Lure fishing for trout, better in the winter?

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mlinkletter

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Hey everyone just a quick question. I am new to the game and trying to figure things out, so far the wife and I have had two very successful trips but on both occasions I can't get a thing on a lure but we both limit out on powerbait.

I am certainly willing to accept that it may be a technique issue, I have tried different colors of rooster tails, bang tails, and kastmasters and can't seem to get a bite.

My question is could it also be the time of year? Since the water temps in the lakes are higher, the fish are lower. I am just casting from the bank/dock and retrieving. I have tried letting it sink and then retrieve but usually wind up with a hook full of weeds, if I don't let it sink I have gotten no hits.

Are these types of lures generally more successful in the colder weather months?

Thanks for any help or advice!
 
Admin

Admin

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I can't call myself an expert but here's my 0.02 ;) Lures are not more successful in the colder weather months. May be even quite the opposite. Chances are better that trout will follow and hit your lure in warm water. In cold water you need to put your lure right under fishies nose,and if it didn't hit it, that's it, it will not follow your lure. The key is the size/color of lures you use. In winter I use #2-3 Blue Fox for trout & #4-5 for steelhead. Now, (in summer) I use #2-3 for steelhead ;) Use #0-#1 black (a body and a blade) for trout. In early morning use brighter colors (not painted blades). Cast, wait 4 - 8 seconds, depending on the depth. Retrieve with jerks. Work your lure all the way till it touches the bank. During the summers I caught a lot of trout when I was already taking my lure out off the water. It almost never happened during winter.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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X 2. In the winter, bait with smelly scents are the ticket.

In the summer, you should have no problem getting trout with spinners or spoons. Go "darker" on overcast mornings or early/late in the day (black or black n' brass). As it gets lighter switch to brass / gold colored stuff. When the sun is out full bore, then go shiny (silver / chrome body n' blade).

And small is best, especially if you are fishing in streams with low water flow/volume. Size 0 or 1 for spinners is best under those conditions. Size 2 or 3 at most, in larger / deeper streams or lakes.

If you get a chance, get yourself a copy of "Spinner Fishing for Salmon, Steelhead and Trout", by Jed Davis. You will be GLAD that you did!
 
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mlinkletter

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Thanks guys. Looks like the issue is me. I just put in a request for my library to put a hold on the Jed Davis book so I will read that ASAP. As far as sizing goes I have 1/8ox rooster and bang tails and 1/4 oz Kastmasters. Are these in the right range?
 
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Green_Tackle

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As far as sizing goes I have 1/8ox rooster and bang tails and 1/4 oz Kastmasters.

Yeah, those sizes should work just fine in the lakes. You could go even smaller. With the kastmasters I usually go to a 1/8oz first and only use a 1/4oz if there is a particular cover (fallen tree, submerged ledge or drop off, etc.) that is far away that I want to try to cast out too. For the regular lakes (where trout are stocked or can get larger) I use #1 or #2 spinners mostly. For the high mountain lakes or streams where the trout are itty bitty I use #0 or #1 spinners.

In the spring and fall, you shouldn't have too much trouble getting to trout from the bank if you put in the time. You'll typically catch them close to the bank. Cast out in the "fan pattern" and then move down the bank 5 feet or so and keep on the move. If you start seeing them following your lure in but not striking then you may want to try a different color or vary your retrieve as you already touched on. Sometimes I reel for a few cranks and then let it drop for a second or two and then repeat. Sometimes a faster retrieve with a sort of twitch here and there gets them to strike. And sometimes slow and steady does the trick.

If you're bringing in a pile of weeds with your lure then you won't likely catch fish. They don't seem to keen to strike a bunch of vegetation being pulled through the water. Try to keep the lure just above the top of the vegetation or try a lure that doesn't snag in the weeds like a floating Rapala minnow. During the spring and fall the trout don't seem to mind rising up towards the surface to hit something that looks appealing.
 
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Thuggin4Life

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Trout get less active in the colder water that comes with colder weather so lures aren't as affective. they try to save energy so chasing a lure isn't on there mind and they want guarnteed food that require less energy to get. and also i agree with everything everyon else said.
 
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Left Bank

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Here's my 2 cents....What I've found with roostertails (one of my main go-to's btw) is that trout can be very finicky. I'll use one that doesn't get a hit but will end up with another one that has basically the same color or same markings and I get a hit on almost every cast. Makes no sense but that's why I keep switching up and try to keep quite a few with me.
For castmasters I've found that they only work (for me anyway) within 2 weeks after a stocking. After that I'll continue to try them but have little success.
 
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beaverfan

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I have had a ton of success with Kastmasters. Both in lakes and rivers I have caught a huge number of fish with them. The key is finding the depth/speed at which to retrieve it and whether or not to jerk it on the retrieve. It is a very versatile lure that will catch most species of fish.
 
troutdude

troutdude

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I, too, have had GREAT success w/ Kastmasters.

Color is another key. Generally w/ any "lure" you want to use silver/chrome on bright sunny days. At dusk and pre dawn, you want to use brass/gold colors. And in dark / overcast situations go to bronze / green / blue and even black.

Size is also key. Lighter lures will work in the shallows or on / near the surface. Heavier ones are used to drop down deeper. The fish will be in different place at different times of the day, and in different seasons too.

I have also had luck w/ several lures by using a Lift / drop / retrieve / repeat method too. Most fish will hit when it drops. They most likely are triggered to strike, because they see it as wounded prey.
 
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rainbowfisherman

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I've had the same problem, just can't get fish to bite lures. Ive had them chase but never take it. Seems funny to me
 
troutdude

troutdude

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Again, VARY your speed. Or try the lift & drop & retrieve. Or, try a different color or size. The fish obviously like it enough to chase it. So, change / adjust your technique; and I'll bet $$$ that they will hit it.

I also forgot to mention one other thing. I used to use a snap swivel on the end of my main line, so I could easily interchange lures. However, I am NO longer using snap swivels as they will affect the intended action of the lure. So, you may want to take that into consideration too.
 
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mgdguy

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I have also had luck w/ several lures by using a Lift / drop / retrieve / repeat method too. Most fish will hit when it drops. They most likely are triggered to strike, because they see it as wounded prey.

2nd this! I had good success getting a quick strike with this method after just doing a slow retreive a few times in the same spot. Lift drop retreive, repeat! :D
 
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Boo

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Rooster Tails are okay. I do well with them off and on, but I haven't seen anyone mention the Mepps Aglia. In some of the ponds I fish the Mepps Aglia is like the Rainbow Trout version of crack cocaine! Slow retrieve -- pause -- slow retrieve -- pause -- FISH ON!
 
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Mbressler13

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My god this is helpful for me. Growing up basically I was a worm and bobber kid. Never really got to try other ways. Not that I am older and doing stuff on my own I am doing more variety of baits and lures. Never understood why I don't have much luck with them until now. Excited to try different retrieval methods next time I am on the water.
 
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OutdoorsTeen

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No one has said panther martins. They go down deep ,quick. black and gold is the best. Also any mettallic colors. Mepps longcaster for steelhead and salmon are good for big brooders.
 
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SturgeonSurgeon

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I am new to trout fishing and just in the last couple of days I have caught about 10 trout and one steelhead on rooster tails. They haven't really been going for it to much until I put on Mikes Scents Earthworm and then the fish go nuts. You can buy it at walmart.
 
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