How to avoid snags?!!

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mahmichael

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Jun 28, 2009
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Corvallis
Hi all, I'm not an experienced fisherman and I get a lot of snags! I know those can happen to anybody but it's happening a lot to me and I lost several hardware on that! :(
Are there tips or methods to avoid that? That happens when I'm using a spinner or a spoon (even a jig! :think:).

Thanks in advance
 
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Drew9870

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Don't drag bait/lures across the bottom, either plunk a bait with minimal weight and raise the rod tip as you reel, or raise the rod tip and drop it back down (same with jigs, unless you just reel and twitch).

Lures can be fished different depths, start shallow and work your way down or vice versa, try to stay about 3-4ft off the bottom, usually the fish can still see it.
 
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halibuthitman

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if your steelhead fishing its all part of it, and means your doing a great job of being in "the zone" switching from trebles to smaller siwash hooks can help-
 
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ChezJfrey

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Granted, I've not caught a steelhead yet in my first season of giving it a go(though it's not lack of trying :) ), but here is what I've noticed... As the water has gotten warmer and the sun has come out, I've downsized my spinners/spoons when fishing that type of bait and I've caught a large number of trout due to the hook size now being small enough to grab them.

Most of those trout have come from turbulent water in potentially snag-riddled areas; that is where fish like to hang out. Those areas provide good cover from both current force and predatory eyes, so halibuthitman is surely correct in stating that the presentation is likely in the correct zone to catch fish.

I've also noticed, through trial-error, that I have learned ways to maneuver the rod/line so as to keep the lure working through those areas, but not get permanently hung up. One thing I can think of is try to minimize the amount of line that is in the water when it's traveling downstream; it often helps you keep your terminal deeper and prevents the current from grabbing a belly in the line, misdirecting your drift path and a side-effect is also preventing your line from wedging into obstacles...it just takes practice and sometimes a bit of luck to keep from having to break off from a snag you can't dislodge. Also, if you snag on the downstream travel, try walking a little upstream to dislodge it. If on the swing, or retrieval, let out some line, let the current take it, then give a pull. The force of the water can pull the lure out backwards from where it entered the snag.

Some days, it seems no matter what, I lose a handful or more of tackle. But others, I can walk away without losing any, or perhaps only one or two.

Either way, the cliche I've heard is that if you're not fishing the snags, you're not fishing the fish...or something like that :)
 
F

Finneus Polebender

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The sacrifice is worth the risk ,finnese is the key ie knowing bottom or snag from bite . Other than that once you learn to fish weedless, slow your movements, and gently pull through the hazzards, the rewards far out weigh the lost gear on the occasional snag hook set.
 
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eggs

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Sandy, Oregon
think of it as an offering to the river gods... they will reward you in time..!

Anyone every wonder what the sandy, clack or wilson would look like if you drained all the water? I bet it would shine and be visable from space..
 
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ChezJfrey

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think of it as an offering to the river gods... they will reward you in time..!

Anyone every wonder what the sandy, clack or wilson would look like if you drained all the water? I bet it would shine and be visable from space..

I think it would look like $$$$$$$$$$$ ;)
 
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halibuthitman

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withall that lead and yarn I imagine it would look like a toxic craft store blew up... I cannot even begin to fathom the amount of lead on the bottom of the columbia..
 
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normanbeats

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To the person who mention the river being abloe to be seen from space... One of the things we used to do when scuba diving was to go collect stuff off of the bottom, you find all kinds of great stuff. as to not getting snagged, once you know how to feel where your lure is in the water, know what kind of structures are there, and how to avoid them you tend to snag less. When I first started last spring I spent more time messing with snags and tangled lines than salmon fishing. Now I know when I hit a snag and know to eas off and not set the hook into the snag, then walk around or boat around to the oposite side of the structure and pull it free. One good thing about getting into a lot of snags and line troubles arly on is you know how to deal with them later.
 
L

largofishingnut

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You've got to know the bottom that you're fishing over. Sometimes getting stuck on the bottom is just part of fishing. treble hooks often are less likely to get stuck on the bottom though. try those out!
 
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RunWithSasquatch

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Well you could put a Puff Ball on all three hooks... then it'd float real nice.
 
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JeannaJigs

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Well you could put a Puff Ball on all three hooks... then it'd float real nice.

I've seen a guy do this at Odell lol. I thought he was tipping his hooks with corn but upon closer inspection, I discovered puff balls. Didn't even know what to think when my dad was all "hey that's a good idea"...
 
A

alm21

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Happy Valley, Oregon
Snags are my way of helping stimulate the economy. I don't want to count the dollars I've spent on replacing spinners that I couldn't get loose. Along those lines, accept that you will lose gear and master the "un-snagging" techniques. First, if you feel snagged, don't pull back on it right away as that can really get you stuck. Still water can be tricky from a bank but if you are on a stream, open your bail, let some line float downstream, walk downstream and then close your bail and gently reel in the slack and give it a couple tugs. Repeat as necessary and go upstream if downstream doesn't work. If you have to break off, tighten down your drag and drop your pole so parallel with the line (no flex in the rod) and walk straight back until it breaks off. This will prevent your rod from going through unnecessary stress. Don't forgot to loosen your drag immediately otherwise you will may be very disappointed if you hook into a good sized fish and it breaks off because your drag is too tight.
 
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Drew9870

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Treble hooks less likely to get snagged? I want what your smokin!

Haha, no joke, I'll pay top dollar too!!!

Seems to me, on Earth, that a single point would slide over a limb or piece of debris without catching before a treble would.
 
A

alseaalumaweld

biggest mistake I see guys making is trying to driftfish using too much weight!! and wont liten up
 
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