Newbie steelhead tips?

I've done lots of fishing around the state, but I've never been able to figure out winter steelhead fishing. I've caught a few with guides, but nearly all of the times I've tried going by myself I've gotten skunked. Last year I fished the Sandy around Oxbow park several times without any luck whatsoever. If anyone has tips for fishing the Sandy or any similar rivers that might not be so crowded (I also live pretty close to the coast) I'd really appreciate some advice. From what I'm seeing on the reports people are catching them across the state and I'd really like to get in on the action!

Also, I'm primarily restricted to bank fishing so I'd appreciate tips on how to fish from the bank. Thank you!
 

pinstriper

Well-known member
This is my experience as well, and the problem is not picking the right place. I think I'm picking water that I can get to, based on parking and the ability to get from the road to the water (and back !) Which might be the right place if the conditions line up.

The guys with boats are able to move to any spot regardless of who owns the bank or how steep it is from the road.

I went someplace yesterday that would be great with the water a little higher and colored. But gin-clear ? Not a good place at all.

I also realized that I do need to bring the waders, as I was at several spots where even wading knee-deep would put me in position to let a plug into the faster current that I just couldn't reach. Or I could have drifted into a deeper hole below the 18" deep gravel bed that was about all I could reach.
 

sapo

Member
yeah steelies especially winters are tough to catch, my best advice is keep moving around and find good water..hike in to tough spots and you may be rewarded, some of the forest roads on the coastal rivers have good spots
 

Hammer663s

New member
I'm learning a lot about this too, being new to steelies up here, but a very experienced fisherman for other stuff elsewhere. It seems in particular that you have to cover water to find fish. Me and the boy have fished the Wilson a few times recently to no success, all hike in. We moved around a good bit but didn't see/find fish. We did the Kilchis this weekend (low and gin clear) with a buddy in his drift boat and we covered 20x more water. We didn't see fish until 1/2 way down and then we saw plenty. All in water that would be very tough to get to on foot. We had several fish flash at bait, lost one, and landed one. We would have done better had I had the right (smaller) gear as the 10 lb leader was too much and my eggs were too large. The fish were spooky and could see us coming, and 9 year old isn't always subtle on his approach. ;) But he didn't give up and finally got one at the end of the day. :) Made it all worth it.IMG_1260.jpg

Mike
 
I have been every weekend for the last 5 weeks, up and down the Clackamas. Granted some of those trips were early, but fish are being caught according to pics and posts on forums. So I kept going. I have spent a ton of money and time to get out there and last weekend spent a lot of time climbing, falling, and finally getting to the hard to fish spots where not a lot of people go and I too have had zero success. Looking at the numbers so far, the run isn't huge and we all know the Clack isn't where the numbers are strongest. I have had run in's with some real a holes on the river too. A lot of bank guys take things WAY too serious out there, and I am not in to combat fishing. I don't do hog lines in my boat for the same reasons. Fishing for some, is an excuse to be rude and for me and my kids it is fun without equal and memories we will have for a lifetime. I am not going to give up my quest for steel, but I may slow down a bit and if I don't get fish because I choose not to fight for position or climb a mountain to find them, I am okay with that.

Discouraged but still trying. I can't wait for springers and then the steel will be completely erased from my plans until summer and I hear summer steel is easier fishing. I hope?

Cheers,

Chris
 

homerhomer

New member
I've done lots of fishing around the state, but I've never been able to figure out winter steelhead fishing. I've caught a few with guides, but nearly all of the times I've tried going by myself I've gotten skunked. Last year I fished the Sandy around Oxbow park several times without any luck whatsoever. If anyone has tips for fishing the Sandy or any similar rivers that might not be so crowded (I also live pretty close to the coast) I'd really appreciate some advice. From what I'm seeing on the reports people are catching them across the state and I'd really like to get in on the action!

Also, I'm primarily restricted to bank fishing so I'd appreciate tips on how to fish from the bank. Thank you!
Everybody fishes a little different. You need to find what technique works for you. that's bobber and jig, spinners, spoons,drifting bait or corkies, fly or even plunking. All these have there own skill and will catch fish if dinner correctly.

Fish rivers during peak and when the water conditions are at a fishable level.

Go to you local library, or look online and get every steelhead guide book they have. He'll mine had DVD videos.

And learn to read water. Lol, really. If you want to get away from the crowds.

Good luck









Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk
 

Artwo

Active member
As said above, pick a technique that's comfortable to you and master it. Bobber/jig is a good place to start, fairly inexpensive, highly effective, and relatively easy to learn. Next, don't go all over Oregon fishing every river you can. Pick a river, find a couple spots that look good and really learn them. Heard a good piece of advise from a pretty well known local steelhead fisherman, "pick a spot and learn/fish it until you've caught 5 fish out of it, then move on to another."

Good luck out there and tight lines.........
 
Top