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Shaun Solomon

Shaun Solomon

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Mar 21, 2015
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Oregon
I’ve noticed that the folks that tend to piss and moan about lack of detail in reports are mostly lurkers and/or new accounts.

PM’s are still a thing, y’all. I’m totally done helping random people who haven’t demonstrated their bonafides. I tried it for years, and no good ever came of it. I 100% don’t mind working with people I know even slightly, but some hypothetical “haxnet69” or “SparkyBanxxx” Internet dweeb ain’t getting nothing, and all the self-entitled, neck-bearded, dweller-rage that may be directed at me ain’t gonna shift the needle.
 
O. mykiss

O. mykiss

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Nov 2, 2012
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144
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Oregon coastal river
In my opinion the internet has ruined dozens of our streams and rivers in Oregon. Every jackass that doesn't know what he's doing chases a report. Maybe he gets lucky and gets a fish but most likely he just clogs up holes and makes it impossible for fishermen that know what they are doing to fish the best water. It happened to me today.

If you are going to chase reports because somebody decided to let you know where they like to catch fish, learn local etiquette and don't be a richard. (no offense to any Richards out there)
I 100% agree with you. Several streams that I use to fish and saw few people have been ruined by another un-named Internet forum. People have lost the connection with the river. I remember when we had to watch the weather report and know how long it would take for a particular stream to drop. Also which streams dropped into shape right after the rains have stopped.
It’s sucks that the internet has ruined the outdoors. There is no substitute for years of experience knowing where to go at high water vs low water. The behavior of fish under different condition. I actually feel sad that the people today will never know what it takes to REALLY know a river, to be able to have double digit out of this world days because you have your finger on the pulse of the stream. In the words of the great Bill Herzog “ I will tell you when and how, but never where.”
 
hobster

hobster

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Eugene
In my opinion the internet has ruined dozens of our streams and rivers in Oregon. Every jackass that doesn't know what he's doing chases a report. Maybe he gets lucky and gets a fish but most likely he just clogs up holes and makes it impossible for fishermen that know what they are doing to fish the best water. It happened to me today.

If you are going to chase reports because somebody decided to let you know where they like to catch fish, learn local etiquette and don't be a richard. (no offense to any Richards out there)
This!!
 
S

Snopro

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The internet is a great tool if used correctly. Give white hot reports for the Wilson and Trask, the day before fishing the Kilchis.
 
S

Snopro

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It’s sucks that the internet has ruined the outdoors. There is no substitute for years of experience knowing where to go at high water vs low water. The behavior of fish under different condition. I actually feel sad that the people today will never know what it takes to REALLY know a river, to be able to have double digit out of this world days because you have your finger on the pulse of the stream.
I wonder how much of the ills we equate to the internet are just effects of a rapidly growing population squeezed into fewer spots to fish.

To say the internet has ruined the outdoors is a stretch. In many ways it enhances the old school knowledge you outline. I've taken the time to learn a few rivers the way you describe, but with instant access to data from USGS, Google Earth/Maps, FPC, PTAGIS, Windy, ODFW, WDFW, it's made me deadlier than ever. Just having internet access won't make a 10%er, you need to put in time on water.
 
Shaun Solomon

Shaun Solomon

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Mar 21, 2015
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376
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Oregon
Snopro, you make good points. Before the internet ruined the outdoors, it was magazines, and before that it was something else I’m sure. I can say with great conviction that it would be better by far if lazy people would go find their own bites, and that the internet has GREATLY exacerbated the problem of hot-spotting.

I’ll give you one example. For years any serious angler in Colorado knew about the stretch of river between Spinney and Elevenmile reservoirs. They call it the “Dream Stream.” It was never a secret. A guy who wrote for the Denver Post named Charlie Meyers did endless seasonal pieces on it, and it got pounded. Still, there were a TON of fish in there, and it could take the pressure.

Then came the internet, and it got stupid, just really bad. You couldn’t find a place to park, and both banks of the river were like muddy cattle ruts from the foot traffic. All the fish had torn faces and several flies in their fins, sides and faces. I pulled eight flies off of one fish I caught, mostly in the sides and tail. You can’t convince me the internet was a good thing for that section of river.

The fish-iest I have ever been was when I was in my 20s and I was fishing every single day, literally. I’ve been dialed on spots through pure effort, and there is nothing to compare with the feeling. But because of everyone needing continuous validation, people want to skip the hard work part and get right to the circle jerk. It’s not ok, it simultaneously diminishes the rewards and raises people’s expectations. If you go by internet standards, everyone nukes fish every time they go, and anyone who has actually spent days/weeks/months/years getting dialed on a body of water can tell you that is just unrealistic. So yeah I get what you are saying, and to a certain extent even agree with you, but I’d still rather not have to deal with hot-spotting.

cheers man.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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don't be a richard. (no offense to any Richards out there)
Filed away in my memory banks, pun intended, for future refererence and potential usage. LOL
 
P

pcstock

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Sep 2, 2021
Messages
33
In my opinion the internet has ruined dozens of our streams and rivers in Oregon. Every jackass that doesn't know what he's doing chases a report. Maybe he gets lucky and gets a fish but most likely he just clogs up holes and makes it impossible for fishermen that know what they are doing to fish the best water. It happened to me today.

If you are going to chase reports because somebody decided to let you know where they like to catch fish, learn local etiquette and don't be a richard. (no offense to any Richards out there)
I for one, do not "chase reports". I do not have a boat which limits my options a ton. While I am only a few years into fishing for salmon and steelhead, I have put in hundreds of hours on the Sandy, Clack, Columbia and Willy. Plunking, bobbering, spooning and spinning all over the place. So while I may not know 100% what I am doing, how else am I to learn the local rivers than to get out there. Most people are very willing to help out someone new to a fishery.

Other than Meldrum Bar, I almost never see others near me when I am fishing. So hopefully I am not a Richard ruining the holes of the old pros like Jamison.

I went out on a boat a month ago and had 4 takedowns and landed two (released one wild Coho). We were trolling around Terminal 6 on the Columbia. All hookups were on a Brad's Superbait with a silver 360 flasher and 16 oz of lead. I have never had so much fun fishing in my entire life. I do not expect that this report will be ruining coho fishing on the Columbia.

IMG 5879
 
S

Snopro

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HR
I went out on a boat a month ago and had 4 takedowns and landed two (released one wild Coho). We were trolling around Terminal 6 on the Columbia. All hookups were on a Brad's Superbait with a silver 360 flasher and 16 oz of lead. I have never had so much fun fishing in my entire life. I do not expect that this report will be ruining coho fishing on the Columbia.
First of all, nice one. Congratulations on your success and having a great time. It sounds like you're hooked. I have great news for you, it only gets better. SBs, 360s and a lb of lead will get the job done in big water, but doesn't give the sporty little coho a good opportunity to show off their skills. When you have one crush a flatlined plug with the rod is in your hand, hammer a swung spinner or spoon, or race ten feet to smash a twitched jig, it's going to blow your mind. Don't even get me started on "where's your bobber?" egg bites.

As for hot spotting you bring up a couple key points and you're right, the way you gave info won't be ruining the fishery. First, you waited a month to give it out. Second, it's a huge river and while we can tell where you are in the photo, it's not giving away the location of where you hooked the fish. Let's contrast that with a couple photos on insta of a lucky fisherman playing and landing a huge chinook from a well known rock or sandbar on the Wilson dated yesterday. Worse would be a video. Not cool.

To me hot spotting is directly related to the size of the water body and amount of traffic it currently is subject to. The Ocean, Lower Willamette, and Lower Columbia are fine to give up the goods on anytime. Those little trib holes with light traffic, keep that info off the net.
 
jamisonace

jamisonace

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Other than Meldrum Bar, I almost never see others near me when I am fishing. So hopefully I am not a Richard ruining the holes of the old pros like Jamison.
I'm not sure if you're bragging (which you accused me of) or making a point.

I'm far from an old pro but I do know the difference between hot spotting a coho fishery on the columbia and hot spotting chinook fishing tiny coastal streams. Especially since most fishermen know this was one of the best coho years of this millenia while chinook fisheries have struggled for the past few years.

Ask all the questions you want, just don't get butt hurt when people don't want to give up intel.

I got a great PM from a new member the other day. He asked something like......"I understand if you don't want to share but could you tell me where I'd have a good chance at getting a chinook before it's all over?"

My response wasn't specific but I was happy to share a few streams that have good runs of late chinook including the stream where this fish was caught.

@pcstock your response to C-run before I even had a chance to respond didn't exactly make me feel like giving you tips.
 
Last edited:
P

pcstock

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Man.... I wasn't looking for tips. I was just curious.
 
P

pcstock

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First of all, nice one. Congratulations on your success and having a great time. It sounds like you're hooked. I have great news for you, it only gets better. SBs, 360s and a lb of lead will get the job done in big water, but doesn't give the sporty little coho a good opportunity to show off their skills. When you have one crush a flatlined plug with the rod is in your hand, hammer a swung spinner or spoon, or race ten feet to smash a twitched jig, it's going to blow your mind. Don't even get me started on "where's your bobber?" egg bites.

As for hot spotting you bring up a couple key points and you're right, the way you gave info won't be ruining the fishery. First, you waited a month to give it out. Second, it's a huge river and while we can tell where you are in the photo, it's not giving away the location of where you hooked the fish. Let's contrast that with a couple photos on insta of a lucky fisherman playing and landing a huge chinook from a well known rock or sandbar on the Wilson dated yesterday. Worse would be a video. Not cool.

To me hot spotting is directly related to the size of the water body and amount of traffic it currently is subject to. The Ocean, Lower Willamette, and Lower Columbia are fine to give up the goods on anytime. Those little trib holes with light traffic, keep that info off the net.
Thanks Snopro. I am VERY eager to get some Salmon and Steelhead from the bank. I have been trying for a long time now. I can say my drifting and bobber fishing has developed well. I try to spend as much time at the popular spots on the Sandy every weekend. Dabney, Oxbow, Dodge etc... I have not gone up to the hatchery as it sounds like there are TONS of people fishing there.

I was given some advice on another forum so I did post that pic and story the day I caught it! I was far too excited not to show the results and give heartfelt thanks to those who gave me advice. I had never trolled for salmon or fished on a boat before so I was amazed I even got a biter, let alone 4. This was my first ever salmon so I was pretty fired up. Especially since the boat was a pleasure craft, we had no net or bonker (fashioned one up, after losing the first one on the swim platform, by filling up my HydroFlask with water).

I fully understand the points being made about small tributaries. But I just didn't know there were still secret rivers out there. Given all the great info in books like Fishing In Oregon, I figured most/all of this was public knowledge if you look around for it. And I certainly was NOT looking for anyone to give up a particular hole. I wouldn't ask and wouldn't offer if asked, on the internet. The most I will typically ask is, what species' are available in an area I have never fished, OR if it isn't worth fishing.

For example, I will be on the Umpqua near Roseburg in early December. I did not ask where to fish or with what. I just asked if there will be Smallmouth around that late in the season. People suggested that Winter Steelhead would be the only viable option.

I realize that the internet makes all of this much easier but it isn't really any different than asking a friend, family member, or someone at the fishing store what size herring to use or what size hooks are good for Steelhead vs Chinook.

In this particular case I was just simply curious.

All the best everyone,
P
 
S

Snopro

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I realize that the internet makes all of this much easier but it isn't really any different than asking a friend, family member, or someone at the fishing store what size herring to use or what size hooks are good for Steelhead vs Chinook.
Have to disagree, there is a big difference. Would you have 100,000 people listening in when you ask friends, family or store help for advice?

There aren't any secret rivers. They just aren't good all the time. Umpqua for smallmouth would be a good example.
 
P

pcstock

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I would not mind 100,000 people listening to me ask "what color herring should I get for coho under a diver?", or "how much lead should I plan to bring for plunking in Warrendale?"
 
jamisonace

jamisonace

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I would not mind 100,000 people listening to me ask "what color herring should I get for coho under a diver?", or "how much lead should I plan to bring for plunking in Warrendale?"
I'm my experience, the guys that know the least share the most.
 
C

Carp

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Nov 25, 2013
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Happy Valley
I personally give out spots to people that I know won't bring a crowd (max 2 people), and keep the place clean . For myself I don't have a lot of time spending on the river so I tend to ask few people on spots but it's due to my work schedule where I only have 1 day out of 2 weeks to fish . But everyone has their own opinions.
 
C_Run

C_Run

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I've been away from my desktop computer for over a week and could only see the response to my glib comment (#6) on my newfangled smart cellular telephone due to not having memorized my OFF password. I'm proud of you guys for politely discussing this subject again even though it was a hijack to jamisonace's original post. I'd also like to thank jamisonace for inviting me to fish on 11/9 and getting me into my first salmon since 2019. Cheers.
 

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jamisonace

jamisonace

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I've been away from my desktop computer for over a week and could only see the response to my glib comment (#6) on my newfangled smart cellular telephone due to not having memorized my OFF password. I'm proud of you guys for politely discussing this subject again even though it was a hijack to jamisonace's original post. I'd also like to thank jamisonace for inviting me to fish on 11/9 and getting me into my first salmon since 2019. Cheers.

Your comment provided the most excitement this forum has seen in months!

As always, It was a pleasure having you in my boat. I sure wish the fishing hadn't slowed down so quickly. I was hoping to battle a few of those guys.
 
F

Fred

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I would not mind 100,000 people listening to me ask "what color herring should I get for coho under a diver?", or "how much lead should I plan to bring for plunking in Warrendale?"
That’s different. What they mean is like a conversation I have with a friend saying hey man I caught my personal best steelhead at so and so river and then hundreds of people see that and go fish the river. That’s hot spotting. If I say hey man I caught some nice trout at hagg lake nobody’s going to be mad at me. If I say I caught a limit of steelhead at some small local creek on the coast all the locals will get mad because a bunch of pressure will be sent to a little system that doesn’t have enough room for a ton of fisherman. I use to think people who didn’t share locations were being selfish and just didn’t want to share their spot, but most of them will share the location if they get to know you. A poacher, litter bug etc can go to your spot and you can’t filter who gets your information if you post it online for all to see. There’s people who might follow the laws but they might go fish that spot a ton and tell their 20 uncles and then your spot can get trashed. Then it becomes trash combat fishing. I enjoy company when fishing and I love to chat with other anglers on the river/lake, but I enjoy the tranquility of some of my spots where I almost never see another fisherman. Also if you do ask someone online where they are fishing don’t be surprised if you get poked fun at and be understanding of the fact that most people aren’t willing to share locations with strangers. If hot spotting wasn’t real we would all be sharing the secret local spots. If your understanding and respectful people will share spots with you even without you asking them too.
 
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pcstock

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Once again..... I was not looking for spots.
 

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