Koke in fall creek?

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FishSlayer420

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So i was wondering if anyone has heard of there being kokanee in Fall Creek. My buddy caught what looked like one but someone else i talked to said there is none in there:think::think:
 
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Thuggin4Life

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So i was wondering if anyone has heard of there being kokanee in Fall Creek. My buddy caught what looked like one but someone else i talked to said there is none in there:think::think:

There are Kokanee. I got one. Look at the bottom fish. And it didn't have a black mouth so it wasn't a land locked chinook.
 
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Troutski

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Fish I.D. ...

Fish I.D. ...

There are Kokanee. I got one. Look at the bottom fish. And it didn't have a black mouth so it wasn't a land locked chinook.

Fish identification is up to the angler, make a mistake and it will cost you a healthy fine if the fish you thought you were keeping is in fact another species.
When in doubt use the picture portion of the ODFW synopsis for the body of water you are fishing in. Some lakes you can keep a particular species and the same fish in another lake will be catch and release. Practice good fish identification... it will make you a much better angler in the long run.

Chuck
 
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Thuggin4Life

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Fish identification is up to the angler, make a mistake and it will cost you a healthy fine if the fish you thought you were keeping is in fact another species.
When in doubt use the picture portion of the ODFW synopsis for the body of water you are fishing in. Some lakes you can keep a particular species and the same fish in another lake will be catch and release. Practice good fish identification... it will make you a much better angler in the long run.

Chuck

It was deffinantly a kokanee. In alaska we called Sockeye bluebacks and this little guy was a blueback for sure. But its good to always know the rules as it can change all of a sudden. Sometimes just walking under a bridge can change everything.
 
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JeannaJigs

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Old post i just saw, not to stir up anything, but...pretty sure that's not a koke. Rainbows start to turn silver once they've been in a reservoir for a decent length of time.


DSCN0943.jpg

This is a real small koke from O'Dell.

Take note of the tail fins, sharp edges, not rounded, and no spots.

If you want to slay some kokes, my dad's friend just got a bunch out of Triangle lake, real close to Eugene.

Just be careful, there's so many salmonid species in this state that are so very, very similiar in appearance, and so many strict rules, you don't want your gear jacked or a hefty fine, they don't mess around, even if it's accidental mis-identification.
 
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Thuggin4Life

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Yeah it does look a little different than yours but if you look close the top 2 are rainbows for sure. Hold over planters. And the bottom one is a native. That's the weirdest native rainbow i have ever seen. Usually the natives look better than the planters. Also it had no red side what so ever. Do juvenile chinook have black mouths? I know they are in fall creek.
 
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eric71m

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only sure fire way to tell a koke from any other species is by the gill rakers. the lil white things on the back side of the gills, Kokes have lots, and by that i mean more than 20, trout and kings have around 20 or less...;)
 
Troutski

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One more way...

One more way...

The other way is by simply looking on the back of the citation the Game Warden issues you for an illegally kept fish...;)
Sorry....I just couldn't resist :rolleyes:

Chuck
 
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JeannaJigs

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Yeah it does look a little different than yours but if you look close the top 2 are rainbows for sure. Hold over planters. And the bottom one is a native. That's the weirdest native rainbow i have ever seen. Usually the natives look better than the planters. Also it had no red side what so ever. Do juvenile chinook have black mouths? I know they are in fall creek.
The top two are planted redbands, the bottom is a native rainbow. Though they are both considered rainbows, the redband is a sub-species of the rainbow, and they are different. Coloring also changes post spawn. The rainbow species can vary quite a bit in the same body of water. Beware of any fish with a non amputated fin, make sure you know 100% without a doubt what it is, or it'll be expensive, and ya don't want that, trust me, found this out when I was 12.
 
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JeannaJigs

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Do juvenile chinook have black mouths? I know they are in fall creek.

here's a link to a Jack Chinook, what you'd find in Fall Creek. And yes, they have black mouths. Notice the spots only found on the upper back of the fish, not on the side.

chinook4.jpg

Hope this helps.

I have yet to get up there to try to catch any of them, but there's a pretty good population apparantly.
 
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Thuggin4Life

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The top two are planted redbands, the bottom is a native rainbow. Though they are both considered rainbows, the redband is a sub-species of the rainbow, and they are different. Coloring also changes post spawn. The rainbow species can vary quite a bit in the same body of water. Beware of any fish with a non amputated fin, make sure you know 100% without a doubt what it is, or it'll be expensive, and ya don't want that, trust me, found this out when I was 12.

I figured they were getting ready to spawn. I started noticing eggs in plump females a few weeks before we caught these. I wasn't sure but guessed that the color up just like a steelhead in spawning season. As for the fin, it's my understanding that when the book says open for trout that means clipped or non-clipped rainbows and cutthrought but when it says clipped only it means only the hatchery fish. Also most of the local resevoirs consider salmon a trout unless it is bigger than a certain length. But i always check the rules before i go anywhere, I can't afford anymore tickets.
 
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JeannaJigs

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I figured they were getting ready to spawn. I started noticing eggs in plump females a few weeks before we caught these. I wasn't sure but guessed that the color up just like a steelhead in spawning season. As for the fin, it's my understanding that when the book says open for trout that means clipped or non-clipped rainbows and cutthrought but when it says clipped only it means only the hatchery fish. Also most of the local resevoirs consider salmon a trout unless it is bigger than a certain length. But i always check the rules before i go anywhere, I can't afford anymore tickets.
I don't know the regs up there anymore, I haven't fished it since I was a kid, but good to always check before going out.
 

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