Technical question about using spinners:

C

chrishophoto

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I am not a big fan of baits, as in I just don't really want to mess with the stinky stuff, and my ideal is to hook the bad babies up with hardware. That said, I am still learning, and have yet to land a steelhead yet. Hopefully this will change soon.

My Question: I have noticed that a lot of people here that use spinners for steelheads are using #3 or #4 size spinners to get them, but to me these sizes seem too light to cast effectively with anything but an ultralight rod, and getting the these light weight lures down to the bottom of a river also seems challenging. Are you folks using weights on the line as well to aid both of these problems, or are you using the spinners by themselves?

Just curious, -Chris
 
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M

metalmania

I tie my own, and there plenty heavy enough to cast to the opposite bank on most of the water I fish. I use mainly 4's and sometimes 5's for summers right now. 1/3oz for 4's and 1/2oz for 5's. I'd highly suggest tying your own if you really want to get into spinner fishing. It's cheaper then store bought and usually way more effective.
 
C

chrishophoto

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I tie my own, and there plenty heavy enough to cast to the opposite bank on most of the water I fish. I use mainly 4's and sometimes 5's for summers right now. 1/3oz for 4's and 1/2oz for 5's. I'd highly suggest tying your own if you really want to get into spinner fishing. It's cheaper then store bought and usually way more effective.

What rod are you pairing these up with?
 
H

halibuthitman

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rod line and reel should have little effect on your ability to get your spinners down to where the steel are.... you havent caught a fish yet, so your not getting down. are you leading your fishing spot by casting upstream and letting your hardware sink all the way to the bottom before retrieving? you should be losing a spinner, or catching a fish every 2.5-3 hrs. switch the treble hook for a siwash hook and you will lose less hardware, but miss more strikes, but the fish you hook will be very well hooked.... sometimes too well.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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I agree w/ MetalMania on all counts.

And to learn how to make your own spinners and use them correctly...you need the Spin Fisherman's Bible. The title is Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon, and Trout, by Jed Davis. Frank Amato Publisher. You can get copy any number of ways, but here it is on Amazon:

Amazon.com: Spinner Fishing for Steelhead, Salmon and Trout (9780936608402): Jed Davis: Books.

The first time I followed Jed's advice, I hooked into 4 monster 'nooks in one day! Plus, the spinners were made by myself and based on Jed's designs. Jed is well known for his book and methods. You won't be disappointed.

I have been buying my components (in person) from Don Green at the Fishermans Shack, for a couple of decades. Not only does Don carry Jed's book--but all of the components to make your own. His shop is between Corvallis and Monmouth on Hwy. 99W. Here is his link:

Top Sellers

Good luck.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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Thanks! I just placed my order for this book!

You're very welcome. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do. I refer to it a LOT, and have had my copy for many years. BTW, Jed lives in Oregon (somewhere around Eugene, if memory serves me). He mostly fishes the Mac and the S. Santiam. So, what you will learn applies to our area.
 
Badfish

Badfish

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I use primarily #3 R&B spinners. I use a Loomis 9' medium light action, 1083S. I like using P-Line CX 10# line, which allows you to cast a mile.

R&B spinners are heavier than store bought, but if you don't have a choice, buy #3 silver and copper Mepps Aglias.

I'm glad you ordered Jed's book. It's got a ton of good information. Good luck.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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I forgot to mention. In the really low water conditions in the summer; I sometimes use a #2 or even a # 1 size spinner. I don't want to spook the fish, by making a bigger splash with a larger lure.

And if you fish the South Santiam, there is a green tint in the water. So, Jed like a green and black spinner for that river.

You will also be surprised at how many fish you will catch, with an all black spinner! (i.e. black body, black blade, black tape, etc).
 
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J

Johnny Southpaw

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Like Kodiak said-some water is better suited for hardware (i.e. not too deep) and you shouldn't be trying to reel your spinner in really fast-in fact you should be trying to reel as slow as possible while still having the blade spin. Another good point someone made: if you're not loosing spinners on the bottom every so often you aren't fishing in the ZONE! There's a steep learning curve, but once you get it you won't be loosing spinners all that often (and as you progress you will learn there are techniques to getting a spinner un-snagged that you should try before just snapping your line). My first year throwing spinners yielded a big fat SKUNK! My second season yielded much better results. Spinners can be very effective if fished properly, in the right water. Keep reading Jed's book-it is the spinner Bible! Good luck, and, perseverance does pay!
 
R

rippin fish lips

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i like to use a #3 spinner, mainly (bluefox) i caught my first nooky with the all silver number 3 spinner at hayden bridge. u can also use those same methods while fishing spoons, like thomas spoons! i have hooked 100's of trout using those methods with a 1/4 spoon. i have hooked about 5 steelhead with the spoon using that method, its kinda tricky tho :) 2 of them were at hayden and 2 doin the leaburg to greenwood float, and 1 doin the hendricks to bellinger float! :)
 
R

rippin fish lips

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Like Kodiak said-some water is better suited for hardware (i.e. not too deep) and you shouldn't be trying to reel your spinner in really fast-in fact you should be trying to reel as slow as possible while still having the blade spin. Another good point someone made: if you're not loosing spinners on the bottom every so often you aren't fishing in the ZONE! There's a steep learning curve, but once you get it you won't be loosing spinners all that often (and as you progress you will learn there are techniques to getting a spinner un-snagged that you should try before just snapping your line). My first year throwing spinners yielded a big fat SKUNK! My second season yielded much better results. Spinners can be very effective if fished properly, in the right water. Keep reading Jed's book-it is the spinner Bible! Good luck, and, perseverance does pay!

That is true! your first year of fishing spinners, u will lose a lot of em and u will get snagged up a lot, they are easy to unsnagged, my first year i was skunked to! but then my 2nd year of using em i hooked that first nook and steely!! just because u r getting snagged up dont give up on it! keep fishing them and u will learn!
 
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