Please get me going

H

heythere

New member
Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
1
I have just moved to this state. i have never river fished before and since moving out here and asking around a bit for advice on getting started, i am realizing how different it is from lake fishing.

i live in the portland area and am looking to get into fishing steelhead, chinook, trout, and anything else that is new to me. what type of rod and reel should i get that is most universal in fishing steelhead and chinook (and trout?). do you only fly fish for trout? and do you only use a spinning reel for steelhead and chinook?

also- i did a little hiking at eagle creek. any advice on fishing there? do i just get down in there and start casting around or are there certain stretches of the river where there are fish/are not fish..? again- river fishing seems to be night and day from lake fishing.

thanks in advance
 
B

Bad Tuna

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Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
197
Location
Gilligans Island
Best thing would be to go fish with someone who has different types of equipment to see what fits you best. Pm me if you like, I'll take you up to Eagle creek and we can try it out. Also pick up a copy Of salmon trout steelheader to get some ideas.
 
Raincatcher

Raincatcher

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Apr 15, 2008
Messages
4,733
Location
Less than 50 feet from the Santiam River! :)
Welcome to the forum, it's the best around and the finest members to be found. I would take Bad Tuna's OFFer if I were you, it's a hard one to beat. You can also learn a ton of info,tips and techniques in the archives. Just select a heading and start reading. You will find the folks here are willing to share most anything they have learned or experienced. About the only thing most won't share is their favorite hole. That's something you just have to find on your own. The best teacher is time...the more time you spend on the water and learn the ways of the fish and the water you're fishing at, the better your experiences will become. Just don't go down to the water and think you're going to go home with dinner every night...you will spend a lot of dinners with peanut butter. There are dozens, if not hundreds of books on the subject as well that you can pick up at your local bookstore. The most important thing is to get out there and enjoy, and please remember to pack out what you pack in and maybe pick up a lil bit more. Enjoy!
 
F

fish4life

Active member
Joined
Oct 24, 2010
Messages
293
Location
molalla,or
It would be really hard to get one pole for all three species. If you wanted to get a rod for both salmon and steelhead I would get a 8'6" 8-17# line or a 10-20# line rod. And for trout I would get a rod 6-7' long rated to 8# or 10# line this pole could also work for other species such as bass or panfish. I would try to hook up with someone from the forum at least they could give you the basics and show you some productive water to fish. Dont give up sometimes you have to spend countless hours on the water but it is all worth it when you are holding your first salmon or steelhead.
 
G

GungasUncle

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
938
Location
Forest Grove, Oregon
AS has been said - you won't find one rod that will do it all - at least not one that's going to be much fun to fish with.

Chinook and steelhead are different fish - and we've got two different runs of each of those every year. Spring chinook and fall chinook, summer steelhead and winter steelhead. Spring chinook and winter steelhead are generally larger than their fall and summer counter parts. You could get a rod that does steelhead and fall chinook pretty well - but not perfect. 8'6" or longer medium power rod would do it - but if you want to bobber fish, a longer rod is a bit more advantageous.

For trout and panfish - I'd get an ultralight rod that's 7+ feet long, a small spinning reel and load it with 4lb line. You can fish trout, panfish, smallmouth, and some largemouth bass with this setup.

You could go heavier - and get a medium action rod rated for 6-10 lb line - but small trout and panfish aren't a lot of fun to catch with a heavier rod like that - at least for me. That's a great rod for bigger bass, bigger trout, and catfish though.

You can fish trout with bait, lures, or flies - just like any other fish. Most streams in Oregon have general regulations stating artificial lures and flies only - but there's plenty of them that allow bait also. There are a few waters in oregon that are fly only - but they are a minority. Spinners, spoons, jigs, and plugs will catch trout just as well as flies.

I would identify the fish or fishes you want to target the most - and start there with building your rod/tackle selection - then add to it as you get into fishing for other fish, or as cash allows. You can fish trout year round if you're willing to drive a little bit, or to hunt for the right spots. Same with just about any other fishing here.

Welcome to Oregon, and welcome to OFF.
 
M

metalfisher76

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
1,060
Location
pdx oregon
I have just moved to this state. i have never river fished before and since moving out here and asking around a bit for advice on getting started, i am realizing how different it is from lake fishing.

i live in the portland area and am looking to get into fishing steelhead, chinook, trout, and anything else that is new to me. what type of rod and reel should i get that is most universal in fishing steelhead and chinook (and trout?). do you only fly fish for trout? and do you only use a spinning reel for steelhead and chinook?

also- i did a little hiking at eagle creek. any advice on fishing there? do i just get down in there and start casting around or are there certain stretches of the river where there are fish/are not fish..? again- river fishing seems to be night and day from lake fishing.

thanks in advance

Lot`s of good vids on youtube too. Just type in "spinner fishing" or "Jig fishing" or "drift fishing" and add whatever it is yer gonna target. EXAMPLE: YouTube - drift fishing for steelhead

I`d start targeting the brooders on the Clack or Sandy. The crick didn`t get the fish it usually doe`s. Go back in June for springers. Not that there aren`t any steel around. But the hatchery didn`t have their eggs last time I was up so I left it alone. Hopin what`s left in the system`ll swim up and not stop to spawn. It could be the end of the end.... It`s destined to be a salmon only fishery....

Steeeeeel:
Yarnies, flies, corkies, bait all produce when drifted. Spinners in size 3 for deep holes and 4&5 for faster water. Go with green, chartreuse, blue, black, chrome and bronze/copper and of course red, pink and stuff. Bobber and jig work well in the right conditions too. Like said above, find one that you feel the most confidence in and learn a body of water using it. I prefer drifting. I know my presentation is where the fish are, on the bottom. Spinners and spoons are my 2nd choice. SLAM! Gotta love that!

Have fun! Take yer time! It`s just fishin!!
 
troutdude

troutdude

Moderator
Joined
Jan 7, 2010
Messages
7,924
Location
Willy Valley, Oregon
Hey there...welcome to OFF!

X 2, on all of the previous ideas mentioned above.

I personally use a rod/reel combo that is specific to the type of fishing that I do. For example, I use 5' Ultralight spinning rods when fishing for trout with a small reel that balances nicely w/ the rod. I also use the lightest rods n' reels for steelies and nooks that I can too. But, since you're just starting out...it would be better to use slightly bigger/heavier duty rods for each specie.

You will eventually venture into more specialized gear/tackle as your skills progress. It's all part of evolving into a more skilled fisherpeep (and part of a growing and addictive epidemic).

Enjoy!
 
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