Need rod advice.

T
troutmasta
I get Cabelas gifts cards through my work as a reward and I have accumulated quite a few. I feel like my next step in my journey as an angler is to learn to fly fish.
I would like a rod that I can catch steelies and maybe coho with, I fish for a lot of decent sized small mouth and I figred that would be fun, and of sourse the ocasional stocker. Is there a rod that would do all this? If not I would prefer salmon steelhead size. What weight is recommneded? What does the line weight mean? I know a little and used to have a very old fly rod but I only caught trout. Can I get a litlle help/advice plase.
-The want to-bee fly fisherman-
 
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B
bigsteel
I would get a 7 weight for an overall rod,,its a little heavy for trout but would work great for the bigger fish.the line weight is to match your line to the rod,,a 6 weight rod should be spooled with a 6 weight line,,some guys over line their reels but its not necessary.
 
troutdude
troutdude
troutmasta said:
I get Cabelas gifts cards through my work as a reward and I have accumulated quite a few.

Is your company hiring? I'd like to accumulate some of those gift cards too! :cool:

I'm not sure that I am even yet a "novice" fly peep; but BigSteel has OFFered a good suggestion for an "all around" rod.

I do wonder though, if it would be a good idea to get a 7/8 weight rod? That would allow you to use either weight line (7 for smaller fish & 8 for larger quarry). Or even if a 7/8/9 combo is a reasonable approach? I mention this, because I have heard of peeps using up to a 10 weight rod/line for the Nooks (and other such largish fish). And rods like a 7/8/9 are made. But, maybe a "combo" weight rod defeats the intent?

Just a thought...and I don't know if a "combo" weight rod is the best approach. So, I'm open to hearing comments from other--and more experienced--OFFers. I have had this same sort of question.
 
H
halibuthitman
when it comes to casting a rod is ALWAYS the heavier weight, any rod will cast 1-2 line weights up or down, When a person says a 7 wt is an all around good rod ( ive caught tons of winter steel on one ) its important to figure what brand action and length that rod is, for instance a 7 wt gloomis rod compared to a lami are 2 different creatures, a 7'6 glass rod will catch everything and always feel fun until you get that 14 lb coho on it, but also an action and build in a graphite fast action 7 wt is not really gonna be fun with much less than a pounder on. You need an 8 wt and a 4 wt and that can be done for relatively little money at cabelas.. good luck
 
C
ChezJfrey
halibuthitman said:
You need an 8 wt and a 4 wt and that can be done for relatively little money at cabelas.. good luck

Darn...I screwed myself because I got a 5 wt. and an 8 wt. ;)
 
V
Van
A 8wt is more appropriate for coastal winter steelhead. A TFO 8/9 wt would probably cover your bases for salmon and winter steelhead. Cabelas has a lot of decent house brands for not too much. You could pick up a salmon/steelhead rod and a trout rod for not too much.
 
GungasUncle
GungasUncle
You can do it all with a 10 weight rod, but it won't be any fun. You really need separate outfits to get the most out of the experience. For trout, panfish, and small bass a 4-6 weight rod is the best for a beginner. For coho, steelhead, and big bass - an 8 or 9 weight will be more appropriate. Medium or medium fast action rods are best for most beginners. Ultra fast action rods require more precise timing. Slow action rods are wonderful to fish, but also might not be the best beginner's tool.

Good starter outfits can be had easily from Cabela's. For a trout & panfish outfit, the Three Forks rod paired with a Prestige Plus reel and line in 8' to 9' (they make an 8, 8'6", and 9') in a 5 weight would be a good general outfit. That'll set you back $60 for rod, reel, line, backing, and a leader. Just add flies and water and you're fishing.

For salmon and steel, the Three Forks 9' 8 weight is a good choice. You can get it paired with the Prestige Plus reel and line, etc also for $60. These are great starter outfits - there's no need in spending a lot of cash right out the gate, just get what you need to learn the mechanics - and if fly fishing is something you actually live - buy a better rod then. Pick up a few dozen flies for each rod, get some casting lessons, and welcome to the world of fly flingin' :)
 
T
troutmasta
Thanks for the help. What is the line weight I should be using? is it the same as normal fishing like 12 pound for coho or is it lighter, and what is the difference between tippet and regular leader for a casting rod? thanks again.
 
T
Trout
Troutmasta - lots of good advice in the thread and bottom line is you will need 2 rigs to cover trout and large fish like salmon (just like in spin fishing). An 8wt outfit will handle any steelhead and the occasional salmon - and what you are looking for is a 9ft rod with what is called "fast action" or "tip action" ... which in general is easier to cast. For a trout rod a 5wt or 6wt will work fine and here maybe a "medium-fast" rod which is a bit more flexible would be best. A medium action rod is very "noodely" (wobbly ?) and while fun to have a trout on they are harder to cast.

As I have said in many threads the best thing you can do to get your bearings in the fly fishing world is to get a copy of "The Curtis Creek Manifesto" for about $9. It is a bit dated but it is a classic and very fun read on fly fishing. This will cover your line - leader - tippet question and more.

Unless you are a hard core steelhead / salmon fisher --- my gut tells me you should pick up a 6wt 9ft fast action rod to start with and cut your teeth on some trout fishing. Everything you learn will scale up to the larger hardware. And my 6wt has landed a couple of 20+ inchers on the Deschutes. And on a trout rig you don't need to drop a ton of money on a reel that will handle a salmon. So for a trout rig you'll spend more on the rod ($100-$140) and a little on the reel ($30). On the salmon rig it will be the same for the rod but the reel will be $80 - $100.

Thats a lot to chew on -- good luck and ask a lot of questions.
 
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brandon4455
brandon4455
halibuthitman said:
when it comes to casting a rod is ALWAYS the heavier weight, any rod will cast 1-2 line weights up or down, When a person says a 7 wt is an all around good rod ( ive caught tons of winter steel on one ) its important to figure what brand action and length that rod is, for instance a 7 wt gloomis rod compared to a lami are 2 different creatures, a 7'6 glass rod will catch everything and always feel fun until you get that 14 lb coho on it, but also an action and build in a graphite fast action 7 wt is not really gonna be fun with much less than a pounder on. You need an 8 wt and a 4 wt and that can be done for relatively little money at cabelas.. good luck

i have a 4wt wind river and an 8wt wind river. ican do everything with those two rods. and it's true too. got my 4wt for udner 50 buucks and my 8wt pre spooled combo was only 69 bucks. they are good rods too
 
T
tangov559
Brandon,
just wondering if you mind sharing where you got your 4wt from?
 
brandon4455
brandon4455
got it from cabelas online. on sale. it's an excellent rod, and worth looking into for a trout rod. 8'6 4piece 4wt it can lay dries down nice and delicate but can also chuck heavy double nymph setups. . sadly, i just checked cabela's and the sale has ended. so it is 89.99 for the rod.
 
V
Van
A 4wt is going to be too light if you plan on hitting up the Deschutes or a similar river. They work great for small streams and the sort. A 6wt would cover your bases very well.
 

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