wish you would put your 2 cents in here as often as you do on ifish.

no sarcasm. You know your stuff.
 
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F

FishSchooler

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How would a salt-sugar cure kill a smolt? All the shrimp that I use is just salt-sugar cured.
 
X

xtremenorthwest

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Oregon
History Lesson on Sulfites...
Sulfites in Food, What They Are, Where They're Found, and When to Avoid Them...

Sulfites are added to many processed foods and beverages as preservatives. While safe for most people, they can cause allergic reactions in some, especially asthmatics.


Sulfites are a group of sulfur-based compounds that sometimes occur naturally and sometimes are added to foods primarily as preservatives. Sulfites, bisulfites, and metabisulfites are the dry chemical forms of the gas, sulfur dioxide. According to the Food Marketing Institute, the food industry uses six sulfiting agents. Any of these ingredients found on a nutrition label means the product contains sulfites:

Sulfur dioxide
Sodium sulfite
Sodium bisulfite
Potassium bisulfite
Sodium metabisulfite
Potassium metabisulfite
Where Sulfites are Found
Sulfur-based preservatives have been used for centuries to prevent browning on fruits and vegetables, to prevent black spots on seafood, to discourage bacterial growth in fermented beverages, and to condition bread dough.

In the 1980s the FDA began prohibiting the use of sulfites on fresh fruits and vegetables meant to be eaten raw (such as restaurant salad bars and supermarket produce), and they required companies to list all sulfiting agents used as preservatives in concentrations of at least 10 parts per million (ppm). Although sulfites are no longer added to most fresh foods, they still are found in many cooked and processed foods—and in some foods they occur naturally. Here is a partial list of foods that might contain sulfites:

Bakery goods such as cookies, tortillas, waffles, pie/pizza crusts, breads containing dough conditioners
Condiments such as horseradish, relish, pickles, olives, wine vinegar
Fresh grapes (sulfites can be used on grapes as a fungicide)
Dried and glacéed fruit , Maraschino cherries
Bottled lemon and lime juice
Jams and jellies
Canned and frozen vegetables
Vegetable juices
Guacamole
Molasses
Shredded coconut
Shrimp, scallops, lobster, crab, clams
Soy protein products such as tofu
Processed cheese foods
Gravy
Soup, noodle, and rice mixes
Trail mix
Potato and tortilla chips
Dehydrated, pre-cut or peeled potatoes
Beer, wine, wine coolers, cocktail mixes, hard cider
Tea concentrates and instant tea
Sulfites in Wine
Because yeast produces sulfites during fermentation, sulfites are a natural by-product of the wine-making process. However, almost all winemakers add an additional small amount of sulfites to act as a preservative. Although the United States requires a sulfite warning label, all countries add sulfites to their wines; they simply aren’t required to list the fact on the label. Wine without added sulfites will last approximately 18 months.

What About Organic Wine?
According to the Organic Consumer’s Association, organic wine in the United States must be made without added sulfites. A wine labeled “organic” may still contain naturally-occurring sulfites; however, the sulfite level must be less than 20 ppm.

Do Sulfites Cause Headaches?
Many people believe the sulfites in wine, particularly red wine, cause headaches. Not true, states Andrew L. Waterhouse, internationally recognized wine chemist and Professor of Enology at University of California at Davis.

Dr. Waterhouse suggests that anyone believing sulfites cause headaches should eat a few orange-colored dried apricots, a 2-ounce serving of which contains approximately 112 mg sulfites. United States law stipulates that wines cannot contain more than 350 mg per liter sulfites, and that wines in excess of 10 mg per liter must have a warning label. White wines actually have slightly more sulfites than red wines. Apparently, something in red wines does cause headaches, but researchers don’t yet know what that is.

When to Avoid Sulfites
Sulfites are safe for most people. However, the FDA estimates that 1 out of 100 people are sensitive to sulfites and that approximately 5% of those with asthma are at risk of suffering an adverse reaction to sulfites. People can develop sulfite allergies at any point in life. While the most common symptom is breathing difficulty, reported allergic responses have also included chest tightness, dizziness, nausea, cramps, hives, and wheezing. In extreme (and fairly rare) cases, sulfites can cause anaphylactic shock.

For anyone with sulfite allergies it is important not to assume any food is safe. Diligently read all nutrition labels, including labels on bulk bins (ask to check the ingredient label on the original package, if necessary). In restaurants, ask the chef or server if sulfites are used in any food items—before, during or after preparation. When ordering potatoes, choose baked. Asthmatics should always carry an inhaler, and anyone who has had a reaction to sulfites should carry antihistamine.



There are Foods with Sulphites they better ban before it kills human's:lol:

Any food in the four major food groups (boxes, bags, cans or bottles) may contain sulphites. Fresh fruits and vegetables may also be sprayed with sulphites to extend shelf life. Some products may list sulphites on labels, while others do not. Some foods contain naturally occurring sulphites, such as grapes. Below is a partial list.

Alcoholic/non-alcoholic beer, cider, wine, colored alcohols

Baked goods, e.g., breads, cookies, pastries, waffles
Bottled lemon and lime juice/concentrate

Canned/frozen/dried/glazed fruits and vegetables
Some fresh fruits and vegetables
Fruit filling, fruit syrup, gelatin, jams, marmalade, molasses, pectin

Fruit/vegetable juices
Potatoes, e.g., frozen French fries, dehydrated, mashed, peeled
Tomato paste/pulp/puree

Cereal, cornmeal, cornstarch, crackers, muesli

Condiments, e.g., coleslaw, horseradish, ketchup, mustard, pickles, relish, sauerkraut

Deli meat, hot dogs, sausages

Dressings, gravies, guacamole, sauces, soups, soup mixes

Dried herbs, spices, tea, coffee

Fish, including crustaceans and shellfish
Shake-on meat coatings

Snack foods, e.g., candy, chocolate/fruit bars, tortilla/potato chips, soft drinks, trail mix

Soy products

Starches, e.g., corn, potato, sugar beet, noodles, rice mixes

Sugar syrups, e.g., glucose, glucose solids, syrup dextrose

Vinegar, wine vinegar

*Some foods have naturally occurring sulphites, such as grapes and pork, so it’s difficult to eliminate them. The degree to which you minimize consumption is up to you and what you can tolerate. Winemakers typically add sulphites as a preservative or use metabisulphite as a cleaning agent for bottles. See Eating Safe / Drinking Safe.

I think that they won't ban cures with sulphites because it would put a big hit to my business and others...
 
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F

FishSchooler

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Mar 29, 2008
Messages
1,779
Location
Oregon
sulfites. fishes and sulfites=not compadres.

They come in contact with both salt and sugar in their lives. Salt water, and Im sure some things they eat contain sugar.
 
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