Temporary changes to wild chinook harvesting in SW zone

troutdude

troutdude

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June 7, 2021

SALEM, Ore. — ODFW is enacting temporary restrictions on coastal wild adult Chinook salmon harvest in the Southwest Zone due to low forecasted returns.

Chinook salmon returns have been below average the past few years associated with very poor ocean conditions beginning in 2014. Although the ocean has improved recently and overall returns may be somewhat higher, the forecasted returns in Southwest Zone coastal rivers remain low in 2021.

The temporary changes to wild Chinook salmon harvest are consistent with existing ODFW management plans. These plans specify increases or decreases to harvest levels in response to changing stock status for wild Chinook salmon in various rivers.
There are no changes to permanent regulations for coastal streams in the Northwest Zone or for the Rogue River Basin.

Except for the Coquille Basin, or unless otherwise indicated, restrictions only apply to harvest of adult wild Chinook salmon, and anglers may harvest adult hatchery salmon until the normal daily bag limit of two fish has been met (see 2021 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations).
The daily limit for jack Chinook salmon (hatchery or wild) remains five fish per day and does not count towards the adult daily limit. However, once the adult daily limit is harvested, anglers may not continue to fish for jack salmon.

Recent Chinook salmon returns to the Coquille River have been particularly low.

Predation by smallmouth and striped bass is believed to be a significant contributor to the depressed status of fall Chinook salmon in the Coquille River in addition to past poor ocean conditions. ODFW is continuing efforts to address increasing populations of introduced smallmouth and striped bass in this river system (information: https://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2021/05_May/052121.asp). However, in an effort to maximize spawner abundance, this basin will be closed to angling for salmon (both wild and fin-marked hatchery fish) from July 1 through December 31.

Although not experiencing similar declines as the Coquille River, there will also be restrictions to wild fall Chinook salmon fisheries in the Umpqua River, Coos River, Floras Creek/New River, Sixes River, Elk River, Hunter Creek, Pistol River, Chetco River and Winchuck River. Restrictions on rivers south of the Coquille are also meant to reduce harvest on older age fish which are still in conservation status.
See regulation details at this link: https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/southwest-zone

Biologists observed some signs of improvement in total return numbers and improving ocean conditions in 2020. In general, streams in the Northwest Zone appear to have rebounded from the recent downturn. Permanent rules will be in effect for these systems.

These regulation changes are in response to stock status in particular rivers and additional measures may be required in response to drought effects. Anglers are encouraged to check the regulations update page before each fishing trip, in case of any changes.
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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I would double check your rules, The Umpqua is only allowed One Wild Chinook per day.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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@Diamond Lake Charlie what I posted above was directly from and ODFW press release. Word for word.

P.S. I can find nothing to substantiate your statement under SW Zone regs, or under the exceptions for the Umpqua.
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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Not finding fault and please do not take it that way, my point was to double check things. If you will go to the weekly fishing report for the southwest area you will find that under the Umpqua River it is listed for only one native king and only 5 for the season. My point is to ALWAYS check for the changes that are currently listed. I happen to know about it and I have known for a few weeks now as I watch and fish the Umpqua, and for two other reasons, the first being I get updates on my computer from ODFW n second I get the weekly fishing report which also has the current special regulations and if I am aware of things but no sure I always check them. If you do not have these options you can do as I often do and call the local office. The official Printed synopsis is current as to the date it was printed but you and I both know there are changes made because of such things as ocean conditions, drought, illegal fish that have been planted, such as the bass in the Coquille and the Umpqua which are playing havoc with the salmon smolt and many other things. One other thing, apparently the information you had was not completely accurate or else we would not be having this discussion. My apologies if you have taken offense. DLC
 
jamisonace

jamisonace

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It's bad down here, especially the Coquille. Those damn bass. I wish they would shock the whole system and turn every bass they get into fertilizer. Same on all SW Oregon rivers with bass.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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@Diamond Lake Charlie no offense taken whatsoever. And I hope likewise. I was merely sharing what I could find.

Thanks to you and to @jamisonace for correcting me. I had not thought about looking at that online stuff. I'm old and never think about any source other than the printed reg book.
 
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Diamond Lake Charlie

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Hey troutdude I turned 73 the other day, so what do you consider old.. Don't feel bad when I was a young squirt I wanted to be either a game bio or a fish bio. Then when I went to college in my late 30's, early 40's I studied 6 terms of law so I kind of have a one up on you.
 
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