Trout flies for steelhead

DeadDrift

New member
I had a regs question for the Clackamas that I can't seem to find a solid answer to.

Is it legal to fish trout bugs for steelhead this time of year on the Clack? I come from CA originally and I've had a lot of success fishing regular old trout bugs underneath standard steelhead attractors when I nymph for steel down there. It's a solid tactic that I know works. Case in point, yesterday I landed a hatchery hen on the last fly in my three fly setup: an egg, a Crazy Charlie, and a mayfly nymph. She took the mayfly.

That being said, I know trout season is closed on the Clack, and was wondering if DFW could potentially ticket me for having trout flies tied on. I've received conflicting answers to this question. A buddy of mine who fishes the Clack and Sandy regularly said its not problem, but an employee at Sportsmen's Warehouse said that it's a path to a quick ticket, as DFW could construe that as targeting trout.

Let me know what you guys think/an experience you have with this.

Thanks in advance.

(P.S. First timer poster here, been lurking for a while but wanted to jump in.)

EDIT: Third time ever fishing the Clack, AND she was my first ever PNW steelhead, super psyched about that!
 

EOBOY

Well-known member
way above my knowledge level. Welcome to OFF! I have never Fly fished for steel, but hope to start this year.

EOBOY
 

Lurker

Member
I can't imagine it being any different than a trout bead..

I think between us, we could find a satisfying answer in the near-trusty regs book.
 

rogerdodger

Moderator
Most Featured
I cannot see you having a problem, obviously you would not be in possession of any retained any trout, so I can't see how you could get ticketed for size/style of fly. It would be like spinner size, would there be like a cut-off size where above that was targeting steelhead but below that is targeting trout?

I am just an ODFW Angling Instructor (education, not enforcement...:thumb:), but in my opinion you are fine. cheers, roger
 

Lurker

Member
Artificial Fly:
A fly is a hook, dressed with conventional fly tying materials. The affixed materials may be natural or synthetic.Tied in conjunction with other materials, the following items may be part of the fly: wire (lead or other metal) usedfor weighting the fly, dumbbell eyes or beads (metal, glass or plastic). A fly is not a hook to which sinkers, moldedweights, spinners, spoons or similar attractors are attached.

Steelhead above Willamette Falls:
• Angling is restricted to artificial flies and lures in streams. Seeexceptions under Special Regulations where use of bait is allowed.

Clackamas River (Clackamas Co.); From mouth upstream to River MillDam:
• Open for adipose fin-clipped Chinook salmon, adipose fin-clipped coho salmon, andadipose fin-clipped steelhead all year.
• Combined daily bag limit of 3 adipose fin-clipped salmon or adipose fin-clipped steelheadper day.
• Use of bait allowed.
• No angling from a floating device between River Mill Dam and ODFW markers locatedapproximately 100 feet upstream of hatchery intake structure.

Anti-snagging Regulation:
Except when fishing with a buoyant lure (with no weights added to the line or lure), or trolling from a movingvessel or floating device, terminal fishing gear is restricted to an artificial fly, lure, or bait with one singlepointhook. Hooks must measure 3/4-inch or less from point to shank, and must be attached to or below thelure or bait. Weights may not be attached below or less than 18 inches above the lure or bait. See SpecialRegulations where anti-snagging regulation is in place.

I know using a dry as a strike indicator is popular, but this indicates it could be considered unlawful? I must be missing something in the regs book.. I certainly wouldn't tie on three flies, however, until someone chimes in.

Additionally, these regulations for your specific fishing location remain true for the 2016 season.
 
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rogerdodger

Moderator
Most Featured
Artificial Fly:
A fly is a hook, dressed with conventional fly tying materials. The affixed materials may be natural or synthetic.Tied in conjunction with other materials, the following items may be part of the fly: wire (lead or other metal) usedfor weighting the fly, dumbbell eyes or beads (metal, glass or plastic). A fly is not a hook to which sinkers, moldedweights, spinners, spoons or similar attractors are attached.

Steelhead above Willamette Falls:
• Angling is restricted to artificial flies and lures in streams. Seeexceptions under Special Regulations where use of bait is allowed.

Clackamas River (Clackamas Co.); From mouth upstream to River MillDam:
• Open for adipose fin-clipped Chinook salmon, adipose fin-clipped coho salmon, andadipose fin-clipped steelhead all year.
• Combined daily bag limit of 3 adipose fin-clipped salmon or adipose fin-clipped steelheadper day.
• Use of bait allowed.
• No angling from a floating device between River Mill Dam and ODFW markers locatedapproximately 100 feet upstream of hatchery intake structure.

Anti-snagging Regulation:
Except when fishing with a buoyant lure (with no weights added to the line or lure), or trolling from a movingvessel or floating device, terminal fishing gear is restricted to an artificial fly, lure, or bait with one singlepointhook. Hooks must measure 3/4-inch or less from point to shank, and must be attached to or below thelure or bait. Weights may not be attached below or less than 18 inches above the lure or bait. See SpecialRegulations where anti-snagging regulation is in place.

I know using a dry as a strike indicator is popular, but this indicates it could be considered unlawful? I must be missing something in the regs book.. I certainly wouldn't tie on three flies, however, until someone chimes in.

Additionally, these regulations for your specific fishing location remain true for the 2016 season.

just to clarify, the special Anti-Snagging regulations are not applied anywhere on the Clackamas River...cheers, roger

note: they are applied on a tributary, Eagle Creek!
 
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Lurker

Member
just to clarify, the special Anti-Snagging regulations are not applied anywhere on the Clackamas River...cheers, roger

Is there a limit to how many flies or nymphs one can tie onto their line? I mean, I have a ton of time to hunt through my regs book, but a quick answer would be appreciative!

Thanks for all your super informative and helpful posts / responses, by the way!
 

rogerdodger

Moderator
Most Featured
Is there a limit to how many flies or nymphs one can tie onto their line? I mean, I have a ton of time to hunt through my regs book, but a quick answer would be appreciative!

Thanks for all your super informative and helpful posts / responses, by the way!

it is at top of page 13 in the new regs:

No more than three hooks may be used when
angling, except herring jigs may be used for
marine food fish species (see page 15).
• A double or treble point hook is classified as
one hook.
• When angling with two rods (where
allowed and with a Two-Rod Validation),
the general hook rule applies to each rod.
 

Lurker

Member
it is at top of page 13 in the new regs:

No more than three hooks may be used when
angling, except herring jigs may be used for
marine food fish species (see page 15).
• A double or treble point hook is classified as
one hook.
• When angling with two rods (where
allowed and with a Two-Rod Validation),
the general hook rule applies to each rod.

The Anti Snagging Restriction is listed under the General Statewide Regulations (Page 12) and specifically says "See regulation exceptions for where anti-snagging gear restrictions are in place."

Would this be streams that enforce bobber only fishing? I can't seem to find neither an example, nor the "Regulation Exceptions" page. Some of the popular rivers I've noticed that (previously) had the bobber only enforcement seem to have lifted the requirement. Is this what the book is referring to?

Sorry to derail this thread. It appears the OP should be completely fine fishing the Clack with his setup.
 

Modest_Man

Well-known member
If you're using a seven or eight weight rod with a heavier leader and tippet it won't be an issue. If you're using a three or four weight with 5x tippet though...

Troopers aren't stupid. Pretty obvious to check the gear and determine what the target is.
 

rogerdodger

Moderator
Most Featured
The Anti Snagging Restriction is listed under the General Statewide Regulations (Page 12) and specifically says "See regulation exceptions for where anti-snagging gear restrictions are in place."

Would this be streams that enforce bobber only fishing? I can't seem to find neither an example, nor the "Regulation Exceptions" page. Some of the popular rivers I've noticed that (previously) had the bobber only enforcement seem to have lifted the requirement. Is this what the book is referring to?

Sorry to derail this thread. It appears the OP should be completely fine fishing the Clack with his setup.

the "Regulation Exceptions" are what you find now for specific locations in each zone. Prior to 2016, they were called "Special Regulations".

just check the exact location to see whether any special rules, like the Anti-Snagging or Salmon/Steelhead Bobber rules would apply.
 

Lurker

Member
the "Regulation Exceptions" are what you find now for specific locations in each zone. Prior to 2016, they were called "Special Regulations".

just check the exact location to see whether any special rules, like the Anti-Snagging or Salmon/Steelhead Bobber rules would apply.

Perfect information! Greatly appreciated!
 
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