Coloring spinner blades

M

Modest_Man

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Today I picked up the basics to make a few spinners for the first time. Went to BC angling post, talked to the owner for a while. Nice guy.

I picked up some of the vinyl sticker sheets to color the blade with, what is the best way to apply this (get from the sheet onto the blade)? Is this a better approach than just rattle canning it? Any other good (cheap) ways to color them?

I can tell I'm going to go buy some round nose pliers, normal needle nose work but not that well...

Here's a quick and dirty photo of my very first attempt. You can see where the sticker is pretty rough around the edges. I also think the wire shaft might be a tad long. This spinner is only a size one.
5034915079_7dc6867e77_b.jpg
 
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B

Born2Fish55

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I tried the 'sheet stuff' and did not like it! I also tried the 'Krylon' sprays, if you are not doing a whole bunch in the exact same color, they are kind of a waste and you end up with lots of overspray. And having to ask someone to 'unlock the paint cage' can be a royal pain in the old backside... However some of the smaller vehicle touch up cans and modeler cans come in handy from time to time.

I have been using nail polish on my lures and spinner blades... then coat it with 'Sally Hansen Hard as Nails' to add some armor to it. I do not buy the real good stuff and thin out what I do get to allow thinner coats. Also if you watch the ads and sales, you can get quite a bit and a lot of various colors for very little cost.

Scuff them with some 400# grit paper, paint on a base coat, add two or three color coats, then top with the 'Sally Hansen' and let each layer cure under a heat lamp. You can add spot, multiple colors, stripes, fades, candy coats, metallic coats, glitter, and whatever else tickles your fancy. Best part is, you do not need to clean the brush as it stores inside of the bottle. If you like, you can spray it with a airbrush and get some really fantastic designs and detail if you thin it enough. Just open the sample bottles and try them on your thumb nail until you find the color(s) that fit what you want.

The down side is that the clerks at your local Fred Meyer will begin to look at you strange and ask if you need any help. Security will start to circle if you are over in the area too long... The women shoppers will start to give you a really wide berth and walk out of their way to keep away from you too... just something 'strange' about a guy trying all of the various shades of nail polish until they find the colors that work for them!
 
troutdude

troutdude

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You will need at least a size 3 (and usually larger), for most Salmon fishing (assuming that is what you are aiming for at this time of year). I have used size 3's all black (even black tubing on the hook shank), with great success for Fall 'Nooks in low water/dark day conditions. I do not add any paint nor any stick on tape.

Have you read Jed Davis' book (Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon and Trout)? If not, you need to get a copy. You will learn how, where, when to make and scientifically use spinners.

Don Green at Fisherman's Shack in Monmouth, carries that book and the very components in Jed's book. He also carries equipment to build your own spinners.

BTW, when Jed does use/suggest sticky tape for his spinners...he attaches it to the back side of the blade. His theory, is that it changes the appearance of the spinner as it passes by a fish.
 
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Troutski

Troutski

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Dip paints

Dip paints

I like the dip paints, as for the sticker paper...I use custom punches from a craft store.. you can get some crazy designs. I punch out the sticker paper and use a xato(Sp) knife to separate the sticker from the backing and keep the sticker on the blade and use that as my installation tool. Works great... One thing I did learn the hard way...PRIMER when you paint, and use a clear after you have finished. Seems like a ton of work but they ware like iron.
Best of luck and tight lines.

Chuck
 
M

Modest_Man

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I tried the 'sheet stuff' and did not like it! I also tried the 'Krylon' sprays, if you are not doing a whole bunch in the exact same color, they are kind of a waste and you end up with lots of overspray. And having to ask someone to 'unlock the paint cage' can be a royal pain in the old backside... However some of the smaller vehicle touch up cans and modeler cans come in handy from time to time.

I have been using nail polish on my lures and spinner blades... then coat it with 'Sally Hansen Hard as Nails' to add some armor to it. I do not buy the real good stuff and thin out what I do get to allow thinner coats. Also if you watch the ads and sales, you can get quite a bit and a lot of various colors for very little cost.

Scuff them with some 400# grit paper, paint on a base coat, add two or three color coats, then top with the 'Sally Hansen' and let each layer cure under a heat lamp. You can add spot, multiple colors, stripes, fades, candy coats, metallic coats, glitter, and whatever else tickles your fancy. Best part is, you do not need to clean the brush as it stores inside of the bottle. If you like, you can spray it with a airbrush and get some really fantastic designs and detail if you thin it enough. Just open the sample bottles and try them on your thumb nail until you find the color(s) that fit what you want.

The down side is that the clerks at your local Fred Meyer will begin to look at you strange and ask if you need any help. Security will start to circle if you are over in the area too long... The women shoppers will start to give you a really wide berth and walk out of their way to keep away from you too... just something 'strange' about a guy trying all of the various shades of nail polish until they find the colors that work for them!

I actually really like this idea. It's pretty simple and straight forward. And I've always wanted to, you know, have an excuse to shop for nail polish. ;)

You will need at least a size 3 (and usually larger), for most Salmon fishing (assuming that is what you are aiming for at this time of year). I have used size 3's all black (even black tubing on the hook shank), with great success for Fall 'Nooks in low water/dark day conditions. I do not add any paint nor any stick on tape.

Have you read Jed Davis' book (Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon and Trout)? If not, you need to get a copy. You will learn how, where, when to make and scientifically use spinners.

Don Green at Fisherman's Shack in Monmouth, carries that book and the very components in Jed's book. He also carries equipment to build your own spinners.

BTW, when Jed does use/suggest sticky tape for his spinners...he attaches it to the back side of the blade. His theory, is that it changes the appearance of the spinner as it passes by a fish.

These first few are for trout (hence the size 1). I figured I'd start of small and simple using the most basic components and work up to the larger, more complex spinners.

I have Jed's book on order, I talked with the owner or BC Angling post (Bill Williamson) about it and he said it's a good book, but the most resent publishing date is 1982, when Jed was using a fiberglass rod and a Mitchell reel. Since there have been such huge advancements in the rod and reel since then it makes sense that his lure techniques aren't the gospel when it comes to spinners 30 years later as you have a much more responsive tool in your hands. At least this is what he said.

I like the dip paints, as for the sticker paper...I use custom punches from a craft store.. you can get some crazy designs. I punch out the sticker paper and use a xato(Sp) knife to separate the sticker from the backing and keep the sticker on the blade and use that as my installation tool. Works great... One thing I did learn the hard way...PRIMER when you paint, and use a clear after you have finished. Seems like a ton of work but they ware like iron.
Best of luck and tight lines.

Chuck

Sand, primer, paint, and clear coat seem like more effort (and cost, since I don't have any paints) than it's worth for me right now. Especially on a spinner that I have $1.00 or less invested into it that I'll probably lose.

Thanks for the ideas fellas, I've made a couple more but am going to hold off till I get some round nose pliers to make more. I'll have to go test them out today...
 
troutdude

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I think that my copy of Jed's book is from the mid to late 80's (might be the '82 edition). There may be a more recent version/edition. Check out Amato Publications web site, to get to the bottom of the printed editions.

At any rate, it is not merely the designs that make it a valuable book. It is Jed's scientific research, vast experience, and his practical know-how that makes it a great book. His principles are timeless, and therefore, NOT out dated.

Is using a night crawler for trout an "out dated" principle? The answer is no. And peeps have used that technique for hundreds (maybe thousands of years). Once a principle is tried and true. It is never out dated. The defense rests, your honor.

I do not think that you will be disappointed at all, to scour Jed's book.

Good luck.
 
M

Modest_Man

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1st Printing 1985, Revised 1989, so you're correct. I was simply going off of what Bill said.

In regards to worm fishing, it's been around for hundreds of years but what about inflating worms to keep them off the bottom? Or using a worm stringer to extend the worm the length of the line? Or the use of a bobber? Or using a laser finished hook with monofilimant to keep the worm attached to your graphite pole? It's bit different than a bamboo stick with some line and a bone hook, and more effective too! Even with his most recent revision (1989) the book is over 20 years old. Tried and true does not automatically mean perfected. Has no one in the last 20 years been doing studies and research on spinner technology? I honestly don't know.

Just stirring the pot here, like I said I have the book ordered and am looking forward to reading it. Simply pointing out some of the flaws in your statement. ;)
 
B

Born2Fish55

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I agree with a lot of Jed's book... I bought mine many moons ago... still very valuable information in it... great resource!

I changed up some of my basic Salmon/Steelhead spinners several years ago after seeing some Rep's from Mepps and McMann at the the Sportsman Show. They were giving a demostration of colors, designs and changing conditions have on fishing lures. After seeing them I made some glasses to look through when I paint some of my lures. I also have some various backgrounds that I place behind them to give contrast similiar to what we come across in the outdoors (I noticed a lot of those 'really fancy - gotta have 'em lures do not look as good once you leave that pretty store lighting).

My glasses consist of some red and blue film... simulates depth and clarity of waters... these are some of the colors that they said are lost in the water. Using these allow me to have a better idea of what a fish will really see down there. I also use my backgrounds to simulate various lighting situations we encounter out on the water... clouds, blue sky, bright sunlight and such. my "black" background with the lights turned down is similar to cloudy skies, while my "white" background is more like the blue sky over head... holding the lure up in front of a bright light lets you know what it would sort of look like in direct sunlight. Some of what we would assume would really be bright, eye catching colors and designs often turn into a muddy looking gray with little of no detail.
Some of the basic colors that I have been sticking to are black, white, red, yellow, green and orange with most being the brightest I can find (after they dry). One of my favorite colors for Coastal Steelhead is 'smoked brass'... which is just a decent brass spinner that I 'tint' with the smoke from Bees wax candle smoke. Sometimes I take some yarn and 'hook' it on my spinners hook, then rake it to make it fluff and stick out like Troutdude's avatar.

Anyway, I love these forums, where we can trade ideas, thoughts, and sometime failures in our pursuit of our scaled buddies!
 
troutdude

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Scaled buddies? Fish are the ENEMY! <just kidding> LOL

Hey no prob. '89 was a long time ago, but post-original Jedi's anyway.

Once you get your paws on Jed's book, you will see what I mean about his "principles". E.G. use black on dark / cloudy days or low light, use small (size 0 or 1) sized silver/chrome spinners w/ yellow reflective tape for trout, on bright sunny days, etc. It's all about closely evaluating environmental conditions. Then, selecting the right spinner to match those conditions. It's similar in many ways to fly fishing; and "matching the hatch".

On the other fin, if Jed's idea's can be improved on...I will be first in line to buy that book too--and add it to my ever growing collection.

P.S. YEP, I love OFF and being able to exchange ideas, methods, places to go, downturns in personal catch rates, broken lines (with a 60 pound nook on the other end), the jovial nature of other fishing peeps, when to watch out for banjo toting locals (and Jeanna Jigs), etc. LOL
 
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K

Kelkay

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I like to put clear nail polish that has glitter already in it on my spinner blades, if I want something different. If you would like, you can go over that with either clear nail polish, or you can use epoxy. I used Bug Bond over mine. If you use Bug Bond it is a good idea to coat both sides with it. They are going to be selling it at saltwaterflies.com real soon, if not already. It is a uv light cured product. Still I think for spinner blades, nail polish is just fine. You can spray a bunch with spray paint, and them coat them with nail polish, epoxy, or Bug Bond. (or any other uv light cured product)
 
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B

Born2Fish55

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I like to put clear nail polish that has glitter already in it on my spinner blades, if I want something different. If you would like, you can go over that with either clear nail polish, or you can use epoxy. I used Bug Bond over mine. If you use Bug Bond it is a good idea to coat both sides with it. They are going to be selling it at saltwaterflies.com real soon, if not already. It is a uv light cured product. Still I think for spinner blades, nail polish is just fine. You can spray a bunch with spray paint, and them coat them with nail polish, epoxy, or Bug Bond. (or any other uv light cured product)

Here is a picture of the nail polish on my spinner flies. It is a little hard to tell, but I like the effect it has. You can just do the back of the blade if you prefer.

I like the effect on the blade... I have been experimenting (with good results) with making two colored blades or 'super polishing' one of them!
Another idea I have been playing with is optical fibers.... we had some bits and pieces of scrap at work, so I decided to 'play'... wrapping the spinner (and flies) with the fiber and ending it pointed back on the business end of the lure. High in the water near the surface has not changed much, but when I fish a deep hole, I am getting some major hits and some decent hookups.
To see what the lure was doing, I went to the local outdoor pool after it closed and the lights went out and checked it out.... they lightly glow... like little eyes in the dark... it was kind of weird looking because I could hear the lure and locate it by the glow. What was really weird about it is it had no real color looking up at it. (and before you ask, yes the hook was removed)
So, any ideas on the next experiment with the optical fibers???:think:
 
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Kelkay

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Can you provide a link to the optical fibers you speak of? I use something similar to krystal flash, but much thinner. It may be what you are talking about. But then again maybe I am wrong. I would like to see exactly what you mean, before saying anything about it.
 
B

Born2Fish55

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Can you provide a link to the optical fibers you speak of? I use something similar to krystal flash, but much thinner. It may be what you are talking about. But then again maybe I am wrong. I would like to see exactly what you mean, before saying anything about it.

What I am using is light transmission optical fiber that is used in military grade optics... purchased from Lumenyte International. Since the company I work for deals with them and we buy product from them, they provided multiple samples for me to play with when I spoke to them one time.
If you go to their website, you can view the product and read a little on it.

I've used this, electronic cable/wire lacing and micro wires (silver, copper, platinum and gold) to tie scuds and other flies. It's kind of cool to see what you can play with.
 
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Kelkay

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I looked it up, but cannot really tell how it can be used differently with flies than regular flash. As far as spinners, you could use it mixed with your dressing on your tail. I do not know how it would look tied on as the dressing by itself. You could try it and see what you think.
 
B

Born2Fish55

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I looked it up, but cannot really tell how it can be used differently with flies than regular flash. As far as spinners, you could use it mixed with your dressing on your tail. I do not know how it would look tied on as the dressing by itself. You could try it and see what you think.

The fiber picks up existing light and 'transmits' it to the bitter ends. while the main lay is just a color, the ends of each string transmit a little beam of light (like a mini flashlight). when you see it from behind, it looks like little LED's (dots) of color.
I use Krystal flash on many of my flies and jigs, also mix with my bucktail at times on some of my spinners.
If I get the chance, I will see if I can get a couple of decent pix of the lighted lure (from behind, it is kind of creepy) underwater.
Have you ever tried 'Steelhead Stalkers' UV yarn... just bought some so I will play with it now as well.
 
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Kelkay

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No I haven't, but I will look it up. I would like to see photos of the product you have, sounds good.
 
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GMR

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Aloha
Just succesfully Silver plated my own Blades!! so much fun lol.
Ill do some other parts tomorro..
I tried to take a picture but my cell phone doesn't like them.
Ill try again with better camera later.
 
C

crawdad1234

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Have you used Powder Paint? How do you Silver plate the blades??
 
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