Need/want new floating line, Suggestions?

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the_intimidator03

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Alright... I figure that its time to start getting some better quality gear for my flyfishin. I have a cheap outfit that is loaded with a DT floating line, My issue is the front 6 feet sink. I figure ill keep it as a spare and may as well replace it with new line of mid range price/quality
My rod is a 5/6W I do alright with it can probably do 30-40 foot cast so... what more do i need LOL The type of fishing i do mostly is still water pond/lake fishing, I want to focus more on rivers such as Coast Fork, Row rivers, Also would like to try the upper middle fork and maybe north fork willamette river. I know some of you are familiar with this kind of water and its more small stream fishin i would think.
I mainly fish nymphs under an indicator but am tryin to learn non indicator fishing and have yet to really try dry flies.

Before i ramble off topic, What line(s) would you recommend? WFF or DT floating? Pro's and Con's vs each?

Hope i havent confused ALL of you yet
 
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GungasUncle

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First - have you tried turning the line around and fishing the other end? One of the perks of a double tapered line.

But if you're just jonsing for a new line - I like a double taper line myself. Used to be a weight-forward guy - but double taper lines provide a more delicate presentation (which is good when fishing dries) AND they roll cast much better. I prefer floating lines for most of my fishing. If money is an issue - the Scientific Anglers Air Cel lines are good, expensive options. If money isn't too tight - I'd spring for their Mastery line, as those lines cast superbly. I'd also look at the Cortland Fair Play line for a budget line, or the 444 series for their better line.

If you hardly ever roll cast, then a weight forward taper isn't a bad way to go - but my casting style, and fishing style are more suited for double tapered lines.

Other good options are Orvis' lines - their Hy-Flote (budget) or their Wonderline (better line). Unless things have changed, Orvis' lines are made by Scientific Anglers, and are essentially the same as their Air Cel and Mastery lines, but with the Orvis name on the box :p

The budget lines from all makers will run you $25-40 - the better lines are going to be $60+

Pros for a DT line...

- delicate presentation
- reversible ends
- excellent for roll casting

WF pros

- excellent for distance casting when using over-head type casts
- better line for novice casters, generally
- better for casting wind resistant flies

Since you're more into small streams - I really think the double taper would be the way to go for you. You're not going to be punching out 70' casts on windy waters. A DT line will be fine for nymphing - especially when you start fishing without indicators. And for dry fly fishing - DT lines excel.

I don't know what kind of rod you're using now - but if it's a low end rod - going with the higher end line - you'll be able to stick with the same line when/if you decide to upgrade rods later.

Take your rod down to a fly shop and ask to try it out with a #5 or #6 line in both DT and WF - if you buy the line from them they shouldn't have a problem accomodating this.
 
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the_intimidator03

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Thank you for the prompt midnight response, on the dot i may add, LOL. I do roll cast and have been getting better at it. And as for the comment of low end rod higher end line... that was kind of my thought when i upgrade to a better 5-6w, and thanks for asking about trying it out with a 5 or 6w line cause i have no clue how one feels to the other LOL I think its time to try and get some more flies and such. Thanks again
 
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Sinkline

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RIO has lines with tapers designed for about any specific application you can think of and they cast well! I fish RIO lines for every use except my clear intermediate. I still prefer the Cortland 444 Clear Camo Intermediate. The ol' 444 Clear Camo is the most supple in cold weather.

Have a look at the RIO lines (link below).
Rio Fly Lines at BEARSDEN.COM


Randy
 
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the_intimidator03

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thank you sinkline for the input, as a matter of fact one place im looking at hitting hopefully at least once this year is middle fork of willy from about oakridge up to hills creek for some beautiful wild trout. Also want to get back to diamond this year as well.
 
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Yohan

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RIO has lines with tapers designed for about any specific application you can think of and they cast well! I fish RIO lines for every use except my clear intermediate. I still prefer the Cortland 444 Clear Camo Intermediate. The ol' 444 Clear Camo is the most supple in cold weather.

Have a look at the RIO lines (link below).
Rio Fly Lines at BEARSDEN.COM

Randy

+1

I even cut up a 444 camo to use as sink tips (on my rio floater) when I was fishing for coastal cutts off of Puget Sound beaches. Worked awesome.
 
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