Advice for newbie : inflatable boat & trolling motor?

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NewbieNewbieNewbie

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Hi to all the experienced, respected members

I was hoping to ask you for some advice as a newbie.

I bought this Seahawke 3 inflatable boat, and then saw the

Jarvis Walker Venom 54P Trolling Motor

I noted it can be used in both salt water and fresh water,

Now this is a small boat and can take a weight of 660 pounds, but do you think this motor will be strong enough to sail along the coast in the sea. Most naturally not deep in the ocean, but just along the coast line/shore OR is it too weak or just too dangerous?

May I ask if you think this boat needs an anchor?

OR do you think an outboard motor is better for the sea, but probably more expensive?

What sort of speed do you think one will get in fresh water?

Thank you to everyone

Regards

James
 
rogerdodger

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that is not a boat that I would consider taking on the ocean OFF the coast of Oregon. cheers, roger

FYI- to use any boat anywhere in Oregon (or the ocean OFF Oregon) with a motor (electric or gas) requires hull ID numbers and registration.
(I personally don't think boats/kayaks/pontoons/canoes/driftboats with only an electric trolling motor should be required to register but that's the law we are stuck with for now).
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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in answer to you question I am going to strongly agree with rodgerdoger on the engine and the boat. I have a
Duckworth alum hull 18 ft Navigator with two engines, 90 main and 8 for a come home engine and I don't like taking it out in the ocean. However I have and when I am in the bottom of the trough and cannot see the ocean above my boat top I head in. I did twenty in the Navy and have been in some rough seas, have been on Z birds with a 20 hp engine, and lots of small craft and I don't like rough seas. I was even on a 35 foot torpedo retriever in the area of the Virgin Islands when my craft master surfed it. Rubber rafts are for the islands where it is warm and you can scuba dive, elec motors are for lakes or ponds. Keep this boat for freshwater. Remember one thing, if you get into trouble out in the ocean somebody(s) has/have to come n get you and maybe put there life(s) on the line to do that and then there is your family to consider. What is you wish to do? if that is known you can get better information on what you need.
 
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Hi rogerdodger and Diamond Lake Charlie


Thank you to you both for the advice.

I am not planning to go into the ocean.

Where I am is a lagoon and a river, that flows into the sea.

I was just wondering if a 54 pound thrust Jarvis watersnake trolling motor will be able to handle it if I happen to end up in the sea due to a strong wind blowing me there. I like to plan ahead if anything goes wrong, and therefore if not sufficiently powerful, then I would rather buy a stronger trolling motor (maybe 65 pounds because I want to stick with 12 volts, not 24 volts). Bear in mind the Seahawk 3 is a small inflatable boat, so I thought perhaps 54 pounds thrust will be strong for such a light boat???

Where I am we are lucky that we do not need a licence for a trolling motor.

So do you think If I get swept to the sea (near the shore, not deep sea), that 54 pounds of thrust is a reasonable strength when attached to a the Seahawk 3 which takes a maximum weight of 660 pounds even though I will be far less than this (perhaps 200 pounds).

Finally may I kindly ask one last question?

Do you or anyone else have any suggestions how to make the power supply as light as possible? Peerhaps 2 light batteries instead of one heavy battery? Whats sort of amp hours would you use?

Thank you to rogerdodger and Diamond Lake Charlie, and everyone else.

Regards

James


 
305to503fishermen

305to503fishermen

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@NewbieNewbieNewbie

As everyone else has state about not recommending it, I to am on board with that suggestion. I have owned the Mariner 4 and now a nice aluminum bottom inflatable boat. The seahawk 3 is not something you should be considering being by an outlet to the open ocean. I have a 36 lbs trolling motor for those boat and it struggles to go against the current in lakes.

Also as roger has stated that any vessel that has a motor must be registered. I have been stopped several time at the lakes asking me for that information.

I would highly recommend that you keep that for lakes and nothing else. They are not the thickest of plastics and have a real chance to pop.
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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newbie, just where are you. if in Oregon, the registration is aid in pest invaders in to foreign waters. If I am correct it does not mater if it has an engine or not and I do believe it does not mater if it is inflatable or not. Even those bigger solid boats with engines that run around looking fancy, like mine, pay that fee, it is attached to my regular registration. If your not sure check a current boating regs. Second item for you if you are in doubt or have a question on capabilities don't do it. Now to your question on lighter batteries. There are two types of batteries that I know of, basing this on working in a all battery store for three years, one the works properly and one that does not. At current and to the best of my knowledge there are two types of batteries and they are sealed and unsealed. In a totally sealed battery there is no way you can get in and those are pretty spendy and some of them are gel cells. They are great if you are going to race them and your rig may get turned up side down as they don't leak unless damaged. ALL other batteries you can open and get into the cells and yes that includes those that LOOK like they are sealed but they are not. This is a simple formula for you. One you will need to know you draw on your motor both high and low and then you will need to know the reserve time on your battery. Divide your draw into the reserve and you will get an approximate run time at high and low. On most batteries when you look into the cell or through the casing as some are semi opaque and you can see the liquid in them. You will see the liquid is just above the top of the plates and there is also a high spot in the cell and that will also be below the level in the vent cap. When batteries are made they are filled to the top of high mark and then charged and the plates absorb the liquid but the company does not refill them. However using distilled water you can fill those cells to the high mark and recharge the battery which will give you a little more running time. DO NOT use tap water, drinking water, or any pond water of any sort as there are chemicals in those waters that will shorten the use of you battery. After refilling you cells leave the caps loose and recharge you battery on a low amperage and prior to putting the caps back on give them a couple of shakes to make sure they are empty and be dang careful when you do that. Do not get any of that liquid on your clothes, face, skin or in your eyes as it is acid. see page 2
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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The reason you empty those caps is because they can and will pump the liquid from the cell to surrounding area of your battery and can give you problems with corrosion. When emptying the caps and you get that liquid on your pants and they are cotton like denim or blue jeans it will eat a hole in them, it can burn your skin and or give you some major problems with your eyes so be careful working around it. Setting time, a wet cell battery looses 1/2 of % per day just setting. So your battery will go from a full charge to dead flat in 200 days and then problems start. I recommend you charge you battery every 6 months on low amperage...then take off the charger unless it has a maintainer in it of 1 amp or less and is completely automatic.. I charge mine every 4 to 6 months and they last a good long time. I also keep a check on the liquid and use nothing but either distilled water to top it off with.When finished clean the top of your battery. There is a bunch more but I am tired of typing..My last thing for you is to carry a pair of oars and a life jacket for all.
 
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NewbieNewbieNewbie

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Hi rogerdodger and Diamond Lake Charlie


Thank you to you both for the advice.

I am not planning to go into the ocean.

Where I am is a lagoon and a river, that flows into the sea.

I was just wondering if a 54 pound thrust Jarvis watersnake trolling motor will be able to handle it if I happen to end up in the sea due to a strong wind blowing me there. I like to plan ahead if anything goes wrong, and therefore if not sufficiently powerful, then I would rather buy a stronger trolling motor (maybe 65 pounds because I want to stick with 12 volts, not 24 volts). Bear in mind the Seahawk 3 is a small inflatable boat, so I thought perhaps 54 pounds thrust will be strong for such a light boat???

Where I am we are lucky that we do not need a licence for a trolling motor.

So do you think If I get swept to the sea (near the shore, not deep sea), that 54 pounds of thrust is a reasonable strength when attached to a the Seahawk 3 which takes a maximum weight of 660 pounds even though I will be far less than this (perhaps 200 pounds).

Finally may I kindly ask one last question?

Do you or anyone else have any suggestions how to make the power supply as light as possible? Peerhaps 2 light batteries instead of one heavy battery? Whats sort of amp hours would you use?

Thank you to rogerdodger and Diamond Lake Charlie, and everyone else.

Regards

James


 
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NewbieNewbieNewbie

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Hi rogerdodger and Diamond Lake Charlie and 305to503fishermen

Thank you to you all for the excellent advice you have given me. I have nothing, but praise for the kind, experienced people helping me with advice here (me being a total rookie).

Diamond Lake Charlie thank you for the intense and heavy typing you did to help a newbie.

But I just wanted to ask some advice as a man who knows nothing about boats.

I plan to buy a Sunelexe trolling motor 66IBS of thrust for my Seahawk 3 inflatable boat, but now I am just wondering (after thinking deeply about this), if anyone thinks this might be too powerful for this 3 person inflatable boat (it can take 660 pounds of weight in total with the mount and trolling motor).

If this trolling motor happens to be too powerful for it, then what could possibly happen???

Could the boat's nose flip up into the air ?

Or is the answer simply to avoid full throttle and just use slow speeds? Or is there a serious risk here even at slow speeds?

I mean I am not a young man any more and I am not a reckless person to chase after speed anymore (my days of youth are "gone with the wind").

I would highly appreciate any advice from anyone with experience and knowledge on this matter (I also know nothing about this brand called Sunelexe, but its the one that is available at a very reasonable price tomorrow).

Thank you to everyone for your help.

Regards

James
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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For a simple reply, it is often better to have to much power than not enough. If you feel you are in danger or going to fast then slow down. On my boat I could put I think a 135 hp engine but I only have a 90. I am no spring chicken either, but I if I think I may hit some trouble I modify my run to remain safe. Have fun, enjoy n be safe.
 
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NewbieNewbieNewbie

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Thank you Diamond Lake Charlie (I thought there might be a limit in terms of how much an inflatable boat can take).
Thank you again
Regards
James
 
rogerdodger

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James-

In general all boats have a maximum motor size/weight rating, as for normal powerboats, larger outboard motors cost and weigh more than smaller ones and use more fuel, so it is very common to not use the maximum size the boat is rated for.

Batteries are a complex subject, I'm going to skip over standard lead-acid deep cycle types, they just are not a good option for deep cycle trolling motor applications, except perhaps for a temporary, test things out situation. they are heavy and do not tolerate deep cycle discharging well, even if they are supposedly designed for that purpose.

Li-Ion and AGM (absorbed glass mat) are the best options. Li-ion has the highest power density, highest cost, and lowest weight plus longest lasting: 5000 cycles (think phone/laptop/tablet batteries):

60amp-hr 20# $480 3amp-hr/# $8/amp-hr
80amp-hr 25# $680 3.2amp-hr/# $8.5/amp-hr

AGM is what most people use, heavier but much lower cost. these are sealed so they can't leak but are easy to damage if you don't charge them properly, always use a high quality charger specifically designed for AGM and recharge them ASAP. Most are expected to provide at least 350 deep cycles if you care for them. (I used the sale prices for these which made the cost per amp-hr jump around)

35amp-hr 26# $90 1.3amp-hr/# $2.6/amp-hr
40amp-hr 31# $130 1.3amp-hr/# $3.3/amp-hr
75amp-hr 57# $180 1.3amp-hr/# $2.4/amp-hr

I have used these Power-Sonic AGM for my kayak sonar batteries for 7 years now (5amp-hr and 7amp-hr sizes) and they have performed really well.

As for one large or multiple smaller batteries, the AGM are roughly the same amp-hr/#, so it really doesn't matter. The Li-ion gives you slightly higher amp-hr/# if you go larger but at an even higher cost per amp-hr. In this case, if I was looking for about 70amp-hr, a pair of those 35amp-hr AGMs is how I would go. I run a Minn-Kota 55# Riptide/CoPilot motor OFF the bow of our 16' powerboat and power it with a pair of 40amp-hr AGMs under the front bench seat plus a 30amp-hr in the stern that also starts the outboard.

cheers, roger
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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Thanks Roger, they have come out with a lot since I be in the business, mostly for Motor Cycles in Cars.
 
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NewbieNewbieNewbie

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Hi Roger and Diamond Lake Charlie

Thank you for this.

I agree that these lead acid deep cycle batteries can cause a back injury.

What do you think of building your own lithium battery using smaller 18650 batteries?

I know it is a lot lighter and probably cheaper to build it.

May I ask if you or anyone can recommend a cheap device to measure voltage and amps?

Or do you think it is better to buy a solar charge controller than can also perform the above functions? I have a portable solar system to charge devices, but do not want to damage the battery. I heard one must buy a solar charge controller.

Finally I also heard one must buy a circuit breaker for the trolling motor to protect it.

Thank you for all the excellent advice.

Best wishes

James
 

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