How should I use my salmon eggs?

Fred
I got some eggs from this hen I caught near the end of this October. I cured them and then set them in the back of the fridge, but I never got around to using them. They still look good should I freeze them until I want to use them? Maybe put them in spawn sacs for steelhead?
 
jamisonace
Freeze them unless you're going to use them soon. i always freeze my eggs as soon as they are done curing. Once thawed, I don't freeze them again. I try to freeze them in quantities I expect to use in one day.
 
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Fred
jamisonace said:
Freeze them unless you're going to use them soon. i always freeze my eggs as soon as they are done curing. Once thawed, I don't freeze them again. I try to freeze them in quantities I expect to use in one day.
I’ll freeze them then thanks for your advice.
 
Grant22
I've had eggs leftover from fall Chinook season that I put in the back of my fridge and forgot about until Springer season (about 7 months). Didn't have any other ones so i used them and caught fish. They'll hold for a while. I keep mine in jars while storing.
 
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DOKF
My wife claims all salmon eggs to make ikura. Yumm!
 
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jamisonace
DOKF said:
My wife claims all salmon eggs to make ikura. Yumm!

That is a great use for them. Does she share her recipe?
 
DOKF
We could share, if you like ikura.
 
jamisonace
DOKF
My wife started from a standard Japanese recipe, and has modified it to our tastes.

But here is a good simple recipe in English:

https://norecipes.com/ikura-salmon-caviar/
The key is to start with fresh salmon roe, and to keep everything clean and cold.

Separating individual eggs from the skein is the hardest part. Some recipes call for manual separation, others quickly blanch the skein in hot water to remove the retaining membrane. My wife uses the hot water technique.

We also refrain from adding sugar, and use mirin instead of sake. The mirin has enough sweetness for our tastes. Also, choose a good quality Japanese soy sauce ("shoyu", we use Kikkoman or Yamasa). Chinese or Philipino soy sauce works well for Chinese or Philipino dishes, but not ikura.

The cured ikura will last a couple weeks in the fridge, depending on how salty you make the brine. You can also freeze it in small containers.

Careful not to mistake your cured bait for ikura!
 
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jamisonace
DOKF said:
My wife started from a standard Japanese recipe, and has modified it to our tastes.

But here is a good simple recipe in English:

https://norecipes.com/ikura-salmon-caviar/
The key is to start with fresh salmon roe, and to keep everything clean and cold.

Separating individual eggs from the skein is the hardest part. Some recipes call for manual separation, others quickly blanch the skein in hot water to remove the retaining membrane. My wife uses the hot water technique.

We also refrain from adding sugar, and use mirin instead of sake. The mirin has enough sweetness for our tastes. Also, choose a good quality Japanese soy sauce ("shoyu", we use Kikkoman or Yamasa). Chinese or Philipino soy sauce works well for Chinese or Philipino dishes, but not ikura.

The cured ikura will last a couple weeks in the fridge, depending on how salty you make the brine. You can also freeze it in small containers.

Careful not to mistake your cured bait for ikura!

Thanks for the recipe and the tips. I always eat a few eggs when I'm curing for bait but its so much better brined.
 
jamisonace
DOKF said:
My wife started from a standard Japanese recipe, and has modified it to our tastes.

But here is a good simple recipe in English:

https://norecipes.com/ikura-salmon-caviar/
The key is to start with fresh salmon roe, and to keep everything clean and cold.

Separating individual eggs from the skein is the hardest part. Some recipes call for manual separation, others quickly blanch the skein in hot water to remove the retaining membrane. My wife uses the hot water technique.

We also refrain from adding sugar, and use mirin instead of sake. The mirin has enough sweetness for our tastes. Also, choose a good quality Japanese soy sauce ("shoyu", we use Kikkoman or Yamasa). Chinese or Philipino soy sauce works well for Chinese or Philipino dishes, but not ikura.

The cured ikura will last a couple weeks in the fridge, depending on how salty you make the brine. You can also freeze it in small containers.

Careful not to mistake your cured bait for ikura!
I did this with steelhead roe this weekend. For the brine I made fresh dashi and added soy sauce, mirin and salt and brined 24 hours. The ikura turned out really good. I put it over sushi rice covered in furikake and garnished with green onion.
 
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