Want to learn to fly fish... help...

Green_Tackle
Hey guys. I've decided this will be the year I buy my first fly rig and give it a go. Problem is, I don't know where to start. My thinking was to pick the species and water and choose the gear from that. But now I'm having a hard time choosing.

Like most people, I've fished for trout since I was young. I started Steelhead/Salmon fishing last year and I love it. I'm usually on the Wilson or occasionally the Sandy. Should I jump right into fly fishing for Salmon/Steelhead or should I start with trout? I tend to get out more during the fall/winter than the spring/summer though I'm not sure why (I think I get to busy during the summer). Any recommended streams near portland especially well suited to fly fishing?
 
rainbowfisherman
I'd start with trout. Maybe start at a local pond then move to the rivers when they open. But because the rivers are closed now if you dont like the pond fishing i guess you would have to start with the steelhead
 
Irishrover
I'd start by getting a copy of the Curtis Creek Manifesto. It's a light hearted short, fly fishing manual. Only cost about $8.00. Then I'd start with trout fishing and see how you like it.
 
skunk
I'd start with trout also. I'd be willing to take you almost anytime after trout season opens. I started with a very inexpensive 8' rod and inexpensive reel. Double taper floating line and my own handmade tapered leaders. Don't get fooled into all the expensive stuff till you see if you like it. It's really much easier than gear fishing in my opinion, unless its for those wiley steelhead or salmon!!!
 
Oncorhynchus
Irishrover said:
I'd start by getting a copy of the Curtis Creek Manifesto. It's a light hearted short, fly fishing manual. Only cost about $8.00. Then I'd start with trout fishing and see how you like it.

Great book. I would start with fishing for gills its good fun easy to have 50+ fish days and great to help you get used to fighting fish with a fly rod and setting the hook and such.
 
Michael
Oncorhynchus said:
Great book. I would start with fishing for gills its good fun easy to have 50+ fish days and great to help you get used to fighting fish with a fly rod and setting the hook and such.

How do you fish for gils? I'm in the same boat as this guy, and would love to slay 20 to 30 hood rats before moving on to the serieous stuff.
 
Basser@Heart
I agree, start with trout, bass, or gills in a local pond. Steelhead are challanging. Get your casts down with fewer factors first and catch a couple "easy" fish first. Make sure you like it, It's a Blast! As far as how, just get a handful of flies, keep it simple. You need a couple wooly buggers, a couple of smaller nymphs (try prince nymphs and pheasant tails), and a few small poppers. If you need help learning the sport, PM me and I'll give you an afternoon run-down. Biggest key is patience, but get out there and have fun!
If you don't already have a set up start with this: 5wt 8'6" Temple Fork Outfitters rod ($99), a good reel (Very important!), and a basic floating line. Talk to the guys at Wholesale Outdoors ("Sportsman's Warehouse") and they'll know how to set you up.
Good Luck man!
 
Basser@Heart
Michael said:
How do you fish for gils? I'm in the same boat as this guy, and would love to slay 20 to 30 hood rats before moving on to the serieous stuff.

"Gills" as in Bluegills are simple, when the water's warm they bite anything, small wooly buggers and nymphs retrieved with a slow strip, and small poppers given a pop...pause....pop-pop....pause...., The San Juan worm works great too as well as dryfly patterns at times.
 
steelhead_stalkers
Oncorhynchus said:
setting the hook and such.

Dont you know that you never set the hook, just recast when you have a bite. :lol: Thats what my uncle would always tell me when I was younger. Dont set the hook just re-cast. ;)
 
Michael
Oh man, I am dying to try fly fishing. I don't have a rod or reel. In fact I've never even held one in my hand. But I HAVE watched a bunch of YouTube videos and now I'm excited.

I do have a couple questions though: I'm watching these guys talk about spotting a fish in the water and casting to it. So my question is... do you have to see the fish first, and then cast to it? Or do you just find a suspicious looking pool in the river and cast to that spot hoping that there are fish there? My guess is that you do both. But any and all commentary is very much appreciated. Also, is there a rule about fishing in murkey waters?
 
Alaskan Assassin
I have a little different philosophy for getting started. Rather than getting something cheap that you will likely outgrow in a year or two get some mid range equipment with a lifetime warranty that you will enjoy for years to come. Once you start catching fish on the fly I guarantee you'll be hooked so why not just get some gear that'll last. If you want some good advice go to a local fly shop NOT Sportsman's Warehouse or another big box store.
 
Alaskan Assassin
Michael,
Your'e right about both sight fishing and just picking good looking water depending on the situation both work. As far as murky water goes you can compensate by using brighter or bigger flies especially if your targetting steelhead or salmon. Having done very little trout fishing in Oregon I'm unsure if the strategy of adding some color and size works for trout down here as it does in Alaska.
 
Basser@Heart
I fully agree with Alaskan on the mid-range gear which is why I suggested that set up. I also think you should support your local fly shops as much as you can. Don't know if you'll find TFO at some of the smaller shops, some will, some won't, I know sportsmans happens too and its a rod I truly believe you won't outgrow. They come with a full replacement lifetime warranty as well! Either way, good luck!
 
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