Took my spinners out for a test run

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Kelkay

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Well I took my spinners out for a test run. A friend of mine had me scared that my spinners wouldn't spin. He said he started making his own a long time ago, but they wouldn't spin, so he gave up on it. I thought oh no, I sure don't want that to happen to me. Especially after I invested some money on materials for the stuff. I took my little collection of untried spinners on Sunday afternoon. Most of the spinners did great. A few did not spin. I think I know how to fix that, but if not I will just break them down and take the parts off of them, and use them for another spinner. The fish weren't biting good that day, but I did manage a catfish, and another fish that I lost...didn't realize I had him hooked, or I would of set the hook on him. Lost him at the bank. Both fish were on the same spinner, so I may have a good one out of the bunch. The spinners that did spin though were awesome. They did much better I thought than store bought spinners on average. They spun effortlessly. I was overall well pleased with them. I just sent off for the books recommended here on spinner making, and I hope that helps me see what I may of done wrong on the ones I had that failed the test. Anyway, it was so fun to try them out, and see how they behaved in the water. They sure beat a Rooster Tail straight out of the package, or I thought so anyway. Thanks for tips and help on here, I am sure that contributed to my success.
 
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ninja2010

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what kinda spinners? seems like they do work - at least to the fish...

post some pix... and i'm sure you'll get more constructive input...
 
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ninja2010

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thanks for the link... i checked them all out - nice looking bunch of spinners, i must say.

here's my 2 cents... based on what i've seen, the ones that didn't do so good have 2 things in common...

1) the balance is off - looks like they're top heavy, with insufficient weight behind the blades to keep the shaft stable as the spinner gets pulled through the water, so the clevis & blade won't spin smoothly. (the ones that are more weighted behind the blade spins well.)

2) there's too much obstruction in front of the blade that disperses the water - so instead of pushing the blade and thus making it spin, the water is being pushed away from the blade by the larger beads and whatnot in front of the blade - and that reduces the force of the water needed to spin the blade.

hope this makes sense...

and you do make nice spinners.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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Yep. Agreed. Top heavy, with the bead diffusing the water and not hitting your blade.

If you haven't sent for it already, you need a copy of "Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon and Trout" by Oregonian Jed Davis. You will learn a LOT and you will learn to simplify. You're spinners look pretty. But, flashy isn't necessarily the best. You will be surprised how many fish you will catch on an all black spinner (black blade, black body, and even black tubing on the hook shank).

You're OFF to a great start. Keep going!
 
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Kelkay

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Thanks for the constructive criticism. I looked back at the photos, and I see what you mean. I did order the books mentioned here, Jed's book, and Spinner Magic both.
 
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FishFinger

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Your making head way. IMHO you can do away with the bling above the clevis, make sure you have a bearing bead below the clevis and nothing above it. While not guaranteed, chances are it will effect the blades performance.

Taking it to another level....

Blade -- Ounce --- Grains
#2 -- .12 to .17 / 52.5 to 74.4
#3 -- .22 to .27 / 96.3 to 118.1
#4 -- .32 to .37 / 140.0 to 161.8
#5 -- .42 to .47 / 183.8 to 205.6
#6 -- .62 to .67 / 271.2 to 293.1


This is the "basic" benchmark of spinner weight to "drive" the given blade size. this weight includes all components I.E. the finished spinner.
 
K

Kelkay

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Thank you for looking at the spinners, and giving your comments. I do have a metal bead on top, and below all clevis'. I feel kind of out of my element because I have no idea what grains mean.
 
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FishFinger

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Thank you for looking at the spinners, and giving your comments. I do have a metal bead on top, and below all clevis'. I feel kind of out of my element because I have no idea what grains mean.

LOL no worries, it takes a bit to wrap ones nugget around the applied "theory" gig..

Lets see if I can be more helpful.

The grain thing.

In order to build spinners to these blade to weight ratios, as I was first instructed; I had to have a way to actually weigh them. The "cheapest" scale at the time was a reloading scale. Because the weight of gun power is measured in grains, I had to make the conversion. Hence, grains.

Beads, bearings and embellishments above the clevis probably do more to encumber the spinners action than to improve it. As well it might be a temptation for a strike well away from the hook.

The notion of a spinner blade whacking a fishes mug before it takes the hook, is a consideration on every proto type I twist up. Basic rule being, never allow the end of the blade to fall below the bottom of the lower loop, where the hook is connected. Blades can be higher up the body, but never lower than that bottom loop.

This is a theory I fully believe has merit! Depending on how you build your spinner, top down or bottom up, the first step avails you the opportunity to tune your spinner. Say your building top down as Allen did. Once your first loop is formed, hold it at eye level and roll the shaft between your thumb and fore finger. Check out the loop to verify it's round and sits straight on top of the wire; like a lolli-pop. when turning it quickly is pretty easy to see if it spins true. It's only wire a small adjustment can set a crooked loop straight.

If you build as I like to, bottom up, you can tune the hook loop the same way as mentioned above, except the hook will hang while you spin the wire. A funky loop will throw the hook out by centrifugal force. A tuned loop will hold the hook directly in line with the wire.

This brings me to......... The extra 1" tag wire. If you don't crowd the clevis, you can get in and put a spin on the wire and verify the tuning of your final loop, be it the top or bottom.

This is why I don't like blue foxes. if you look at the top loop it's D shaped, not a good sign...... with no way to "tune" it or verify to my satisfaction level, it's highly suspect to, more often than not, be out of tune.

Does it work? Is it really important? I think so in that it's giving me a benchmark to work from. I twisted many gems that were epic FAILS, not so much any more.

On the other hand I've seen salmon destroy spinners, bent beyond belief and had friends claim them to be "lucky spinners". Tuning at that point no longer a consideration, yet fish still hit them. Go figure!


Your spinners concepts are creative, keep running with it
 
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R

rickman

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Nice looking spinners Kelkay.

As others have pointed out, you don't need a bead above the clevis. Waste of a bead and it will impede the water flow over the blade and create more friction for the clevis. I'm not sure but from your pics some of the spinners look like the blades are too small, i.e., they don't reach to at least the bottom of the lure body. From what I've read the blade needs to extend to the bottom of the lure body and some say to the bottom eye. I have tried various blade styles and I only use the sonic/inline blades or the french blades. I tried out all of my inlines earlier this week and each and every one of them worked perfectly. The blades started instantly when I started the retrieve without having to jerk the lure and they turned with very low retrieve speeds. So, I'm pretty confident that I have the blade thing down. Also, the one that did catch the fish, and it was only one, was a black hammered french blade, 1/12oz. black body with brass beads and a dressed hook. But that was on that day. Next time it may be a different color/body style. Fish are finicky;b
 
troutdude

troutdude

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What? Fish are finicky? No way! Who would've thunk it? LOL

I'd like to address one of your comments above: "and they turned with very low retrieve speeds".

That is EXACTLY what you want for Salmon fishing. If you don't fish slow n' low (deep), you won't get to them. And Jed's theory is that if you aren't losing several spinners per trip, you're not getting into the zone.

I don't think that slow n' low matters as much for steelie's and trout. But, it's worth making sure your blades will spin at a low retrieve speed anyway. Then, you've got one more trick you can switch to when needed for them finicky fins out there.
 
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Kelkay

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Thanks again for the comments. I use a preformed wire, and start with clevis, and work my way down adding beads, body, and last the hook. Then I twist the wire to keep the hook on. I just now got the two books in I ordered on the spinners. I am excited, cannot wait to read them.
 
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rickman

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I use the open end pre-formed wires for my inlines. I start from the bottom and work my way up. I agree with some of the previous posts that the gaudier looking lures are to catch fishermen not fish (I've bit multiple times). I've made some spinners that my daughters and friends think would make nice looking jewelry or earrings! Not sure how to take that compliment:D

I do think that simple gold, silver, black or a combination of those together will probably catch more fish than the brightly colored ones though, but that's just me. I'm still on the fence on the dressed hooks though. It seems that the dressed hooks perform a little better than the plain ones. Need to test that idea more thoroughly though.
 
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Kelkay

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Well after reading the part on spinner making, I am getting ideas. I guess I need to try doing my spinners from the bottom up, and putting a split ring on for the hook. I read where they don't suggest snap swivels, but I much prefer them. The book also talked about using a black swivel. I usually use brasss snap swivels, but the day I tested, I was using a small black snap swivel.
 
R

rickman

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You don't need "snap" swivels. You could use just the small barrel swivels. Sometimes I put them on and sometimes not. Personal preference.
 
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ninja2010

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less is more when it comes to spinners... hook, body, blade, clevis, one bead, and a piece of wire to string them all together.
 
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Kelkay

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For size 3 and up either a swivel, or a snap swivel I think is best. I am not the best knot tyer, nor the fastest. I do love to whip one spinner on after another, so the snap swivel makes things so much quicker. I think I would lose more fish by the slower tying on without a snap swivel, than I would by the rejection of fish by a snap swivel. But then again, my primary target is bass, and bass are not nearly as picky as salmon, steelhead, or trout. The small spinners that I have for trout you do not need a spinner with. I have caught many trout with a small snap swivel though. Most of the time if I am trout fishing I fly fish though. I may make up a couple of spinners with a barrel attached, with no snap swivel used, and see if there is a difference. As always thank you for your opinions. I do think about them, and sometimes I change my mind, especially if a majority of people feel adament about an issue.
 
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Kelkay

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I have never seen anything like that. Do you put a swivel on the eye of the lure, then attach the fast snap? How is that really different than adding just a snap swivel I wonder? I like reviews, and other people's experiences before I do some steps on lure or fly making....I learn from their experiences, and it helps me to tweak what I want, and in a faster, more accurate way. Before I buy certain things also, I ask what other's think, and read reviews. I have found in the long run, I am much happier that way. Sorry for so many questions, but that is how I learn.
 
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rickman

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These are what I use when I don't want to keep cutting and re-tying my line between inline spinner changes. These are quite small and do not adversely affect the lure action in my experience. I have been using these for years and have had zero failures. They are not made for large lures. Directly tie them to the eye and "clip" your inline spinner to it in the top eye and start slinging them.
 

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