Float fishing with baitcaster

Steelheadreams

New member
I promise this is not a dig on any of the retail stores out there. When it comes to the more expensive / better quality rods I would actually just order from the actual manufacturer. I had a particular experience ( I wont be mentioning the store and it wasn't really their fault) when I bought my St. Croix rod. The first trip out the tip exploded when I had warranty work done on it I found out the rod was over a year old.

Where I am going with this , I think some of the more expensive rods sell a bit slower so could be on the shelves for much longer. With lots of people handling them , how many times have you witnessed someone or accidentally yourself banged the rod into the other rods sitting right next to it on the shelf. or watched someone when shaking the rod hit the ground etc.. Again this is no dig on any of the retailers.

Just my 2 Cents
Jer
How do you like the St Croix? What kind of rod is it?
 

ChezJfrey

Well-known member
I keep the bail open to my right (left hand retrieve), and keep my pinky on the bail to snap it shut, and let out line between my thumb and forefinger for control. Not a perfect system, and there is a slight delay, but it can extend a drift into water you can't reach otherwise.

And for float rods, the longer, the better, assuming it's not in tight quarters on the bank (and sometimes hiking in with a long rod can suck). But anything over 8' usually does the trick. I've bobber fished with a 7 footer, but the arm gets tired from holding the rod so high for too long.

You want to hear real wackiness? I let the line slip through my looped forefinger/thumb, then to set the hook, I grab the line and lift the rod a la fly fishing style. When you feel a fish, quickly check to make sure no line is looped around a handle or knob, then slowly allow the fish some line and move hand toward the bail while still holding it, then flip bail closed. You need a little feel for what the fish is doing and how much tension and give to allow, but it works for me.
 

Steelheadreams

New member
You want to hear real wackiness? I let the line slip through my looped forefinger/thumb, then to set the hook, I grab the line and lift the rod a la fly fishing style. When you feel a fish, quickly check to make sure no line is looped around a handle or knob, then slowly allow the fish some line and move hand toward the bail while still holding it, then flip bail closed. You need a little feel for what the fish is doing and how much tension and give to allow, but it works for me.
nice. thanks
 
I find that the delay caused by setting the hook with an open bail on a spinning setup (float fishing) causes me to miss some strikes.

I keep the bail open to my right (left hand retrieve), and keep my pinky on the bail to snap it shut, and let out line between my thumb and forefinger for control. Not a perfect system, and there is a slight delay, but it can extend a drift into water you can't reach otherwise.

And for float rods, the longer, the better, assuming it's not in tight quarters on the bank (and sometimes hiking in with a long rod can suck). But anything over 8' usually does the trick. I've bobber fished with a 7 footer, but the arm gets tired from holding the rod so high for too long.

Very similar to the DrT. I also reel with my left hand. But I hold my bail in my left hand with my arms fully extended pointing my tip at my bobber. I constantly keep up the slack by mending the line upstream by lifting the line to the bobber and setting it down then repointing my tip at the bobber, and when I get a takedown, my hand is on the bail, so I can flip the bail with my hand already on the crank. Any slack I can take up by bending my arms and bringing the reel close to my chest as I set the hook. I don't miss many clean takedowns as I am watching my bobber at all times. The longer rod helps in not having to raise your hands way over your head to get a set, as well as ease in mending. I do keep a shorter 7 footer ready for casting hardware.
 

Hooked Up

Active member
I use a 10'6" baitcaster. My reel has centrifugal braking so letting out line doesn't seem to be a problem. I like the option of being able to thumb the spool to get the float right where I want it.
 
How do you like the St Croix? What kind of rod is it?

I love my Rod , its relatively short for a true floating setup. I have a Wild River 8'6. I am fairly new to float fishing but I bought myself a vise started tying up my own jigs for the first time and started floating my Jigs. I enjoy learning new tactics then applying them.
 

Gtxjones

New member
I've been into Centerpining now for a few years and I am transitioning into using a baitcaster west coast style (I'm from the Great Lakes). We use the long 13+ ft rods here. Wondering the rods and length used mostly in the west coast for float fishing with baitcasting setup. I was told you guys prefer the shorter 8' rods? Thanks for the advice.
I have recently tried my curado baitcaster on a 13 ft rod ,w/;a bass assassin rigged TX weedless .
There is a a whole new world of jigging features and something is getting on the hook.
Thanks I will be using this setup for awhile.
 
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