Sea-run cutthroat?

frontierhistorian
Where's a good spot for SRCs just now, especially in Northwest region? Siletz is supposed to be good, but it seems pretty low just now as are most of the other coastal rivers. How far up to the SRCs go when conditions are good?
 
uintaangler
Sure wish somebody would be kind enough to answer this one :cool:
I'm new to the area and would really appreciate some intel on where to look for Sea Run Cutties in northwestern OR
 
frontierhistorian
uintaangler said:
Sure wish somebody would be kind enough to answer this one
Haha. Well, I would otherwise say Siletz, Trask, Wilson, Nehalem, but many of these are running at 3 feet or lower with optimum fishing depth at 6 feet or so (the Nestucca, closest to me, is optimum between and 5 and 7 feet, I think, but is 3 something. The ODFW report for the Trask, if I remember, says the sea runs are still in the tidal waters, waiting for the river to cool down. So the answer may be "nowhere."
 
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olshiftybiscuits
frontierhistorian said:
Haha. Well, I would otherwise say Siletz, Trask, Wilson, Nehalem, but many of these are running at 3 feet or lower with optimum fishing depth at 6 feet or so (the Nestucca, closest to me, is optimum between and 5 and 7 feet, I think, but is 3 something. The ODFW report for the Trask, if I remember, says the sea runs are still in the tidal waters, waiting for the river to cool down. So the answer may be "nowhere."
Those levels you’re referring to are ideal winter levels for steelhead and salmon fishing. You can fish for sea runs from the tidewater to headwaters the day trout season opens through the day it closes. Sea runs tend to move in larger numbers when it rains, but they don’t need rain to get upstream. Their incentive for migration is to be a few weeks ahead of the salmon so they’re not competing for space and resources. They are well distributed throughout all of the coastal rivers at this point and you’ll find them in any river that touches the ocean directly. All of the tillamook bay tribs are good options. The Alsea system is great. Even the Lower Clackamas still has an SRC run.

Conventional wisdom for finding sea runs is to look for soft, froggy water and strip reverse spiders or other small, bright streamers. This time of year, I find the sea runs to be in more traditional trout water and my favorite way to pursue them is with a big October Caddis dry skated across the surface.

As for where to go, anywhere. Just find public land on a coastal river and go fish it. Check your regs closely, a lot of coastal rivers are closed above a certain deadline or have closed tributaries or both.
 
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frontierhistorian
olshiftybiscuits said:
Those levels you’re referring to are ideal winter levels for steelhead and salmon fishing. You can fish for sea runs from the tidewater to headwaters the day trout season opens through the day it closes. Sea runs tend to move in larger numbers when it rains, but they don’t need rain to get upstream. Their incentive for migration is to be a few weeks ahead of the salmon so they’re not competing for space and resources. They are well distributed throughout all of the coastal rivers at this point and you’ll find them in any river that touches the ocean directly. All of the tillamook bay tribs are good options. The Alsea system is great. Even the Lower Clackamas still has an SRC run.

Conventional wisdom for finding sea runs is to look for soft, froggy water and strip reverse spiders or other small, bright streamers. This time of year, I find the sea runs to be in more traditional trout water and my favorite way to pursue them is with a big October Caddis dry skated across the surface.

As for where to go, anywhere. Just find public land on a coastal river and go fish it. Check your regs closely, a lot of coastal rivers are closed above a certain deadline or have closed tributaries or both.
Thanks for this!

My understanding of the levels was that at lower levels, the water warmed and trout feeding substantially decreases as the fish hunker down in the deepest water they can.
 
troutdude
olshiftybiscuits said:
Those levels you’re referring to are ideal winter levels for steelhead and salmon fishing. You can fish for sea runs from the tidewater to headwaters the day trout season opens through the day it closes. Sea runs tend to move in larger numbers when it rains, but they don’t need rain to get upstream. Their incentive for migration is to be a few weeks ahead of the salmon so they’re not competing for space and resources. They are well distributed throughout all of the coastal rivers at this point and you’ll find them in any river that touches the ocean directly. All of the tillamook bay tribs are good options. The Alsea system is great. Even the Lower Clackamas still has an SRC run.

Conventional wisdom for finding sea runs is to look for soft, froggy water and strip reverse spiders or other small, bright streamers. This time of year, I find the sea runs to be in more traditional trout water and my favorite way to pursue them is with a big October Caddis dry skated across the surface.

As for where to go, anywhere. Just find public land on a coastal river and go fish it. Check your regs closely, a lot of coastal rivers are closed above a certain deadline or have closed tributaries or both.
DING DING DING!!! Spot on!!!

Yes...they will look for the cooler water...although they don't need fast moving water like rainbows do.
 
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olshiftybiscuits
frontierhistorian said:
Thanks for this!

My understanding of the levels was that at lower levels, the water warmed and trout feeding substantially decreases as the fish hunker down in the deepest water they can.

That can certainly happen on hot days, and morning is definitely the best time to chase sea runs early season when it’s still warm. With the nights getting longer and the days cooler, that shouldn’t be an issue the rest is the season but I do always bring my water temp thermometer along. If the water hits 68 I call it quits.
 
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uintaangler
I'm getting ready for my first try ever for SRC's
My local fly shop suggested the Nehalem - - - do you agree or would you suggest a different river?
Thanks
 
olshiftybiscuits
uintaangler said:
I'm getting ready for my first try ever for SRC's
My local fly shop suggested the Nehalem - - - do you agree or would you suggest a different river?
Thanks

The Nehalem is great, just be sure you’re fishing below highway 26.
 
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Davpot
uintaangler said:
I'm getting ready for my first try ever for SRC's
My local fly shop suggested the Nehalem - - - do you agree or would you suggest a different river?
Thanks
Yes, I agree with Oldshifty! Some oldtimer lnce said: fish the shadows! Try a small crawdad pattern or Royal Coachman this time of year. It should only get better from here! Catch and Release will really help preserve this fishery! Good luck!
 
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troutdude
Yep. When I’m freshwater they gorge on spring-born crawdad fry.
 
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troutdude
When IN that is
 
frontierhistorian
olshiftybiscuits said:
below highway 26.
At hwy 103? The river crosses 26 there and way upstream.
 
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