Recognizing a strike

T

tdales

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Dec 26, 2009
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So I have a newb question. I went out today to further develop my skills of jigging with a bobber. I've noticed people describing their hits as, "My bobber went down, I flipped the bail, set the hook and that was that." So while I'm out there I notice my bobber goes down quite often, maybe once every 3 or 4 casts give or take a few. Everytime my bobber goes down isn't a strike right? Can the current just be taking me down? Or maybe I'm getting too much drag in my line? Or am I just missin serious fish? Thanks in advance.

Travis
 
N

ninja2010

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if your jig is too low, you might be clipping the bottom, which would cause your bobber to bob...

did you set the hook when the bobber goes down or wiggles abnormally during the drift?
 
A

autofisher

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When I'm bobber fishing, and it goes down, it's really hard to not take a swing. Hopefully after a few casts to the same spot or area, I'll have a better guess as to whether it's the current or a fish. A good fishing buddy of mine once told me, "jerks are free".
 
T

tdales

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Jerks are free. I like that lol. Yea I can't say that I set it everytime, but I did start to. Basically because why not? But had nothin' on the other end everytime. It could be I was hittin' bottom, but I was adjusting regularly.
 
A

autofisher

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Ok this might sound like a waste of time to some people, but it seems to help me when I'm not sure of the depth. I take my bobber, and put on a weight around the same size/weight as my jig or bait. I'll tie it on and adjust my bobber by bouncing the weight along the bottom until I adjust it to the right level. Does that make any sense?
 
N

ninja2010

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start short... and increase distance of bobber stop until you hit bottom. then lower the stop a foot or 2 and keep floating. when you move, readjust.

if you're fishing tailouts, stop your bobber before it gets to the shallower end, and let the jig swing up with the current or you're gonna get stuck.
 
N

ninja2010

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also, if you have too much weight for the bobber you're using, it won't stay above water when you drift into a chop... just another thought.
 
T

tdales

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Yea that makes perfect sense. Could save a lot of tackle that way, for a little extra effort.
 
T

tdales

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Yea ninja that's the approach I've been takin'
 
T

tdales

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Oh that's a good point! I might go with a larger bobber
 
N

ninja2010

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okay... another thing... hook sharpener... keep that point deadly and the fish will not know what happened.... the bobber down might just start giving you a bendo!
 
M

metalmania

a lot has been said already, but shorter leaders will help you find bottom quicker and you'll lose less gear. I never go above 24, and usually run around 18.
 
A

adambomb

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When it comes to recognizing a strike while bobber fishing, I can't say I have much experience landing fish but what I do know is that it isn't always a bobber down thing. I fished one day this last fall with Osmosis on the sandy and we got into a group of Chinooks, he landed 5 and I hooked up and lost one. We were using eggs under a bobber, and I was surprised how subtle the strike was. The surface of the water was glass smooth, and the bobber would just wiggle ever so slightly.
 
M

metalmania

When it comes to recognizing a strike while bobber fishing, I can't say I have much experience landing fish but what I do know is that it isn't always a bobber down thing. I fished one day this last fall with Osmosis on the sandy and we got into a group of Chinooks, he landed 5 and I hooked up and lost one. We were using eggs under a bobber, and I was surprised how subtle the strike was. The surface of the water was glass smooth, and the bobber would just wiggle ever so slightly.

Your right man, salmon takes seem to vary from a slight wiggle in your bobber to a solid bobber down. With steelhead I tend to get more solid takes and less of those wiggly bites.
 
Y

youngbuck307

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Your right man, salmon takes seem to vary from a slight wiggle in your bobber to a solid bobber down. With steelhead I tend to get more solid takes and less of those wiggly bites.

O so true on coho if my bobber does anything that dont look like it should be doing for the type of water im fishing or really anything side to side ill set the hook "WHEN IN DOUBT SET THE HOOK!!!" and on top of it with jigs you wont loss your bait like you do with eggs and that hookset lol.


When it comes to bobber downs. How big of bobber are you running? Normaly i run around a 3/4 but that depends on water really i like to make sure to have up to a 1oz with me and some times in low water 1/4oz and are you using inline waights if so dont forget you have up to a 1/4 normaly 1/8 oz more on your jig! other than that just make sure your at the right depth.
 
T

Teo

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a lot has been said already, but shorter leaders will help you find bottom quicker and you'll lose less gear. I never go above 24, and usually run around 18.

How do shorter leaders help in finding the bottom? I generally use about 30 inches and often have trouble finding the bottom, so what is it about having a shorter leader that makes it easier?

Thanks,
T
 
T

Teo

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When it comes to bobber downs. How big of bobber are you running? Normaly i run around a 3/4 but that depends on water really i like to make sure to have up to a 1oz with me and some times in low water 1/4oz and are you using inline waights if so dont forget you have up to a 1/4 normaly 1/8 oz more on your jig! other than that just make sure your at the right depth.

How is it that size matters:D? I assume that a smaller bobber is more sensitive so ideally you would want to use as small a bobber as you can get away with, true?, maybe not. Also, when a bobber is classified as 3/4 oz does this mean that it will float up to 3/4 oz. of weight? I've also noticed that many bobbers don't have a size rating printed on them, or on the package they came in. Some Beau Macs do and some don't. Pikers do, Thills not.

Thanks,
T
 
S

steelhead_stalkers

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I use as small of float as I can get away with. For small rivers I will use a 11g drennan or you can use a 3/8oz west coast float. For medium or larger rivers with decent flow you can use a 20g drennan or 1/2 or 3/4oz west coast float. Not sure how shorter leader will help you find bottom faster because your main line will be in the water as well if you have to fish very deep. Start shallow and work your way down. If you are getting take downs it could be hitting a big boulder or it could be trout. A lot of times trout will bite and not get hooked.
 

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