Lightweight kayak fishfinder

TimberTodd

Well-known member
I am looking at adding a fishfinder to my kayak, but want to keep the weight down as much as possible. I like what I read about the RayMarine Dragonfly4. I am cautious though not knowing what I would need for a battery. I do not want to pack a large 12 volt battery. I have looked into the Hawkeye Fishtrax 1C, but the only reviews seem to be by the manufacturer. I am also still in the dark after researching them as to whether they show structure or not. My primary use will be for finding structure, depth and bottom contours. Anyone have experience with small portable fishfinders?
 

C_Run

Well-known member
I don't know about that model bet I'd recommend color and not grayscale for the finder in a kayak. I'm about to replace my Humminbird because I can hardly read it when the sun is out. Yeah, a 12 volt battery weighs maybe three pounds +.
 

TimberTodd

Well-known member
Thanks C_ Run for the insight. I am gonna have to look closer at 12 volt batteries. I was thinking I was going to have to power one with a 12 volt deep cycle like I used with my electric trolling motor. That rascal weighed way more than 3 lbs.
.
 

pinstriper

Well-known member
TimberTodd;n607243 said:
Thanks pinstriper. What brand of battery are you using?

Pffft. Whatever Amazon was selling and also fit the 8" round hatch battery kit from Hobie. SLA batteries are fungible.

In fact, IIRC when I bought the Hobie battery kit from Amazon it offered up a package deal that included a battery. I took the deal.
 

Casting Call

Active member
C_Run;n607240 said:
I don't know about that model bet I'd recommend color and not grayscale for the finder in a kayak. I'm about to replace my Humminbird because I can hardly read it when the sun is out. Yeah, a 12 volt battery weighs maybe three pounds +.

Look into a portable self contained batt. (4 to six dbl AAs, color by hummingbird Tony
 

GaryP1958

Active member
Go to Bimart and get a small lawnmower battery about 25 bucks I run my Ship to Shore on it, I also have Humminbird takes 6 AA batteries and 99 cent store ones last about 8 hours. Works well and very light!
 

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pinstriper

Well-known member
Go to Bimart and get a small lawnmower battery about 25 bucks I run my Ship to Shore on it, I also have Humminbird takes 6 AA batteries and 99 cent store ones last about 8 hours. Works well and very light!

I used one of those for a while. It puts drag on one side of the boat and I was always fighting to maintain directional control.
 

plumbertom

Active member
Okay, cons to those SLA batteries. They are heavy. face it they have lead in them.
The only way to cut the weight is to lower the available power life.
SLA batteries can have problems, like voltage drop, in cold weather.
One more thing to realize is they can have a short battery life.
It's hard to find a small deep cycle SLA battery. They aren't intended to be drained fully.
So, Positive: Lots of power for the money
Negatives: Heavy, not good in cold, short shelf life, and the voltage can drop below 12V
Most Kayakers today that want to minimize weight use lithium batteries.
Small and light weight can fit almost anywhere, full power delivery until the battery is depleted, less power loss in cold weather, and an exceptional battery life.
They are expensive though and they have had problems with fire risk although those have been mostly addressed by the makers.
So, Positives: Light, small, all 12V, no cold weather battery loss, and longer shelf life.
Negatives: EXPENSIVE and must take precautions for battery safety
 

DrTheopolis

Well-known member
A friend has a Bottom Line Fishin Buddy. Takes a few AA batteries, weighs next to nothing, shows depth, structure, and an occasional fish blip. Nothing fancy, in fact crude -- but light and cheap.
 

TimberTodd

Well-known member
Thank you for that kind offer my friend. I think I am going to plan a trip to WestMarine in Tigard and compare the Hook4 and Dragonfly4 units. I believe that is the direction I am headed.
 

pinstriper

Well-known member
What kind of boat ? Some have the ability to mount the transducer in a scupper. Otherwise you can cement it to the bottom of the hull on the inside, using goop or other marine sealant.
 

TimberTodd

Well-known member
Its a Nucanoe Frontier. I am considering one of 3 mounting options. Either through a scupper, magnetic mount to the side of the hull or one of the battery boxes with the bendable arm extension for the transducer, I am leaning towards that 3rd option.
 

pinstriper

Well-known member
TimberTodd;n607349 said:
Its a Nucanoe Frontier. I am considering one of 3 mounting options. Either through a scupper, magnetic mount to the side of the hull or one of the battery boxes with the bendable arm extension for the transducer, I am leaning towards that 3rd option.

Ah. Ok, so you're not going to paddle that beast much anyway, so a transducer arm won't hurt you.

Are you planning on a small gas motor or a large electric trolling motor ? Either way I'm surprised you're worried about shaving weight off the fish finder.
 

Andrew.p

New member
Mostly Fishfinder needs extra battery pack. But there are few fishfinders which have buit in battery system, but those are not good as the traditional fishfinder.

I am using Garmin Striker 4 on my Kayak with external waterproof battery pack. Working fine since 3 years, no problem faced.

My some clients always ask what the best Best Kayak Fish Finders. so i made made a list, i you going to ask same questions. 😜
  1. Garmin Striker 4 (My 😍)
  2. Lowrance HOOK Reveal
  3. Garmin Striker 4cv
  4. Lowrance Elite 9 Ti
These are my favorites, which i personally used. If have any question, don't hesitate.
 

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